Jump to content

Should we even be talking about reducing meat consumption while people are playing golf?


Randomguy
 Share

Go to solution Solved by bikeman564™,

Recommended Posts

All those damn golf courses in the desert, or anywhere, really, go through sooooo much water.  I will not be guilt-tripped into not eating meat because of some namby pamby hippie sentiment BS about "not eating meat to save the planet" hogwash that is getting spread by PETA and other assmunch groups while golf courses dump billions of gallons of water so boring people can toddle off after some little white ball that they suck at hitting juuuuuuussst right.

Discus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



1 minute ago, Randomguy said:

All those damn golf courses in the desert, or anywhere, really, go through sooooo much water.  I will not be guilt-tripped into not eating meat because of some namby pamby hippie sentiment BS about "not eating meat to save the planet" hogwash that is getting spread by PETA and other assmunch groups while golf courses dump billions of gallons of water so boring people can toddle off after some little white ball that they suck at hitting juuuuuuussst right.

Discus.

Are PETA folks also golfers?  They don't seem to fit the demographic.

What part of "meat is murder" are you missing from the PETA message?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Razors Edge said:

Are PETA folks also golfers?  They don't seem to fit the demographic.

What part of "meat is murder" are you missing from the PETA message?

I like the tasty murder part best.

I won't reduce meat consumption over the made up water issue.  There is plenty of water, just look at the ocean right out your door!  

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

I like the tasty murder part best.

I won't reduce meat consumption over the made up water issue.  There is plenty of water, just look at the ocean right out your door!  

And that's just clear and logical thinking!  But you might just drop the PETA part of the first post and focus on the why can't we ruin the Earth in more ways rather than fewer ways side of the argument.  It really makes no sense - as I have been arguing here for a while - to do any of the bullshit folks seem to think is good.  I advocate dumping motor oil right into the sewer.  I regularly advocate for chucking trash out the car window, and I say folks should never pick up a dog poop! All that is just wasted energy. Live a little, and screw the Millennials and their crotch fruit!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

And that's just clear and logical thinking!  But you might just drop the PETA part of the first post and focus on the why can't we ruin the Earth in more ways rather than fewer ways side of the argument.  It really makes no sense - as I have been arguing here for a while - to do any of the bullshit folks seem to think is good.  I advocate dumping motor oil right into the sewer.  I regularly advocate for chucking trash out the car window, and I say folks should never pick up a dog poop! All that is just wasted energy. Live a little, and screw the Millennials and their crotch fruit!

You are a MONSTER!  Just like DH, doncha know....

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

All those damn golf courses in the desert, or anywhere, really, go through sooooo much water.  I will not be guilt-tripped into not eating meat because of some namby pamby hippie sentiment BS about "not eating meat to save the planet" hogwash that is getting spread by PETA and other assmunch groups while golf courses dump billions of gallons of water so boring people can toddle off after some little white ball that they suck at hitting juuuuuuussst right.

Discus.

I don't worry about meat production since it is much less a CO2 emissions problem than autos and power plants and those two things are strongly headed in green directions. See the EPA's breakdown at bottom.

If I lived in much of the country outside the Mid-Atlantic, I'd be much more worried about fresh water.

Fresh water is already a major problem in some areas: Lake Mead in Nevada is 145 feet lower than 20 years ago and is expected to continue to sink.  A few years back, some ships in Lake Superior couldn't dock because the water was too low to reach them.  In some SE towns, water is being trucked in because the subterranean water levels have dropped so much.  The Ogallala Aquifer under the center of the US has dropped so much that farmers who used to dig 40' deep wells are now digging 400' deep wells.

With Global Warming - whether you think it's manmade or otherwise - looking very likely to progress, it would be in America's best interest to do a lot of research in the cheap desalination of sea water and more effective irrigation practices.  75% of fresh water in America is used for irrigation and 50% of that evaporates with current usage.

EPA's CO2 emissions by source:

The primary sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States are:

  • Transportation (29 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – The transportation sector generates the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation primarily come from burning fossil fuel for our cars, trucks, ships, trains, and planes. Over 90 percent of the fuel used for transportation is petroleum based, which includes primarily gasoline and diesel.2
  • Electricity production (25 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Electricity production generates the second largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Approximately 62 percent of our electricity comes from burning fossil fuels, mostly coal and natural gas.3
  • Industry (23 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from industry primarily come from burning fossil fuels for energy, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from certain chemical reactions necessary to produce goods from raw materials.
  • Commercial and Residential (13 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from businesses and homes arise primarily from fossil fuels burned for heat, the use of certain products that contain greenhouse gases, and the handling of waste.
  • Agriculture (10 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture come from livestock such as cows, agricultural soils, and rice production.
  • Land Use and Forestry (12 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Land areas can act as a sink (absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere) or a source of greenhouse gas emissions. In the United States, since 1990, managed forests and other lands are a net sink, i.e., they have absorbed more CO2 from the atmosphere than they emit.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

And that's just clear and logical thinking!  But you might just drop the PETA part of the first post and focus on the why can't we ruin the Earth in more ways rather than fewer ways side of the argument.  It really makes no sense - as I have been arguing here for a while - to do any of the bullshit folks seem to think is good.  I advocate dumping motor oil right into the sewer.  I regularly advocate for chucking trash out the car window, and I say folks should never pick up a dog poop! All that is just wasted energy. Live a little, and screw the Millennials and their crotch fruit!

I put my dog poop in the motor oil and pour it all into the sewer.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With two major companies already producing semi-decent plant products that imitate meat, I wonder how long before we get stuff with a taste and texture just as good as meat but healthier and cheaper?

Meanwhile, my pork Carnitas today, my beef Santa Maria BBQ tomorrow, and my chicken soup and ham & bean soup later on will bridge the gap between now and then!  And if Martha Stewart puts Italian Sausage in her Savory Fall Stew, it must be ok.

On more rationalization: I had one vegetarian cousin who died in her 60's.  Meanwhile my late 99, 92, and 90 year-old aunts and my two non-smoking, light-drinking uncles who both lived to 88 all ate meat!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

Water is renewable. I evaporates then falls back down :)

It is not a water problem, it is a profit problem.  When it becomes profitable to desalinate water, then the problem will be 'magically' solved.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

I don't worry about meat production since it is much less a CO2 emissions problem than autos and power plants and those two things are strongly headed in green directions. See the EPA's breakdown at bottom.

If I lived in much of the country outside the Mid-Atlantic, I'd be much more worried about fresh water.

Fresh water is already a major problem in some areas: Lake Mead in Nevada is 145 feet lower than 20 years ago and is expected to continue to sink.  A few years back, some ships in Lake Superior couldn't dock because the water was too low to reach them.  In some SE towns, water is being trucked in because the subterranean water levels have dropped so much.  The Ogallala Aquifer under the center of the US has dropped so much that farmers who used to dig 40' deep wells are now digging 400' deep wells.

With Global Warming - whether you think it's manmade or otherwise - looking very likely to progress, it would be in America's best interest to do a lot of research in the cheap desalination of sea water and more effective irrigation practices.  75% of fresh water in America is used for irrigation and 50% of that evaporates with current usage.

EPA's CO2 emissions by source:

The primary sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States are:

  • Transportation (29 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – The transportation sector generates the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation primarily come from burning fossil fuel for our cars, trucks, ships, trains, and planes. Over 90 percent of the fuel used for transportation is petroleum based, which includes primarily gasoline and diesel.2
  • Electricity production (25 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Electricity production generates the second largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Approximately 62 percent of our electricity comes from burning fossil fuels, mostly coal and natural gas.3
  • Industry (23 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from industry primarily come from burning fossil fuels for energy, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from certain chemical reactions necessary to produce goods from raw materials.
  • Commercial and Residential (13 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from businesses and homes arise primarily from fossil fuels burned for heat, the use of certain products that contain greenhouse gases, and the handling of waste.
  • Agriculture (10 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture come from livestock such as cows, agricultural soils, and rice production.
  • Land Use and Forestry (12 percent of 2019 greenhouse gas emissions) – Land areas can act as a sink (absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere) or a source of greenhouse gas emissions. In the United States, since 1990, managed forests and other lands are a net sink, i.e., they have absorbed more CO2 from the atmosphere than they emit.

Re the desalination plants, we have seen the surf rider foundation & other groups fight the desalination plants as they discharge the super salty waste water back into the ocean.

It seems a no win situation,  not enough water for people or saltier water for fish...

We just cleared numerous lawsuits for a desalination plant in SoCal.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

Re the desalination plants, we have seen the surf rider foundation & other groups fight the desalination plants as they discharge the super salty waste water back into the ocean.

It seems a no win situation,  not enough water for people or saltier water for fish...

We just cleared numerous lawsuits for a desalination plant in SoCal.  

How dare you drag actual consequences into this topic!  You MONSTER!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, jsharr said:

I put my dog poop in the motor oil and pour it all into the sewer.

Hopefully in some dirty plastic wrap or an old single use water bottle.  Styrofoam works in a pinch, but that is funner to burn in a campfire using old growth wood.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

You are a MONSTER!  Just like DH, doncha know....

BTW, if you give me your new address, I can focus my "greening" in your general area.  Honestly, I'm up in the NJ/NY area fairly regularly during non-COVID times, so saving up some stuff to spread around your part of town is not really an inconvenience. 

And, also, have I mentioned cannibalism has always gotten a bad rap.  It solves quite a few problems while feeding folks at the same time. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

does it have a sunny side up egg on it?

No, but I thought about it.  No bun.  I added cheese (NOT Swiss), then topped with mayonnaise, bbq sauce, and yellow mustard, and served with sliced up a big dill pickle halfwise and then in slices, plus sauerkraut,

It rocked.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

And, also, have I mentioned cannibalism has always gotten a bad rap.  It solves quite a few problems while feeding folks at the same time. 

You totally redeemed yourself with that reply.

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

 

And, also, have I mentioned cannibalism has always gotten a bad rap.  It solves quite a few problems while feeding folks at the same time. 

Humans make a delicious sausage.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

You totally redeemed yourself with that reply.

I don't get any of the "I'll eat this, but I won't eat that" mentality.  It is bonkers.  The only stuff I won't eat is the stuff that doesn't taste good.  I ain't wasting my food time on crappy tasting food, so if they come up with a delicious "Grass-fed, organic North Dakota farmer sausage", I'll try it.  If it's good, I'll recommend it.  Why are we wasting time not eating from the whole spectrum of options????  Any reasonable answer will do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, ChrisL said:

Re the desalination plants, we have seen the surf rider foundation & other groups fight the desalination plants as they discharge the super salty waste water back into the ocean.

It seems a no win situation,  not enough water for people or saltier water for fish...

We just cleared numerous lawsuits for a desalination plant in SoCal.  

Take all the water out of the ocean and sell the sea salt to the hippies. They all know that sea salt is much healthier than regular salt that came from dried up ancient seas, unless it is pink and then it is the healthiest salt of all.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Longjohn said:

Take all the water out of the ocean and sell the sea salt to the hippies. They all know that sea salt is much healthier than regular salt that came from dried up ancient seas, unless it is pink and then it is the healthiest salt of all.

Hippies can't be the only ones rowing the oars :(  Or, maybe, rowing the oars in the right direction. 

With regards to salt, the Frenchies do seem to show us that salt has terroir, so I have to trust them and their refined palates on that aspect of it.  We, however, have just the regular varieties of salt - iodized, kosher, sea, and lite.  Generally, it is all mostly for cooking and sea for seasoning.  But, darn it, I want to use the pink himilayan stuff that has been in the spice cabinet for years waiting for a reason to shine!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

But, darn it, I want to use the pink himilayan stuff that has been in the spice cabinet for years waiting for a reason to shine!

Better check the expiration date on that. It’s been in the ground for brazillions of years but once harvested is only good for a couple years. You might need to throw that out and buy fresh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Longjohn said:

Better check the expiration date on that. It’s been in the ground for brazillions of years but once harvested is only good for a couple years. You might need to throw that out and buy fresh.

Exactly my worry!  :frantics:  My salt might go bad! :angry:

:D

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...