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Higher math


Allen
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1 minute ago, Allen said:

Does anyone here have the mental capacity to wrap their head around higher math?

I’m trying to wrap my head around Maxwell’s equations and holy crap it’s hard. 

I got a degree in math/computer science.  I forget Maxwell's equations but could (hopefully) figure it out.  ;)

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Maxwell's equations are a set of coupled partial differential equations that, together with the Lorentz force law, form the foundation of classical electromagnetism, classical optics, and electric circuits. ... Maxwell first used the equations to propose that light is an electromagnetic phenomenon.

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3 minutes ago, Allen said:

Does anyone here have the mental capacity to wrap their head around higher math?

I’m trying to wrap my head around Maxwell’s equations and holy crap it’s hard. 

No.  Mathing eludes me once you get past geometry.  Basic math I can do in my head. 

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Remember math is just symbols (variables) that represent something measurable.  As daunting as they look, most algebra can be solved following the order of operands.  The calculus portions are really just the summations of measurements over time (usually).

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5 minutes ago, Dottles said:

Maxwell's equations - Stock Image - C020/0636 - Science Photo Library

It looks to me the only calculus portions are the bottom two equations.  And they both measure the change of something over time.

Actually I take this back.  They are all calculus equations. In fact they are all differential equations.

-1: Maxwell's equations in time domain

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This is helpful to understand what these differential equations are.

In mathematics, a differential equation is an equation that relates one or more functions and their derivatives. In applications, the functions generally represent physical quantities, the derivatives represent their rates of change, and the differential equation defines a relationship between the two.

 

So in short, a differential equation is the relationship of the rate of change (usually with respect to time) between two or more entities. In other words, how does the rate of change in something effect the rate of change in something else?  For example, I get an erection at an increased rate when my wife is naked in the tub based on a few conditions.  How does that rate effect the rate of desire in my wife?  Is this relationship directly proportional (I wish) to her interests or indirectly proportional (typical -- run for the exits)?

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My daughter has a masters in theoretical math.  My son is a computer/electrical engineer who innately understands math better than his sister.  His wife has a PhD in physical Chemistry.  The 3 of them occasionally will go off on a little discussion about math stuff, and they could be speaking Remulak for all any of the rest of us know.  They get all excited, talk about math books they're reading for fun.

weird kids.

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1 hour ago, Allen said:

Does anyone here have the mental capacity to wrap their head around higher math?

I’m trying to wrap my head around Maxwell’s equations and holy crap it’s hard. 

I had to use them a lot when I was taking 200 & 300 level college calculus-based Physics classes and some in upper level (300-600) chemistry classes.

I remember that in some instances, you can get away with converting the partial derivatives in the equations into ordinary deltas (changes in), but its been a long time since I had to do anything more complicated with electromagnetism than the right hand solenoid rule to determine which end of the bar is magnetic North.

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1 minute ago, Bikeguy said:

How about letting someone else explain this.    I gave up on high level math after they handed me my diploma.  

Maxwell's Equations of Electrodynamics: An Explanation

cover

So now, this is going from a paying gig (but not much, apparently) into a gig that he's gotta pay to play????

Damn, higher math is rough!

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