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16 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

Wth is Canada Day?  Do you all have to go bang mounties or beavers and chug maple syrup while playing hockey?

Yup that’s pretty much it. Butter tarts and poutine should factor in too 

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Keep in mind, I am a happy Canadian. Glad to be part of my country even with a history of serious tragedies and ordinary daily triumphs. I still believe with a country of peace, there is still a good base to move forward into the future.  

I dropped by this informal memorial near city hall, that's been around for several wks. I just never walked up to it until today.  This is after I cycled by this morning, without knowing in advance of an outdoor gathering 1/4 km. away from this memorial of local aboriginal group gathered in memory of residential school children deaths. From a distance, they were wearing their signature orange T-shirts...that various groups nationally have been/are wearing in solidarity.

 

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2 minutes ago, Rattlecan said:

Butter tarts and poutine should factor in too 

Poutine! Yes, please. 
 

We brought a bag of poutine flavored Ruffles chips back from Canada as a souvenir. 
 

But, now that I think about it… the stores here are selling cheese curds, now. I could be making poutine!

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42 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

Keep in mind, I am a happy Canadian. Glad to be part of my country even with a history of serious tragedies and ordinary daily triumphs. I still believe with a country of peace, there is still a good base to move forward into the future.  

I dropped by this informal memorial near city hall, that's been around for several wks. I just never walked up to it until today.  This is after I cycled by this morning, without knowing in advance of an outdoor gathering 1/4 km. away from this memorial of local aboriginal group gathered in memory of residential school children deaths. From a distance, they were wearing their signature orange T-shirts...that various groups nationally have been/are wearing in solidarity.

 

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Every country has committed atrocities so I don't single out Canada on that.  We have also done far more to recognize our First Nations as the original citizens and have compensated most of the nations very well.  There are exceptions and there is still work to be done but the past is the past.  None of us were here to take part in it and none of us bear privileges not available to every other Canadian.  The self loathing of the past must stop.  

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There is a place in Omaha that makes duck, duck, goose. Poutine with the potatoes fried in duck fat, some shredded duck meat and a gooseberry drizzle on top of the gravy. Forever grateful to the friend who told me about it!

48 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

Poutine! Yes, please. 
 

We brought a bag of poutine flavored Ruffles chips back from Canada as a souvenir. 
 

But, now that I think about it… the stores here are selling cheese curds, now. I could be making poutine!

 

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1 minute ago, MoseySusan said:

The pieces I’ve read are critical of the church.

There is a major push in Canada right now to erase the history of the nation.  Tearing down the statues of the founding Prime Minister because he was one of the implementers of  residential schools.  The original intent of the schools was a lot less sinister.  They were an attempt to "civilize" and assimilate the native youth into the European culture of the nation.  While churches do a lot of good, left unchecked, they can do a lot of bad.  Sir John A MacDonald didn't build the schools as a place to abuse, rape, beat and neglect native youth.  When protesting the past, it is also important to view it from the eyes of the era. 

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6 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

to erase the history of the nation.

Also to shift narratives to become inclusive of perspective for everyone involved. 
 

Statues are an artifact of a time and place. They’re rarely erected during the lives of the people they portray. Taking them down is an adjustment in preference of which artifacts will signpost for the next generation. I guarantee that two generations from now will not want for all the details about the founders who brought their vision of civilization to Canada regardless of whether there’s a statue. 

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8 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

Also to shift narratives to become inclusive of perspective for everyone involved. 
 

Statues are an artifact of a time and place. They’re rarely erected during the lives of the people they portray. Taking them down is an adjustment in preference of which artifacts will signpost for the next generation. I guarantee that two generations from now will not want for all the details about the founders who brought their vision of civilization to Canada regardless of whether there’s a statue. 

I will stand apart on that assertion.  There have been many generations that observe the past, some pay homage and some view it with disdain.  The current "woke" generation doesn't speak for all. 

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25 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

 The current "woke" generation doesn't speak for all. 

Apparently, neither does the previous. 
In my backyard is a wild rose of some sort; I’m not sure exactly what it’s called. mr. picked it out. What I do know is that it’s planted to mark the burial site of our dog Sapphire. I see the roses in bloom and think of him, “securing the perimeter” every time we let him outside. Nobody else knows he’s buried there. #2 child thought he’s buried at the opposite end of the yard. And when we’re gone from this house, the next owners won’t know. Nor the next, if the house is still here. Each successive occupant will make of this space whatever they see fit. 
Similarly, I’ve been reading Churchill’s history books about Great Britain, and he often refers to archeological findings of burned timber’s, etc. that are evidence of a place having been sacked and burned to the ground, or some such. 
My point is that we lose a lot to the passing of time. Why not simply allow for people to grieve, and to dig around, and to interpret, and to remind us who are living that we are seeking to do better by each other. 

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3 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

Apparently, neither does the previous. 
In my backyard is a wild rose of some sort; I’m not sure exactly what it’s called. mr. picked it out. What I do know is that it’s planted to mark the burial site of our dog Sapphire. I see the roses in bloom and think of him, “securing the perimeter” every time we let him outside. Nobody else knows he’s buried there. #2 child though he’s buried at the opposite end of the yard. And when we’re gone from this house, the next owners won’t know. Nor the next, if the house is still here. Each successive occupant will make of this space whatever they see fit. 
Similarly, I’ve been reading Churchill’s history books about Great Britain, and he often refers to archeological findings of burned timber’s, etc. that are evidence of a place having been sacked and burned to the ground, or some such. 
My point is that we lose a lot to the passing of time. Why not simply allow for people to grieve, and to dig around, and to interpret, and to remind us who are living that we are seeking to do better by each other. 

I understand but by that same line of thought, why is an entire month dedicated the LGBTQ community with flags, marches and socially misguided behaviour?  They are assaulting many who are unaccepting of it for a variety of reasons.  Canada was founded at a cost, as was the US.  You can't change that.  People should learn to be offended and have enough respect for one another to at least be tolerant of their beliefs.  My generation and older are equally offended by the likes of those wanting to tear things down.  By the way, pretty much everything the left now detests in Canada, was initiated against the will of the right, including the name "Canada Day" and the current flag.  You can't be fair to all and you can't make everyone happy.  We can go back and adapt the tolerance of bygone era's though.  That is what we should be doing. 

Happy Dominion Day.  

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29 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

My point is that we lose a lot to the passing of time. Why not simply allow for people to grieve, and to dig around, and to interpret, and to remind us who are living that we are seeking to do better by each other. 

:mellow: I agree Susan...grieving or at least witnessing grief as a bystander is a simple act of respect and reminder to help one (if one is willing) to act better for one another in the future.

For non-Indians....they need to be reminded that the some of the history years of residential school children is still very close to us now.  There are late boomers right now  and some grandparents who went to those schools, have clear memories, bear witness to that history....the trauma of physical abuse and stripping their identity as a child, is real. 

Grief is not just for dead children buried, but also for those who survived physical abuse and saw things at a very young age that we can't imagine. The grief...for survivors was a lost childhood.

For myself the duality of recognizing historic tragedy yet also celebrating the peaceful freedom of a present democracy in Canada, is part of life itself.  Grief and gratitude all rolled together.

 

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2 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

:mellow: I agree Susan...grieving or at least witnessing grief as a bystander is a simple act of respect and reminder to help one (if one is willing) to act better for one another in the future.

For non-Indians....they need to be reminded that the some of the history years of residential school children is still very close to us now.  There are late boomers right now  and some grandparents who went to those schools, have clear memories, bear witness to that history....the trauma of physical abuse and stripping their identity as a child, is real. 

Grief is not just for dead children buried, but also for those who survived physical abuse and saw things at a very young age that we can't imagine. The grief...for survivors was a lost childhood.

For myself the duality of recognizing historic tragedy yet also celebrating the peaceful freedom of a present democracy as a Canada, is part of life itself.  Grief and gratitude all rolled together.

 

AS one whose wife and children have Indian status, we are very aware of the injustices of the past.  My wife has had family members in residential schools, some of whom never returned. They don't dwell on it at all.  They appreciate what Canada is, not what it was.    Statues don't offend them as they are just statues.  If you forget the past, you are bound to recreate it. 

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2 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

For sure. And mass/unmarked graves of children is never a good optic. 

There is a lot of investigative work yet to be done.  It may turn up hideous things but it may also be an innocent necessity of time.  This is why I don't jump to judgement. 

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3 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

For sure. And mass/unmarked graves of children is never a good optic. 

Youch!  

In 'Murica where the inbred skull-fucked abound in great numbers, those old school statues are rallied around constantly and loudly to unite and incite the lowest common denominator.  If they were looked at as simply relics of a bygone era, most folks wouldn't care.  There are a lot of overzealous on both sides, though, and absolutely no one with a lick of sense likes a zealot.   Can't whitewash history as much as people try.  I think Columbus was a great guy, for example, and no different from any of the other explorers of that day and age.  I bet they ate horses (but NOT canadian bacon), too.

Anyway, I watched a Letterkenny episode about changing a school's mascot name that I felt was super appropriate for its thoughtful consideration of reasons to do such a thing or not do such a thing and the thinking behind things.  In the end, the folks from Letterkenny deemed it no big thing either way and just moved on instead of making everything a mountain of madness, then they drank beer and fought somebody.  Actually, that last bit sounds like every episode they do, now that I think about it.

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48 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

There is a lot of investigative work yet to be done.  It may turn up hideous things but it may also be an innocent necessity of time.  This is why I don't jump to judgement. 

THere was no good reason for the children to be buried at a school site vs. telling the parent(s) (which many were not told) so that they could bring the child's body back for their choice of burial. Just wrong.  Of course, the school authorities probably didn't want to tell parents how/why their children died and hence, zero info. to parent at the time.

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6 hours ago, Rattlecan said:

Canada day!

For most the Americans here who most likely don't know the history.   (including myself)

Canada Day, formerly (until 1982) Dominion Day, the national holiday of Canada. The possibility of a confederation between the colonies of British North America was discussed throughout the mid-1800s. On July 1, 1867, a dominion was formed through the British North America Act as approved by the British Parliament. It consisted of territories then called Upper and Lower Canada and of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The act divided Canada into the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and it included provisions for other colonies and territories to join in the future, which made possible the growth of Canada into its present form. The act served as Canada’s constitution until 1982, and July 1 was celebrated as Dominion Day. Canada Day is celebrated on Thursday, July 1, 2021.

By terms of the Canada Act of 1982, the British North America Act was repatriated from the British to the Canadian Parliament, and Canada became a fully independent country. At the same time, the name of the national holiday was changed to Canada Day. It is celebrated with parades, displays of the flag, the singing of the national anthem, “O Canada,” and fireworks. When July 1 falls on a Sunday, the holiday is observed on the following day.
 

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27 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

By terms of the Canada Act of 1982, the British North America Act was repatriated from the British to the Canadian Parliament, and Canada became a fully independent country. At the same time, the name of the national holiday was changed to Canada Day. It is celebrated with parades, displays of the flag, the singing of the national anthem, “O Canada,” and fireworks. When July 1 falls on a Sunday, the holiday is observed on the following day.
 

The repatriation of now the Canada Act of 1982, which included the Canadian Charter of Rights, was steered by former PM Pierre Trudeau, Justiin's father.  In the area of Canadian constitutional law, it was an important point in Canadian legal history.

A friend of mine, went to Ottawa at Parliament Hill, to witness the signing.  She was a passionate Liberal...and political science graduate.

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4 hours ago, groupw said:

There is a place in Omaha that makes duck, duck, goose. Poutine with the potatoes fried in duck fat, some shredded duck meat and a gooseberry drizzle on top of the gravy. Forever grateful to the friend who told me about it!

 

Why?  Sounds like he or she is trying to kill you!

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38 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

Why?  Sounds like he or she is trying to kill you!

It’s not like I eat it every day! I’ve had it maybe 3 times in the last 5 years. Just a decadent treat once in a while. 

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