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Chicken and waffles


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What is this strange dish like?  Please explain it to someone that has never tried it.

What do you use for sauce?

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Never tried it.  Doesn’t  sound appetizing.

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7 minutes ago, Kzoo said:

Never tried it.  Doesn’t  sound appetizing.

I am curious.  I might taste it someday.

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I have had it and it’s good.  You often get biscuits with fried chicken so it’s not that far of a stretch.  

The place I went to had different ways of serving the chicken & waffles.  You could get regular fried chicken or fried chicken & a gravy with waffles & syrup.  I get the regular and do try to keep the syrup off the chicken but some people put syrup on the chicken or gravy on the waffles.

  

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4 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

I am curious.  I might taste it someday.

I’m not a fan of waffles.  I’ll take chicken and waffles please - hold the waffles.

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Very popular down South. My son has ordered it a few times when we went out to eat but I never tried it. 

1...I don't do well with deep fried foods. 

2...waffles are way to high in carbohydrates.

It looked good 

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My family goes nuts over this stuff.  I find it disgusting.

Photo Of Bacon Waffle At Hash House A Go Go At Rio Las Vegas

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The sweetness of syrup is really good with the saltiness of the chickens.  I like a little kick with the chicken like a Nashville "hot" chicken.  You should try it.  Surprisingly good.

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1 hour ago, Parr8hed said:

The sweetness of syrup is really good with the saltiness of the chickens.  I like a little kick with the chicken like a Nashville "hot" chicken.  You should try it.  Surprisingly good.

So like a waffle sandwich with syrup as a condiment.  

Thank you for the description.  I am a fan of tasting many kinds of foods.  I rarely eat fried foods, so this would be a rare experience. 

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1 hour ago, bikeman564™ said:

:dontknow: I've had chicken, and waffles. but never chicken and waffles

Try the Hash House a Go Go.  We have one in the Casino near here.  It's one of their specialties. 

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1 hour ago, Dirtyhip said:

I rarely eat fried foods, so this would be a rare experience. 

Yeah, I don't eat fried chicken.  It would have to be broiled.

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22 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Try the Hash House a Go Go.  We have one in the Casino near here.  It's one of their specialties. 

never heard of it, but I'll keep it in mind

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3 hours ago, Parr8hed said:

I like a little kick with the chicken like a Nashville "hot" chicken

This is how you eat it. Nashville hot chicken, mapley syrupy sweet waffles. Eat a bite of each together. Heavenly

Quote

Try the Hash House a Go Go.  We have one in the Casino near here.  It's one of their specialties. 

They jam. I have several of their mugs and like eating there. There's one in Orlando so we sometimes eat there when we visit the mouse house.

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I've tried a number of dishes that were transformed from savory to sweet in various ways and always preferred the savory version.

But I've enjoyed syrupy waffles with sausage or ham, so I think chicken should work ok.

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5 hours ago, Dirtyhip said:

So like a waffle sandwich with syrup as a condiment.  

If you're going to try it, I would suggest making it a syrup sandwich with waffles as a condiment.  :nodhead:

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It's a big thing in Amish country.  So I had to try it once.

It was just - wrong.

Though for lunch today I did make a Scrapple sandwich.

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When my dad is in town, I make this.  Einstein doesn't eat it.  I use boneless chicken breasts because I never buy thighs.  This is spicy and hot.  Kind of like what @Parr8hed descibed.

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Vegetable Oil, for deep frying

BUTTERMILK BRINE

  • 2 cups (480 mL) buttermilk OR soured whole milk* (see notes)
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • ½ tbsp garlic powder
  • ½ tbsp onion powder
  • 1 tbsp hot sauce or chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika

SEASONED FLOUR CRUST

  • 3 cups (384 g) all-purpose flour
  • ⅓ cup (43 g) cornstarch
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tsp onion powder
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tsp freshly cracked black pepper

SPICY HONEY BUTTER SAUCE

  • ¼ cup (85 g) honey (you can sub maple syrup)
  • ½ tsp chili powder (or more if you like a lot of spice)
  • 4 tbsp (57 g) unsalted butter
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • Some hot sauce-- as you like.  Now I will use the Old Bay hot sauce that the Sunshine Committee sent me as a gift. 

Then make your best buttermilk waffles.

INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Whisk the buttermilk or soured milk, kosher salt, garlic powder, onion powder, hot sauce, and smoked paprika together in a large mixing bowl.
    2. Add the boneless, skinless chicken thigh to the bowl, making sure every thigh is covered in the brine. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the chicken marinate in the buttermilk brine from 1 hour to overnight in the fridge. 
    3. In a dutch oven pot, heat up about half the pot's worth of vegetable oil. Allow the oil to reach 350 degrees F (180 degrees C/ 160 degrees C if using a fan-forced oven).
    4. While the oil is heating up, in a mixing bowl whisk together flour, cornstarch, baking powder, and seasonings. Take each chicken thigh from the brine and dredge into the seasoned flour. Thoroughly coat the chicken all over, then let rest on a plate for five minutes before frying.
    5. Fry the chicken in the hot oil (no more than about 4 thighs per batch) until golden brown, crispy, and cooked through completely, about 8-9 minutes.
    6. Carefully take the chicken out of the oil and place them on a baking sheet fitted with a wire rack and let cool slightly before serving. Repeat until all the chicken thighs are fried.
    7. Make the waffles and serve the chicken on top of the waffles, then drizzle generously with spicy honey butter sauce.

SPICY HONEY BUTTER SAUCE

 

    1. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat with honey, chili powder, and kosher salt, some hot sauce. Whisk well until the mixture is incorporated and homogenized.
    2. Lower the temperature to 'warm/low' heat and keep for serving.

     

BUTTERMILK SUBSTITUTE


Whenever I can't find or don't have buttermilk, souring the milk I have with lemon juice (about ½ a lemon per cup of milk) and letting it sit for 3-5 minutes always does the trick.

 

 
 
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4 hours ago, 12string said:

Though for lunch today I did make a Scrapple sandwich.

I do not know what this is.

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1 minute ago, Square Wheels said:

Don't investigate.  Even the most hardy meat eater would not eat this.

I have had boudin before.  Some southern guy gave me some.  His Mother made it and I thought it was quite tasty.   I think it is also something made from scraps. 

I googled scrapple.  It looks like spam.  I ate spam in HI.  It was served by a local, as their contribution to family dinner in my camp site (spam fried rice).  HAHA, Our campsite was the party spot and I met so many locals and native HI folks.  They were very welcoming to us.  We shared food, beer and stories.  I didn't understand the negative stories that some people received.  One local brought us a fish on a spear.  I need to go back there.  It was magical.

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5 hours ago, 12string said:

It's a big thing in Amish country.  So I had to try it once.

It was just - wrong.

Though for lunch today I did make a Scrapple sandwich.

Scrapple with sliced apples sautéed.  This is a guilty pleasure for me as someone living near the apple-scapple festival.  This is and was the premier event in Bridgeville, Delaware long before pumpkin chunking became a thing. Now pumpkins are gone and apple scrapple still reigns. 

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24 minutes ago, Square Wheels said:

Don't investigate.  Even the most hardy meat eater would not eat this.

You are correct. I wouldn’t. 

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9 minutes ago, Parr8hed said:

You are correct. I wouldn’t. 

Well, you are not the brave man that I thought you were.  <kidding>

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18 hours ago, Dirtyhip said:

It looks like spam.

Oh, you've hurt true scrappleistas!

It's so many times better than Spam!

Did my Sandwich Maryland style, but will go Philly Style for breakfast tomorrow

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6 minutes ago, 12string said:

Oh, you've hurt true scrappleistas!

It's so many times better than Spam!

Did my Sandwich Maryland style, but will go Philly Style for breakfast tomorrow

My mom served us scrapple many many times as kids.  But she also gave us liver as well, so I question her decisions a bit.

I did and still do love Taylor pork roll.

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1 hour ago, 12string said:

Oh, you've hurt true scrappleistas!

It's so many times better than Spam!

Did my Sandwich Maryland style, but will go Philly Style for breakfast tomorrow

Agree--- it is not SPAM

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7 minutes ago, Airehead said:

Agree--- it is not SPAM

100% agree.  It is not SPAM.  SPAM is bad... scrapple is worse.

Ummmmmm.....

image.png.661a44e17e444e9c8ef2695481b5e486.png

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1 minute ago, Kzoo said:

100% agree.  It is not SPAM.  SPAM is bad... scrapple is worse.

Ummmmmm.....

 

I wonder where future Hawaiian @Prophet Zacharia falls on this discussion.  PA is definitely in the "scrapple" area of the US, but the US paradise not named California (Hawaii) LOVES Spam.

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1 hour ago, Razors Edge said:

Inside my belly? :dontknow:

Pork Roll or Taylor Ham.  Never both.  Already forgetting your East Coast roots?

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And as a Philly kid, I agree with the south Jersey and Philly folks!

The History of Pork Roll

Although several manufacturers make a generic product named “Pork Roll,” John Taylor’s Original Pork Roll is what most New Jerseyans ask for by name.  Made since 1856 it ia a main staple of diners, kitchens, Holiday tables, and boardwalks of the Garden State.

What is the difference between Taylor Ham and Taylor Pork Roll?  The proper name according to the manufacturer, Taylor Provisions of Trenton NJ, is John Taylor’s “Original Taylor Pork Roll.” It was originally called “Taylor Ham” and although the name was changed in 1906 many of us in North Jersey still call it simply, “Taylor Ham.”   Think of it as Kleenex is to tissues, Taylor Ham is to Pork Roll.

According to Eric of Taylor Provisions, people continue to use the two names interchangeably. We also asked him about Taystrips, or Tastystrios and he said they have not been manufactured for many years and have no plans at this time to do so in the future.

The name debate seems to be between North Jersey locals calling it Taylor Ham, and South Jersey and Philadelphians calling it “Pork Roll.”

Maybe Middletown, NJ is the dividing line? We hear from people all over the country telling us they never hear it called “pork roll” while just as many insist they’ve never heard of “Taylor Ham.”  I’d love to hear what others think. Enter your thoughts into the guestbook, or email kate@jerseyporkroll.com.

Shop around the internet for the lowest prices on Taylor Ham, pork roll AND shipping. Watch out for those sites that appear to charge less but make their profits on shipping. www.JerseyPorkRoll.com will charge you only what it costs to arrive at your door without adding handling charges.

“Jersey Pork Roll” is the registered, copyrighted name of this company, it is not the name of a particular brand of pork roll.  The  name was registered and copyrighted in 2004. NJPorkRoll is also a name registered to this company.  Neither were ever in use as generic names for pork roll prior to 2005.

From Wikipedia:

Taylor ham is the common name for pork roll, a food developed by John Taylor of Trenton, New Jersey, late in the 19th century.

Taylor is the brand name for pork roll made by Taylor Provisions, Inc., of Trenton. Taylor also manufactures pork roll under the Trenton brand. Trenton by Taylor has been an advertiser on the outfield wall at Mercer County Waterfront Park in Trenton since it opened in 1994. Other companies making pork roll include Case Pork Roll, Kohler Provisions and Loeffler Gourmet. (The Case Pork Roll manufacturing facility had a fire years ago but reopened quickly.)

Taylor kept the recipe for the product he created in 1856 secret. Taylor originally called his product “Taylor’s Prepared Ham”, but was forced to change the name after the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was passed, since the product did not meet the new legal definition of “ham”. The new name was “Pork Roll” and it was marketed as both “Taylor’s Pork Roll” and “Trenton Pork Roll”. Competitors marketed products with similar names like “Rolled Pork” and “Trenton style Pork Roll” and were sued by Taylor. A 1910 legal case ruled that the words “Pork Roll” could not be trademarked.

In 1910 it was described as “a food article made of pork, packed in a cylindrical cotton sack or bag in such form that it could be quickly prepared for cooking by slicing without removal from the bag.”

Pork roll is generally sold in 1, 1.5, and 3 lb. unsliced rolls packed in a cotton bag, as well as 6 oz. boxes containing 4, 6, or 8 slices. Larger rolls and packages are available for food service customers. It is also sold at delicatessens, diners, lunch stands and foodtrucks in the region.It has also been a staple in public school cafeterias in New Jersey.

The product is generally eaten sliced and grilled, like Canadian bacon. A slice fits neatly on a round roll, and it is frequently eaten as part of a breakfast sandwich, most often also including egg and cheese.

Pork roll generally comes in one-, three-, and six-pound sizes, as well as six-ounce boxes containing eight single-thickness slices or four double-thickness slices.

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2 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

I wonder where future Hawaiian @Prophet Zacharia falls on this discussion.  PA is definitely in the "scrapple" area of the US, but the US paradise not named California (Hawaii) LOVES Spam.

I’ve never had either. Fully aware of both, but have never been reduced to eating canned meats.

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Just now, Prophet Zacharia said:

I’ve never had either. Fully aware of both, but have never been reduced to eating canned meats.

Helicopter parents before there were helicopter parents?

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I eat none of these things.  When I feel like harming myself I have a bacon cheeseburger.

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40 minutes ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

I’ve never had either. Fully aware of both, but have never been reduced to eating canned meats.

Maybe try some musubi next time you are there.  If you have Hawaiian restaurants in your neck of the woods you can get it there too.

A slice of fried spam served on a square of sushi rice wrapped in nori.  Freaking tasty!

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54 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Helicopter parents before there were helicopter parents?

My dad ate scrapple. My mom wasn’t a fan and didn’t serve or encourage it.

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7 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

between North Jersey locals calling it Taylor Ham, and South Jersey and Philadelphians calling it “Pork Roll.”

We called it pork roll. It was a staple of our school lunches.

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18 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

I eat none of these things.  When I feel like harming myself I have a bacon cheeseburger.

Pork roll on a burger instead of bacon.  Just a suggestion.

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15 hours ago, Airehead said:

Serious yum but must be eaten rarely due to salt. 

Luckily, salt is not an issue for me.  But gone are the days where I (or my mom) would fry up a few slices of that for a lunch :(  SOOOO TASTY.

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People seem passionate about this subject.

I was just wanting to try a new food once to see what it was like.  This would not be something I would likely ever eat again.  The same with the spam.  A local HI guy brought it to the table, so I had to taste it.  I was not going to be rude. I will try a bit of most anything once.  

Rocky mountain oysters?  Sure.  I will try a bite.  

I also want to try fried crickets.  They seem popular on the other side of the world.  

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52 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

The same with the spam.  A local HI guy brought it to the table, so I had to taste it.  I was not going to be rude. I will try a bit of most anything once.  

But ChrisL's suggestion of sushified-Spam sounds great!  Give that a whirl. :)

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23 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

But ChrisL's suggestion of sushified-Spam sounds great!  Give that a whirl. :)

I have not eaten sushi in years.  

I will make a mental note. No promises.  

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