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Where should I put the cookies?


smudge
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The back side of my shed keeps drooping. I walk in the front door, and I can feel the floor tilting back. I put the level on it, and sure enough. Not sure, but maybe the squirrels have something to do with it with their digging... or the fact that the back is where the spare lumber, chipboard, and shelves are stored.  When I was preparing the "foundation," I dug a shovel's depth down all around and filled it with gravel... kinda like footings.  I've dug down at the back corners once last summer, jacked it up with a bottle jack, filled in more gravel (6AA), and it was good. But now it's down again. 

I have "cookies" under the burl posts, and they are working great for supporting the porch roof and the occasional bear. (ooh! I didn't show you that one, did I?!)  So I went back to the gravel and concrete place I worked at years ago and got two more cookies for the back; 12 x 6" rounds.  I also got a couple five gallon buckets of 6AA.  

What do you think: Should I shoot more for the corners for the supporting cookies or place them in a foot or so? Probably overthinking since it's only a 10x10' shed, but I figured I'd throw this out there for y'all to hash out. Lemme know what you think. It's this weekend's project.

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@Dottles has a guy that is great with footings for shed platforms.

I think you need to move the shed, dig down anywhere from 3 to 17 feet and fill that with concrete and rebar and a mix of crushed limestone and dreams.

Let the piers cure for three weeks then get a laser and shoot a line to mark level for the shed, subtract the thickness of the cookies and then grind the piers down to height, set the cookies on the piers then reset the shed.

Easy Peasy.

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9 minutes ago, Scrapr said:

 

*ask @2Far he has some construction experience & may be out of work soon

Sound like your posts are kinda  "point loading" the gravel. & either pushing it in to the substrate or pushing it up & out. I'd try putting a coupla 12" square pieces of marine plywood (or 12" long pieces of 2"x 12") under each post to distribute the load over a bigger area.

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2 minutes ago, 2Far said:

Sound like your posts are kinda  "point loading" the gravel. & either pushing it in to the substrate or pushing it up & out. I'd try putting a coupla 12" square pieces of marine plywood (or 12" long pieces of 2"x 12") under each post to distribute the load over a bigger area.

Hmmmm, I do have some left over pressure treated stuff......... I was thinking about the "point loading" (though not in the exact terminology) too.  Ya, I like that.

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11 minutes ago, jsharr said:

@Dottles has a guy that is great with footings for shed platforms.

I think you need to move the shed, dig down anywhere from 3 to 17 feet and fill that with concrete and rebar and a mix of crushed limestone and dreams.

Let the piers cure for three weeks then get a laser and shoot a line to mark level for the shed, subtract the thickness of the cookies and then grind the piers down to height, set the cookies on the piers then reset the shed.

Easy Peasy.

Psht!! Easy Peasy fer shure!!!  Thanks!

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Just now, smudge said:

Hmmmm, I do have some left over pressure treated stuff......... I was thinking about the "point loading" (though not in the exact terminology) too.  Ya, I like that.

Depending what size PT you have left over, you can cut 12" pieces, put two side-by-side over two others at a 90o angle & screw them together.

 

 

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