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Fridge is broken.


MoseySusan
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Just now, roadsue said:

As part of our remodel, the contractor has to move two walls to make it fit. 

Ok....you were scaring me. Our fridge has been making noises and we’ve been kicking around getting another one.

I knew there was a slight wait, but you had me thinking people were hoarding fridges now, too.

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Just now, F_in Ray Of Sunshine said:

Ok....you were scaring me. Our fridge has been making noises and we’ve been kicking around getting another one.

I knew there was a slight wait, but you had me thinking people were hoarding fridges now, too.

Minimum advance on our appliance purchase was eight weeks, though. We purchased from a builders supply. Might want to look into it. We 

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53 minutes ago, roadsue said:

As part of our remodel, the contractor has to move two walls to make it fit. 

When we built our home, we contractor made it so the refrigerator would recess into the rear wall.  The front of the refrigerator just extends enough past the counter tops enough so the doors open OK.  

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I fear my refrigerator may be on the blink as well.  It seems to have bursts of extreme cold which is usually a bad sign that it is dying.  I'd prefer to wait a little longer before having to replace it so we'll see how it goes.

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31 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Good luck.  

Two ideas here sound good.  Get you new one and put it somewhere or get a used one.

You beat me to it - my thoughts exactly.

Did you ever notice on the BBC comedies and dramas they show on PBS that the refrigerators in British houses are usually the size of hotel room fridges?

They must do frequent food shopping and use a lot of canned or otherwise preserved stuff.

So a small, used one might work.  I'm thinking of the milk, meat, fruit, cheese, cold drinks, butter, lettuce, onions, tomatoes, pickles, partly used jars of mustard, ketchup, A1-Sauce, salsa, etc. that make my life more enjoyable having on hand and which would be a great pain to go without until November.  I hope there's a place you can put the new fridge until renovations are made.

The trouble finding those things in March when I moved into the apartment was enough to cause high anxiety!

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4 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

You beat me to it - my thoughts exactly.

Did you ever notice on the BBC comedies and dramas they show on PBS that the refrigerators in British houses are usually the size of hotel room fridges?

They must do frequent food shopping and use a lot of canned or otherwise preserved stuff.

So a small, used one might work.  I'm thinking of the milk, meat, fruit, cheese, cold drinks, butter, lettuce, onions, tomatoes, pickles, partly used jars of mustard, ketchup, A1-Sauce, salsa, etc. that make my life more enjoyable having on hand and which would be a great pain to go without until November.  I hope there's a place you can put the new fridge until renovations are made.

The trouble finding those things in March when I moved into the apartment was enough to cause high anxiety!

One reason that the Brits drink warm beer. Back when we lived there around 1990, it was common to buy food daily or every second day.

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We will find out tomorrow whether it can be repaired. Meanwhile we’re using our cooler and ice for keeping essentials cold. 
Plan b if this one cannot be repaired is to buy a mini fridge, just enough space for essentials. I’ll move it to my classroom for the remainder of the school year, then we will sell it. 
The bright side is I can finally let go of all those partially eaten leftovers and nearly empty jars of different salsas and pickled things. I opened an old jar of olives stuffed with garlic last week, and there was a half-inch thick layer of...I just don’t know what kind of fungus grows on olive juice. I think a lot of these jars are past their usefulness.

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1 hour ago, Kirby said:

I fear my refrigerator may be on the blink as well.  It seems to have bursts of extreme cold which is usually a bad sign that it is dying.  I'd prefer to wait a little longer before having to replace it so we'll see how it goes.

I recommend vacuuming the dust off the coils. Even if it’s not the source of the problem, the repair person will see you as tidy. 

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20 minutes ago, roadsue said:

We will find out tomorrow whether it can be repaired. Meanwhile we’re using our cooler and ice for keeping essentials cold. 
Plan b if this one cannot be repaired is to buy a mini fridge, just enough space for essentials. I’ll move it to my classroom for the remainder of the school year, then we will sell it. 
The bright side is I can finally let go of all those partially eaten leftovers and nearly empty jars of different salsas and pickled things. I opened an old jar of olives stuffed with garlic last week, and there was a half-inch thick layer of...I just don’t know what kind of fungus grows on olive juice. I think a lot of these jars are past their usefulness.

This was the one advantage of loosing our power.  The fridge is now a candidate for Better Homes and Kitchens.

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