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Who were your hero’s?


ChrisL
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As a kid I idolized numerous cyclists like Greg Lemond, Jan Raas, Hennie Kuiper & Joop Zoetemelk (look em up) but they weren’t really hero’s.

But in looking back, my hero’s were SFC Snyder, Heron & Ratliff. Sgt Bishop and First Sergeant Wasano.  I wanted to be like them. I wanted to be the type of leader & person they were. I wanted to  influence others like they influenced me. 

Much of who I am today is because of them. Those men were my hero’s.

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no real heros... just a lot of people that disappointed me over the years once I grew up and realized they were just normal people that I can do the same thing as once I got bigger. 

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My father passed when I was 10.  I guess the two men who stepped in to shelter and console us over the next few months became my heros.  One was my cousin who attended West Point before his career in the Air Force as a fighter pilot and the other was an uncle we stayed with for a few weeks who introduced me to racing.

My real hero though was my father.

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I didn't really have heros I guess, but when I was in high school I worked in the sheet metal/AC shop where my Dad was the VP of the company.  I worked on sites dealing with  customers and clients who had no idea who I was, and I got to listen to people talk about my Dad.  I remember thinking "I don't know where life will lead me, but I know I want people to talk about me behind my back like they talk about my Dad"  That is as close as I have to a hero.

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When I was a kid, my father was a Yankees fan so I was, too, and my biggest hero was Mickey Mantle.  When I was a young teen, the Yankees played the Orioles in Baltimore, Mantle was getting older and played left field, and some bar's club my Dad was in got tickets near the left field foul pole.  As the gane progressed and knowing he was leading off the next inning, when the Orioles made their third out, I yelled, "Hit one out, Mick!"

He looked over in my direction.  He then proceeded to hit a home run!

That was my closest connection to my biggest childhood hero.

Within a couple years, Mick and the Yankees were losing their domination and I decided it was time to start rooting for the hometown team like virtually everyone else in high school.

That was 1966 and Brooks Robinson became my new hero.  That year, the Orioles won their first AL Pennant and beat the highly favored Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale-led Dodgers 4-0 in the World Series.

My childhood heroes were mostly baseball, football, and basketball stars.

When I was 12 another hero of mine, Dallas Cowboys QB "Dandy" Don Meredith, did a series of commercials on TV for Shell Oil.

He would say stuff like, "It used to take all day to oil railroad cars until Shell chemists developed a lubricated sheet that slides into place and reduces the time to one hour."

I decided I wanted to be a chemist despite the fact I, a very poor kid, couldn't see any way I be able to go to college. But where there's a will there's a way. Sixteen years and two degrees later, I was promoted to chief chemist for process development for Minerec Corp, a subsidiary of Dow Chemical.

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