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Peace Arch Park- Canada-U.S. border


shootingstar
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https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/ranger-rickey-rick-blank-peace-arch-parks-steward-canada-us-blaine-washington-park-1.5677625

Do Americans feel any psychological difference crossing into CAnada?  I just feel it for a split second....from the health care perspective (I don't want an accident to happen to me), and sometimes I can hear slight changes in people's accents. Depending on the state, some states, feel more closer to Canada in terms of their speech, familiarity just dealing with CAnadian tourists.  For instance, in Vermont we felt "closer" to the state as Canadians from Ontario.

Personally when in Seattle, I don't feel super difference...except for some huge food portions in some restaurants especially in some 'burbs that amazed us.  Vancouver and Seattle in terms of urban issues, there's a shared Cascadia mentality of common issues, etc. re transportation, environmental matters, etc.

Where Americans and Canadians can meet during this covid time -- Blaine, WA and White Rock, BC.  I've seen the park from afar, but have never stopped there personally.  I have cycled across the international border at this point on 2 different bike trips.  Below, I have just crossed back into Canada.

Returning to Canada from Blaine, Washington. At international border crossing in bike lane. Ahead white arches and flags for Canada and U.S. mark the border. 2010

Below a 2nd international border crossing  ...between Waterton National Park in Canada and Glacier National Park in Montana. Below was a trip via car. Dearie has crossed it by bike in a trans-continental solo bike trip.

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park at Chief Mountain Road border crossing checkpoint. On the Alberta side.

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I was just up at the border last weekend or the weekend before house viewing. I like it there. It's a quaint little place and beautiful. I can tell you if I move into Whatcom County, your Chinatown will be visited just to eat. Maybe Richland. 

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1 hour ago, sheep_herder said:

I cycled across with a group to the International Peace Gardens several years ago when cycling the CANDISC in North Dakota. I think we also cycled just across the border north of Glacier Park, before starting the Park-2-Park in 2004.

I've been to the Peace Gardens too, but I didn't cross the border (but I waved :nodhead: )

I remember being at a skating  event in Detroit and I ran into a number of Japanese fans who seemed  a bit lost.  My friend and I walked with them to the old arena, and they all were very excited when we pointed out that it was Canada across the river. They seemed to think they got a bonus by seeing an extra country on their trip.

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1 hour ago, Kirby said:

I've been to the Peace Gardens too, but I didn't cross the border (but I waved :nodhead: )

I remember being at a skating  event in Detroit and I ran into a number of Japanese fans who seemed  a bit lost.  My friend and I walked with them to the old arena, and they all were very excited when we pointed out that it was Canada across the river. They seemed to think they got a bonus by seeing an extra country on their trip.

When we were cycling from southern Germany to Switzerland (90 km.1 way trip where we took the train back same day), we came to a junction where in different directions while in Germany, we could see Switzerland and France.  (We were in France a few days before).  It felt like a bonus too, to see another country without needing to cross border at that time, actually just across a canal..into France.

2 hours ago, Mr. Grumpy said:

Canada feels different.  It seems more relaxed

Except for my father who never stepped in the U.S. during his lifetime, everyone, I mean every Canadian who I  know personally face to face, has visited the U.S. Of course, it depends how close one lives near the border, circumstances in life to travel (method of transportation, cost and time, etc.) and reasons for visiting U.S. will affect frequency and length of time.  Of oourse, I've known various CAnadians who lived and worked in the U.S. for a few yrs. and returned back home.

Those I know, it's been a blend of vacation, shopping (some deals) and more rarely, seeing family.

For most who have vacationed in the U.S., sometimes it's driving into there, flying or on rare occasion taking a boat.  I forgot, I've known a few personally who cycle into the U.S.  I've travelled between Canada and U.S. via these methods:  (Amtrak) train, air, bike, walk (hiking from waterton national park into glacier national park), bus, car and ferry boat (Washington State ferry from Sidney, British Columbia). 

I've been in the U.S. probably over 30+ times in my lifetime so far.

However, one wonders if many Americans living within 50-300 miles from the international border, have visited CAnada. Maybe the cost of passport these past few yrs., might be an additional deterrent.

 

 

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14 hours ago, shootingstar said:

However, one wonders if many Americans living within 50-300 miles from the international border, have visited CAnada. Maybe the cost of passport these past few yrs., might be an additional deterrent.

It was pretty common for us to go to Canada when I was in my late teens and early 20's because the drinking age in Canada is 19.  That was before you needed a passport and the wait at customs was only about 10 minutes.  Now you need a passport and it can easily take over an hour to get through customs.  I don't know if that deters kids these days from going to Canada just to drink. 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Grumpy said:

 Now you need a passport and it can easily take over an hour to get through customs.  I don't know if that deters kids these days from going to Canada just to drink. 

Probably is the deterrent for just drinking purposes.  Nowadays with online shopping, there's less of a need to drive over. What might not be the same, especially for the smaller border US towns, is the wider range of restaurant /food cuisine choices in Vancouver or Toronto.  Calgary is abit further away from the border with choices a little more limited (and even more expensive than Vancouver or Toronto) and to me, the quality is not the same as other 2 cities.   

For instance in Toronto there is for sure, waaaay more choice in Carribbean cuisine and also the different East and South Asian restaurants. Vancouver is same, excluding the Carribbean choices. I'm choosing restaurant food, because you need to visit the city or ...have long-distance takeout?? :lol:

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We’ve traveled to BC, Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec. The cities feel more European than cities in the US, especially the ones in Quebec where people speak French. Even the small towns along the northern shore of Lake Superior had a Scandinavian simplicity. We regret not stopping at a fry stand along the highway. 

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15 hours ago, shootingstar said:

However, one wonders if many Americans living within 50-300 miles from the international border, have visited CAnada. Maybe the cost of passport these past few yrs., might be an additional deterrent.

Most of the "real ID" deadlines have been put on hold due to the pandemic and the fact a lot of DMV offices were closed, but there is a push in the  US to have drivers licenses with enhanced background information.  Eventually you'll need a real ID drivers license to use your drivers license as identification for flying within the US, so if you fly at all, the real ID is worth it.  For a small extra fee (less than a passport and less hassle), you can get an enhanced real ID license that will work at land crossings into Canada (when the border is open). The people I know who live near the border definitely recommended the enhanced ID for convenience.

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