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When did you finally realize that you were not invincible?


Dirtyhip
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In my 20's and early 30's I thought I was unstoppable. My moment came in 2004, when the doc was going over my MRI results with me.  I was heavily into snowboarding at the time and I was really progressing at my sport.  I asked my neurologist about what these results meant to me.  I remember him saying "Most people with MS can still live normally with some slight modifications"  So, I asked him "Can I still boost big hospital sized airs?"  

 

He said "That would not be wise.  You already have a lot going on.  You should really avoid breaking yourself."

 

It was that moment that I realized that I wasn't Wonder Woman.  I still live every moment with gusto, but closed the chapter on the 20-30 foot jumps at the snowpark.   Although, now I am riding a pump track bike like a kid, so ...  :dontknow:  :scratch head:

 

Maybe, I haven't learned anything.  HAHA

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Oddly enough, via bike accidents.  I learned at age six or so when I wiped out on the gravely road in front of our house, then again as a teenager as I slid on gravel, then again as an adult when I endoed on a nasty bolt-on speed bump.  :rolleyes:

 

Bikes.  Fun, and mostly good for you, but dangerous!

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Bikes.  Fun, and mostly good for you, but dangerous!

 

Very true.  My doctors are always torn between advising me to stop riding and encouraging me to continue riding.  The current consensus seems to be that I should continue because my overall health for a man my age seems to be pretty good, due in some part to my riding, I guess.   :)

 

If I could just stop the "dangerous" stuff...    :(  

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Oddly enough, via bike accidents.  I learned at age six or so when I wiped out on the gravely road in front of our house, then again as a teenager as I slid on gravel, then again as an adult when I endoed on a nasty bolt-on speed bump.  :rolleyes:

 

Bikes.  Fun, and mostly good for you, but dangerous!

I have had many close calls throughout my fun and my jobs... I still feel that I am immortal until my last day on this earth... What does not kill you makes you stronger, and lets you know not to do it again unless you think you can master the task :) 

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I haven't had any close calls myself. A good friend got brain cancer and will die soon. Just this week she stopped waking up. I hope I have a chance to say goodbye. I know she won't be able to respond, but I believe she can hear me. She's only 37. :(

Her plight made me realize any of us can go at any time.

That sucks. I lost a friend to brain cancer almost 10 years ago, and it was just awful to see happen.

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When I crashed my bike eight years ago and couldn't get back up.  Snapped the ball off my hip bone.  It took three months to recover.  They told me it would take at least six weeks and I thought to myself, yes for a normal person but I'll be back on the bike in four weeks.

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I haven't had any close calls myself. A good friend got brain cancer and will die soon. Just this week she stopped waking up. I hope I have a chance to say goodbye. I know she won't be able to respond, but I believe she can hear me. She's only 37. :(

Her plight made me realize any of us can go at any time.

 

I am sorry to hear about your friend.  

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When I was 10 or 11, I fell out of a tree playing hide and seek.  Fell down through the branches, struck my head on several and ended up unconscious for an extended period of time.  (long enough for the other kids to get my parents)

 

Oh yeah..., and I was in a Batman costume at the time

 

I was like "Batman never gets knocked out, this sucks"

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Serious answer. From a very young age; from as far back as my memories take me, I was terrified I was going to die; something was going to kill me.

It wasn't until I was in my very late teens and early twenties when I chose to live a life consistent with what I believed my physical gender required of me that I discovered that invincibility you reference. I began living life as a thrill seeker; a fighter, an adventurer and quite often with reckless abandon. I grew in strength and stamina and skill exponentially and I was addicted to it. And I kept wanting more - greater challenges, bigger thrills. I've done some stupid things.

By my 30s my body began feeling the weight of what I was putting it through. And a long buried person began seeking life.

In 2004, my mortality stared me in the face. A bout of pancreatitis in June that the doctor thought would kill me followed by the beginning (that autumn) of what would become a four year jaunt into a neurological nightmare if of sorts; losing motor skills, equilibrium, speaking, and a whole range of neuropathies, in and out of testing facilities, neuro specialists, etc and ending with being told this 'thing' would eventually incapacitate me, well I was taken down a few pegs. Seems I could fail. So, that year I said to heck with the docs and tests and crap and I registered for the Mt Washington climb and trained my azz off for it. And I did it. Sucky time, but I rode to the top.

I cannot do things as I once did. But I am choosing to live as best I can.

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