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Definitions of lovely fish dish - a tad more naked


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Anyway, a wk. ago, had this lovely fish dinner at a sparsely occupied restaurant.

I think the fish was roasted..just from the texture of skin.  It was properly executed fish dish....  lightly cooked and not covered up with a ton of sauce nor a thick layer of deep fried batter. I like my fish dishes a little more naked...to taste the delicate texture of fish itself.

And yes, I like proper sashimi as well as sushi.

seabreamroasted fish2.JPG

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  • shootingstar changed the title to Definitions of lovely fish dish - a tad more naked


It looks lovely.  I want someone else to remove the head.  glad you had an enjoyable dinner

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13 minutes ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

I had Hog Fish, blackened last night. A nice fish, sweeter than grouper.

Above fish is sea bream ...a type of fish I normally don't prepare at home.  I have steamed a whole (already cleaned) small trout for dinner at various times.  I'm not totally comfortable to buy sea bream for home.  

Hog fish must be a colloquial term under another real fish name.

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34 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

I like my fish dishes a little more naked...to taste the delicate texture of fish itself.

Everything tastes better naked. :party:

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11 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

Hog fish must be a colloquial term under another real fish name.

Quote

The hogfish (Lachnolaimus maximus) (known as boquinete, doncella de pluma or pez perro in Mexico[3]) is a species of wrasse native to the Western Atlantic Ocean, living in a range from Nova Scotia, Canada, to northern South America, including the Gulf of Mexico. This species occurs around reefs, especially preferring areas with plentiful gorgonians. This species is currently the only known member of its genus.[2]

 

 

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47 minutes ago, Airehead said:

It looks lovely.  I want someone else to remove the head.  glad you had an enjoyable dinner

When I visited Hong Kong (still part of Britain) My sister recommended that I try pigeon as a meal. It was excellent but I didn’t request the head on the side. I used a spare teacup to avert its eyes as I ate its flesh. Chinese cooking demands fresh ingredients and that means live chicken and seafood when you buy it. 

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22 minutes ago, Old No. 7 said:

When I visited Hong Kong (still part of Britain) My sister recommended that I try pigeon as a meal. It was excellent but I didn’t request the head on the side. I used a spare teacup to avert its eyes as I ate its flesh. Chinese cooking demands fresh ingredients and that means live chicken and seafood when you buy it. 

When I lived in Toronto, at a French restaurant (you know their gentile haute cuisine can be just as "barbaric" as the Chinese, because some eat horsemeat, fois gras), I had pigeon. Just the meat. I found it a bit too gamey /rich. (And I'm a person who likes duck breast, etc.)

I have never seen pigeon on any Chinese restaurant menu in the big Canadian cities where I've lived. If it exists, it's very rare.

True, I only keep fresh seafood in fridge before prep. max. 2 days.  Steaming fish fillet or whole fish in a flat dish demands quality fresh fish.  Most times, I cook it same day when bought.  Of course, that doesn't mean much, when it might have been pre-frozen when shipped to store.

As a child in Ontario, I loved steamed pickerel, whitefish...with ginger root, onion, oil and abit of soy sauce. You find this dish as part of a multi-course banquet meal at a wedding, anniversary, Chinese New Year's, etc. It is considered fine dining both at home and in any Chinese restaurant.  For instance, I don't think this style of fish prep. is on a Japanese restaurant meal which I find interesting. 

Nowadays for me, it's steamed sockeyeor pink salmon, trout or Arctic char at home.

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On a large fish the cheeks are considered a delicacy, they may be on a small fish also, but are too small to bother with

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2 minutes ago, Further said:

On a large fish the cheeks are considered a delicacy, they may be on a small fish also, but are too small to bother with

Yeah they are yummy, taste like scallops.

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I grew up eating fresh caught fish cooked simply with the head on.  It’s really the best way to eat fish but fish & chips is damn good too! 

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17 minutes ago, Further said:

On a large fish the cheeks are considered a delicacy, they may be on a small fish also, but are too small to bother with

I have eaten the cheeks...without thinking about it. I think I was a kid.  You see, food hang-ups don't occur if you don't mention it to kid what they are eating under parental supervision. I'm beginning to wonder if Western culture over explains about food to children...especially if it's healthy food. 

Actually doubt, mother even paid attention..more concerned about baby siblings and fish bones.

I do not want to see a pig's head at my food table. Nor chicken/duck head either. 

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13 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

I grew up eating fresh caught fish cooked simply with the head on.  It’s really the best way to eat fish but fish & chips is damn good too! 

I only like fish and chips, if there is a thin deeply fried batter over fish and lots of fish inside. With malt vinegar.  Most fish and chips I've had, have way too thick deep fried batter casings.  The dish should showcase fresh fish, not bury it in greasiness.

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Head on!  That's rare!

After my tour group left Capernaum on a boat ride on the Sea of Galilee, we disembarked at Bethsaida, hometown of Apostles Peter, Andrew, and Phillip, where we went to a restaurant for a dinner including fish from the Sea of Galilee. It looked like this from a Google search.  This is "St. Peter's Fish," actually a variety of Tilapia (Tilapia Galilea):

Fish of the Sea of Galilee | Ferrell's Travel Blog

They were served with the head-on and some of our group, mostly Americans, couldn't eat it that way and were bothered by the rest of us having the heads sitting on our plate.  So we all had to send the plates back to have the heads removed!

It wasn't gourmet, but it was a Sea of Galilee fish, famous for being multiplied at the nearby Sermon on the Mount, etc., so we enjoyed it.

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16 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

Head on!  That's rare!

After my tour group left Capernaum on a boat ride on the Sea of Galilee, we disembarked at Bethsaida, hometown of Apostles Peter, Andrew, and Phillip, where we went to a restaurant for a dinner including fish from the Sea of Galilee.

They were served with the head-on and some of our group, mostly Americans, couldn't eat it that way and were bothered by the rest of us having the heads sitting on our plate.  So we all had to send the plates back to have the heads removed!

It wasn't gourmet, but it was some kind of Sea of Galilee fish, famous for being multiplied at the nearby Sermon on the Mount, etc., so we enjoyed it.

Until, now I didn't realize the head-on fish was rare for ..Anglo-continental European North Americans???  I am willing to bet alot of Asian descent North Americans aren't as bothered by head on cooked fish at table, especially lst to 2nd generations.

By the way, my above photo last week..we ate at a French cuisine restaurant. Looking out of restaurant, you can see the marina a few feet away. It's lovely.

***But whatever, head on or off, fish can be healthy for you.

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I'm having a haddock fillet with the last of my leftover mac, cauliflower & cheese.

I like the taste and texture of haddock and it's very forgiving if it's a little overcooked or overnuked.

I also don't load it down with lots of seasoning or sauces, though I do like to have it with something else that has some sauce like mac & cheese, Main St. Scalloped Potatoes, spaghetti, etc.

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7 hours ago, shootingstar said:

Until, now I didn't realize the head-on fish was rare for ..Anglo-continental European North Americans???  I am willing to bet alot of Asian descent North Americans aren't as bothered by head on cooked fish at table, especially lst to 2nd generations.

By the way, my above photo last week..we ate at a French cuisine restaurant. Looking out of restaurant, you can see the marina a few feet away. It's lovely.

***But whatever, head on or off, fish can be healthy for you.

Oh it freaked out my wife & Sister in Law when my mom cooked fish with the head on.  Neither were ever exposed to it.

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