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Crash Course In Singlespeeding


denniS
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https://bikepacking.com/plan/crash-course-in-singlespeeding/

Curious to understand what the fuss is all about, Neil has been trying his hand at single speeding throughout the past couple of months. In this video, he shares the top 10 things he’s learned during his single-speed crash course…

Chances are, quite a few of our readers have tried singlespeed mountain biking at some point in time. For those who have pedaled with one gear, you’re well aware of the simplicity, meditative quality, and completely different style of riding that a singlespeed bike provides. Inspired by the Alexandera Houchin’s efforts over the years, Neil decided to try it out for himself. In this video, he walks through the 10 lessons he learned in the process. Watch it below, then scroll down for a list of relevant links and products.

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I have to admit, I kind of like riding my full rigid single speed 29er MTB more than my geared full suspension bike. Also, some of the best century rides I've done on the road have been with my Milwaukee fixed gear. For some reason one speed just feels natural to me.

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14 hours ago, Longjohn said:

On my birthday ride I did the first fifty miles in a single gear. I was getting tired so I did the last 22 miles in one gear lower. I like gears, great invention. You don’t have to use them but it’s nice to have them.

Exactly. Every single bike in my garage can be ridden as a SS.  Pick a gear combo, and go. It's not a black/white or SS/geared or the like choice.  If I'm riding, I can make a choice to either ride using gears or ride using just one combination.  I don't get the arguments against having as many as 24(!) options at one's fingertips before & during a ride vs 24 (or more) options before a ride.  If the video author picked a 52/17 and set it up as 52/17, how is that any different (or easier or better) than someone on a geared bike just changing to the 52 big ring and the 17 tooth cog and then riding in that all day? :scratchhead:  I get the "less maintenance" or "less to break" or even the "I can't be trusted to not change gears if I had them" perspective, but that's all arguing around the periphery. 

I definitely see how folks decide to convert old and decrepit bikes to "city" or knock-around SS bikes.  Take an old and malfunctioning drivetrain and simplify for cost and maintenance reasons - especially in flat DC or NYC or other cities. That's an obvious use for SS conversions.

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There is a guy in our group who is an absolute beast on the bike even in his late 60s. He rides 40-90 miles almost daily on his fat bike.  When he shows up for Tuesday group rides, it's usually on his SS. On our routes, we have a few sprint points just for fun. I was on my roadie, but decided to try to match his gearing on my bike and stay in it. I got to where his cadence and mine were almost identical at the same speed. It was a less traveled road so we could safely ride 2-wide. He and I were pulling the group as we got near a favorite sprint point. I sped up a little. Then he sped up a little more and I returned the favor. We kept doing that back and forth. The temptation to shift was there, but I kept in the gear. I forget our speed, but he finally yelled "I'm spun out!". I pulled away and won the sprint. 

One of the guys who was right behind us said they saw what was developing and decided to enjoy the show. They figured Bob would eventually bury me. "Dude, you were spinning like 140s!" When I got home, Strava said it was 150...

Since I bought the Varsity, I found it's good to find a gear in a general area and stick with it. The temptation isn't there to find that "Goldilocks" gear that I have on the 11-speed cassette. 

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The only fat bikes I see being ridden are E-fatbikes. I was stopped taking pictures in the middle of the woods yesterday and I heard this strange noise. What on earth do I hear? Up over the hill comes two fat bikes with equally fat riders. As they rode past I started singing “ I don’t want a pickle”

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53 minutes ago, groupw said:

There is a guy in our group who is an absolute beast on the bike even in his late 60s. He rides 40-90 miles almost daily on his fat bike.  When he shows up for Tuesday group rides, it's usually on his SS. On our routes, we have a few sprint points just for fun. I was on my roadie, but decided to try to match his gearing on my bike and stay in it. I got to where his cadence and mine were almost identical at the same speed. It was a less traveled road so we could safely ride 2-wide. He and I were pulling the group as we got near a favorite sprint point. I sped up a little. Then he sped up a little more and I returned the favor. We kept doing that back and forth. The temptation to shift was there, but I kept in the gear. I forget our speed, but he finally yelled "I'm spun out!". I pulled away and won the sprint. 

Maybe that guy needs to ride a SS a bit more and build his form?  Dropped by a non-SS guy?? Ouch. Ego crusher :happyanim:

But, yeah, it is fun to do stuff like that.  And, honestly, all snark aside, I love ANYBODY on a bike (or whatever) trying to enjoy being out and in the world.  For every person I see out, there are likely dozens who spent the day inside, sitting around, or other not-good-for-them, not good for all of us behavior.  Ride, run, walk, skateboard, skip, whatever - get out, have fun, enjoy the world.

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57 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Maybe that guy needs to ride a SS a bit more and build his form?  Dropped by a non-SS guy?? Ouch. Ego crusher :happyanim:

But, yeah, it is fun to do stuff like that.  And, honestly, all snark aside, I love ANYBODY on a bike (or whatever) trying to enjoy being out and in the world.  For every person I see out, there are likely dozens who spent the day inside, sitting around, or other not-good-for-them, not good for all of us behavior.  Ride, run, walk, skateboard, skip, whatever - get out, have fun, enjoy the world.

There is a Spinervals trainer video called "Sweating Buckets". It's an old video, but a great workout. We used to do this at the old cycling shop on Tuesday nights.  Towards the end is some high cadence spinning intervals. Coach Troy makes the comment, "some people can get their cadence to 170. You might not be able to do that". I always take it personally. My best is 185 if I remember right. 

I'm with you. Anyone riding is way ahead of those on the couch. I sometimes have to remind myself I used to be a couch surfer and need to remember my humble beginnings. 

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5 minutes ago, groupw said:

There is a Spinervals trainer video called "Sweating Buckets". It's an old video, but a great workout. We used to do this at the old cycling shop on Tuesday nights.  Towards the end is some high cadence spinning intervals. Coach Troy makes the comment, "some people can get their cadence to 170. You might not be able to do that". I always take it personally. My best is 185 if I remember right. 

I'm with you. Anyone riding is way ahead of those on the couch. I sometimes have to remind myself I used to be a couch surfer and need to remember my humble beginnings. 

My max cadence has, to my knowledge, never been over 140.  I've seen higher, but doubt its accuracy.  I will generally hit 120s and maybe 130s as a MAX, but that has to be only for 1% of a ride.  170? 185? Man, that would be interesting to attempt.  I'm not even sure how I would attack that.  Up a slight climb? Flat? Downhill?  I like resistance when pedaling, so that's what I am used to. Spinning those higher numbers would be with almost no resistance and require a lot of "form" to keep it from being a messy flailing about by me. :D

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6 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

My max cadence has, to my knowledge, never been over 140.  I've seen higher, but doubt its accuracy.  I will generally hit 120s and maybe 130s as a MAX, but that has to be only for 1% of a ride.  170? 185? Man, that would be interesting to attempt.  I'm not even sure how I would attack that.  Up a slight climb? Flat? Downhill?  I like resistance when pedaling, so that's what I am used to. Spinning those higher numbers would be with almost no resistance and require a lot of "form" to keep it from being a messy flailing about by me. :D

Yes. It's just spin for spinning sake almost no resistance. Small ring and 2nd biggest cog. You have to drop your hips and pull the pedals more than push to make it work. 

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Just now, groupw said:

Yes. It's just spin for spinning sake almost no resistance. Small ring and 2nd biggest cog. You have to drop your hips and pull the pedals more than push to make it work. 

The nice thing about a powermeter is it shows the correlation pretty well between cadence and power output.  I'll often drop down a gear and the lower resistance allows me to spin faster, and the gain in spin - say going from 75 to 90 rpm more than makes up for the easier gear.  So, essentially, it feels the same or even easier, but the speed and power numbers go up.  Like "free" power but really just creating the power a different way that only feels easier (but may also be less fatiguing).

Spinning is a great option for many. Sure, it requires doing it properly and varies by situation, but an ability to spin a high cadence (when desired) is clearly a very good skill to have.

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I never had a cadence sensor until I bought the Garmin for my new bike. I always thought my cadence was way lower than it actually is. I like how it tells me my average cadence and my maximum cadence after every ride.

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Just now, Longjohn said:

I never had a cadence sensor until I bought the Garmin for my new bike. I always thought my cadence was way lower than it actually is. I like how it tells me my average cadence and my maximum cadence after every ride.

I'd think tall guys would struggle to get crazy high cadences, but Froome - not you height @ 6'1" - is sort of tall relative to other riders and seems to spin like a monkey!

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18 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

I'd think tall guys would struggle to get crazy high cadences, but Froome - not you height @ 6'1" - is sort of tall relative to other riders and seems to spin like a monkey!

Here is a recent ride I did.

 

I think the up hills were the high cadence and the 28mph was the down hills. 

B1E65593-78D7-47CD-BAFF-D9B2A820AE56.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

Exactly. Every single bike in my garage can be ridden as a SS.  Pick a gear combo, and go. It's not a black/white or SS/geared or the like choice.  If I'm riding, I can make a choice to either ride using gears or ride using just one combination.  I don't get the arguments against having as many as 24(!) options at one's fingertips before & during a ride vs 24 (or more) options before a ride.  If the video author picked a 52/17 and set it up as 52/17, how is that any different (or easier or better) than someone on a geared bike just changing to the 52 big ring and the 17 tooth cog and then riding in that all day? :scratchhead:  I get the "less maintenance" or "less to break" or even the "I can't be trusted to not change gears if I had them" perspective, but that's all arguing around the periphery. 

I definitely see how folks decide to convert old and decrepit bikes to "city" or knock-around SS bikes.  Take an old and malfunctioning drivetrain and simplify for cost and maintenance reasons - especially in flat DC or NYC or other cities. That's an obvious use for SS conversions.

It's pretty clear you don't mt bike. SS is not about riding a flat road in one gear. Flow trails, simplicity, limiting your braking, and improving your bike handling. Those are things to consider. 

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1 minute ago, denniS said:

It's pretty clear you don't mt bike. SS is not about riding a flat road in one gear. Flow trails, simplicity, limiting your braking, and improving your bike handling. Those are things to consider. 

You might be missing my point - on any geared bike, a rider is 100% free to choose a gear combination and stick with it.  They can embrace the flow, simplicity, braking, and handling without any mods to their bikes.  Easy peasy.  You don't HAVE to shift gears on a bike if you don't WANT to! It's not an automatic :)

I just happen to have 21 gear combos to choose from for my single speed rides - all at the throw of a thumb shifter :) 

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4 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

You might be missing my point - on any geared bike, a rider is 100% free to choose a gear combination and stick with it.  They can embrace the flow, simplicity, braking, and handling without any mods to their bikes.  Easy peasy.  You don't HAVE to shift gears on a bike if you don't WANT to! It's not an automatic :)

I just happen to have 21 gear combos to choose from for my single speed rides - all at the throw of a thumb shifter :) 

It's about mt biking. Have you ever ridden a ss mt bike on trails?

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2 minutes ago, denniS said:

It's about mt biking. Have you ever ridden a ss mt bike on trails?

If I didn't shift, does that count? I'm still failing to make the connection of how converting a geared bike to a single gear is any different than simply picking a gear and sticking with it.  Is this a weight weenie thing? Trying to save a few ounces of a bike?  Lay off the donuts!

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4 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

If I didn't shift, does that count? I'm still failing to make the connection of how converting a geared bike to a single gear is any different than simply picking a gear and sticking with it.  Is this a weight weenie thing? Trying to save a few ounces of a bike?  Lay off the donuts!

I think it’s more of a mindset that you can’t shift.  The gear I have is the only gear I can use so I’m going to adjust my riding style to this gear.  It probably then ads to the zen like experience of a flow trail.

I have seen numerous riders on rigid SS and it seems the guys I have spoken to swear by the experience. It’s not a macho tough guy thing with them. More like a zen thing…

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5 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

I have seen numerous riders on rigid SS and it seems the guys I have spoken to swear by the experience. It’s not a macho tough guy thing with them. More like a zen thing…

Is it a case of they found SS or SS found them?!?! :scratchhead:

Luckily, I have a highly disciplined mind! If I tell it to not shift...that it can't shift...that there are no shifters...then I can get into that Zen mode instantaneously!  I'm just that good on a bike :whistle:

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10 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Is it a case of they found SS or SS found them?!?! :scratchhead:

Luckily, I have a highly disciplined mind! If I tell it to not shift...that it can't shift...that there are no shifters...then I can get into that Zen mode instantaneously!  I'm just that good on a bike :whistle:

You don't mt bike do you?

 

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19 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Just this past weekend! But, it is #3 on my list with road and gravel far ahead in time ridden!

It's obvious that you don't get it. It's weird that you argue from a position of no experience and act like an expert. 

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40 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

I think it’s more of a mindset that you can’t shift.  The gear I have is the only gear I can use so I’m going to adjust my riding style to this gear.  It probably then ads to the zen like experience of a flow trail.

I have seen numerous riders on rigid SS and it seems the guys I have spoken to swear by the experience. It’s not a macho tough guy thing with them. More like a zen thing…

My experience was only riding geared bikes for 15 years. I switched to a SS for about 10 years. It made me a better rider. You learn to brake less, use your momentum, corner better, maintain your speed. It's pretty damn fun. Ideally, I'd have two mt bikes, one geared, one SS. 

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3 minutes ago, denniS said:

It's obvious that you don't get it. It's weird that you argue from a position of no experience and act like an expert. 

What alternate Cafe have you been visiting for the past five years?!?!?!?

We have a Bikes and Gear section where actual bikes and gear talk can happen with serious responses.  In the Cafe??? No way, Jose!

But really, you just gotta roll with it!  If you can't easily explain why a SS with a 44/17 gear is any different than a geared bike using only the 44/17 gear combo, then there likely is no - or very little - difference!

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18 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

What alternate Cafe have you been visiting for the past five years?!?!?!?

We have a Bikes and Gear section where actual bikes and gear talk can happen with serious responses.  In the Cafe??? No way, Jose!

But really, you just gotta roll with it!  If you can't easily explain why a SS with a 44/17 gear is any different than a geared bike using only the 44/17 gear combo, then there likely is no - or very little - difference!

You're funny. I like how you make up "rules" as you go along. This from the guy who posts cycling stuff here. Lighten up man.

There was a video. If you didn't understand it, why comment? 

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21 minutes ago, denniS said:

My experience was only riding geared bikes for 15 years. I switched to a SS for about 10 years. It made me a better rider. You learn to brake less, use your momentum, corner better, maintain your speed. It's pretty damn fun. Ideally, I'd have two mt bikes, one geared, one SS. 

I often thought a SS cross bike would be fun but maybe a SS HT would be more fun (funner!?!?).

Bonus time is early next year and if I get a sweet bonus again maybe a SS HT is in my future.  My wife & I also like to cruise down at the beach.  She has a hybrid with flat pedals she rides so it could also serve as my beach cruiser. 
 

 

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6 minutes ago, denniS said:

You're funny. I like how you make up "rules" as you go along. This from the guy who posts cycling stuff here. Lighten up man.

There was a video. If you didn't understand it, why comment? 

I'm still waiting for the CRASH!!! 

And the use of the correct tag!

I don't ask much, Dennis!

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5 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

I often thought a SS cross bike would be fun but maybe a SS HT would be more fun (funner!?!?).

Bonus time is early next year and if I get a sweet bonus again maybe a SS HT is in my future.  My wife & I also like to cruise down at the beach.  She has a hybrid with flat pedals she rides so it could also serve as my beach cruiser. 
 

 

I've had both. I put tons of miles on them. I used the CX bike as a commuter, gravel bike, and road bike. It was great. As a year round commuter, it was awesome because of all of the snow, sand, and salt in the winter. No maintenance.

Switching to a SS mtb just made me a better rider. It's not for everyone, but it is really fun. I raced on it quite a bit. I had a Redline Monocog and then a Felt Nine Solo. I still have a lot of old parts and thought I might build one again If I found a frame that is compatible with an80 mm fork.

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I started out on a single speed, it even had a coaster brake. Then I went to a three speed, then a ten speed. Every bike I advanced to until this last one had more gears than the last one. I wish my new bike had triple  chain rings, that would be awesome. I have never said gee this bike has too many gears I think I’ll ride my old one.

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This conversation reminds me of the barefoot/minimalist/"Born to Run" runners. They felt that barefoot running, or Vibrams at most, were the only way people should be running. While they are not wrong in saying too much cushion in a shoe can do more harm than good, their way was not the only way. I bought into some of it. I studied Chi Running and the mechanics of it are what allowed me to run as much as I have. My injuries came when I ignored aspects of the mechanics. However, I never totally bought into the mystical aspects of it. 

Brooks minimalist line was the Pure series. The Pure Connect was the best running shoe I ever wore. It felt like part of my foot with just enough cushion to allow me to run long distances comfortably. But they widened the shoe and added more cushion in the 4th gen shoe because people asked for it rather than run in a shoe in Brooks line that was already built that way. The 4th gen Connect sucked. Sales of the shoe died and they discontinued rather than go back. 

When I bought my Schwinn Varsity, that was my venture into minimalist cycling. The friction shifter on the stem discourages constant shifting. I find a gear for the ride I'm on and basically stick with it. The brakes work, but not on the level of my Stradalli's Ultegra brakes. Heck, not even as well as the brakes on my Bridgestone! I adjust my riding to not shift and minimize time on the brakes. Is it a true SS? No. But I get it. I haven't watched the video, yet, but I'm getting a whole "Born to Run" vibe from the direction of this conversation. 

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5 hours ago, Longjohn said:

I never had a cadence sensor until I bought the Garmin for my new bike. I always thought my cadence was way lower than it actually is. I like how it tells me my average cadence and my maximum cadence after every ride.

I ride my road bike by cadence. When I started riding, my cadence was in the 60s. My son/coach suggested I shoot for 80, so I would adjust my gears so I could ride the smallest cog I could hold 80 rpm. Over time, I have moved my ideal cadence to 90. I found if I could hold that cadence. eventually it got easier and I could move to the next gear. Not saying it's for everyone, but I found cadence to be a useful way to be a stronger rider. 

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11 minutes ago, groupw said:

This conversation reminds me of the barefoot/minimalist/"Born to Run" runners. They felt that barefoot running, or Vibrams at most, were the only way people should be running. While they are not wrong in saying too much cushion in a shoe can do more harm than good, their way was not the only way. I bought into some of it. I studied Chi Running and the mechanics of it are what allowed me to run as much as I have. My injuries came when I ignored aspects of the mechanics. However, I never totally bought into the mystical aspects of it. 

Brooks minimalist line was the Pure series. The Pure Connect was the best running shoe I ever wore. It felt like part of my foot with just enough cushion to allow me to run long distances comfortably. But they widened the shoe and added more cushion in the 4th gen shoe because people asked for it rather than run in a shoe in Brooks line that was already built that way. The 4th gen Connect sucked. Sales of the shoe died and they discontinued rather than go back. 

When I bought my Schwinn Varsity, that was my venture into minimalist cycling. The friction shifter on the stem discourages constant shifting. I find a gear for the ride I'm on and basically stick with it. The brakes work, but not on the level of my Stradalli's Ultegra brakes. Heck, not even as well as the brakes on my Bridgestone! I adjust my riding to not shift and minimize time on the brakes. Is it a true SS? No. But I get it. I haven't watched the video, yet, but I'm getting a whole "Born to Run" vibe from the direction of this conversation. 

I remember the barefoot movement.  I actually agree with it in principle but I’d hate to step on glass or something hard. 

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1 hour ago, denniS said:

My experience was only riding geared bikes for 15 years. I switched to a SS for about 10 years. It made me a better rider. You learn to brake less, use your momentum, corner better, maintain your speed. It's pretty damn fun. Ideally, I'd have two mt bikes, one geared, one SS. 

I rode MTB for several years as well as roadie. At least twice per week for a period of 3 years.

The things you mention, could it just be that after years of riding MTB, you got better?

I mean braking less. Yes, when I got more experience on the MTB, I would break less.  Corner better? Yes, I cornered much better once I got more experience. Maintain my speed? Yes, I could maintain my speed much better with experience. Use your momentum? Yes, I used my momentum much better once I had more experience.

Once I started riding the MTB far less, if I got back on, I would be back to the need to learn how to corner, maintain speed, brake less, and use my momentum again.

I've never rode a single speed on mtb but the things you mention improving by riding a single speed on mtb, are the same things that improve when I ride my geared mtb often.  Big difference when I do and don't ride my mtb. 

So myself knowing that I improve greatly riding my mtb in those things you mention, makes me wonder if you wouldn't improve anyway after riding an mtb of any kind for 10 years. 

Put me on my mtb right now descending the long 10% grades around here, I'll descend like a first grader. Let me ride my mtb for a month, I'll descend like a high schooler. :D I'm going to improve whether I was on a ss or a geared bike.

I will say, descending on an mtb in the dirt on steep sections sure helps the roadie descending skills. :party:

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4 hours ago, Mr Beanz said:

I rode MTB for several years as well as roadie. At least twice per week for a period of 3 years.

The things you mention, could it just be that after years of riding MTB, you got better?

I mean braking less. Yes, when I got more experience on the MTB, I would break less.  Corner better? Yes, I cornered much better once I got more experience. Maintain my speed? Yes, I could maintain my speed much better with experience. Use your momentum? Yes, I used my momentum much better once I had more experience.

Once I started riding the MTB far less, if I got back on, I would be back to the need to learn how to corner, maintain speed, brake less, and use my momentum again.

I've never rode a single speed on mtb but the things you mention improving by riding a single speed on mtb, are the same things that improve when I ride my geared mtb often.  Big difference when I do and don't ride my mtb. 

So myself knowing that I improve greatly riding my mtb in those things you mention, makes me wonder if you wouldn't improve anyway after riding an mtb of any kind for 10 years. 

Put me on my mtb right now descending the long 10% grades around here, I'll descend like a first grader. Let me ride my mtb for a month, I'll descend like a high schooler. :D I'm going to improve whether I was on a ss or a geared bike.

I will say, descending on an mtb in the dirt on steep sections sure helps the roadie descending skills. :party:

I think you really need to try it to understand it. Those who have ridden SS get it, others just don't.

It's something I enjoy doing. Others don't. Don't like it, don't do it. I know my riding has improved. 

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On 10/19/2021 at 11:39 PM, UglyBob said:

I have to admit, I kind of like riding my full rigid single speed 29er MTB more than my geared full suspension bike. Also, some of the best century rides I've done on the road have been with my Milwaukee fixed gear. For some reason one speed just feels natural to me.

I can't imagine doing this with one gear. over 6000 feet of hills.

Speeds anywhere from 3 mph to 40+/

image.png

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I would like to be able to keep riding as long as possible, so I want to keep my knees in usable shape.  The more gears it has, the better I like it.  No singlespeed for me.

 

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In some European cities, there are bike racks with public, single speed bikes for riding from one rack to another for free.

I've wondered how easy they are to use.  Even back when I was a teenager in the 60's, I had graduated to a 3-speed and couldn't imagine riding a one-speed bike.

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