Jump to content

Forum chefs -sea salt va Himalayan pink salt vs kosher salt?


Philander Seabury
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am a fan of kosher salt, and good ol iodized salt.  We need iodine in our diets. I don't really use Himalayan.  It comes with such a heavy sustainability price.  It is mined.  It is a finite resource.  That salt carries a lot of miles, so I avoid it now.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

I am a fan of kosher salt, and good ol iodized salt.  We need iodine in our diets. I don't really use Himalayan.  It comes with such a heavy sustainability price.  It is mined.  It is a finite resource.  That salt carries a lot of miles, so I avoid it now.

Kosher salt is better earlier in the cooking process, and finer salt for seasoning later in the process.  We use a lot of kosher salt.  Sea salt is fine, but it does lack the iodine, so it's not the best "regular" salt option for many.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

 I love the Himalayan stuff but I do miss the sea salt that it replaced in our cupboard. 

Sea salt or Kosher (I prefer large crystal Kosher) for cooking, Himalayan for garnish (a little can go a long way) and the standard table salt for the rabble when they visit.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Kosher salt is better earlier in the cooking process, and finer salt for seasoning later in the process.  We use a lot of kosher salt.  Sea salt is fine, but it does lack the iodine, so it's not the best "regular" salt option for many.

I am a big fan of kosher salt in brownies.  They stay somewhat large chunks, so you get this salty sweet experience.  

  • Awesome 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

I had to google salt pig. That doesn't look too sanitary to me. Pouring from a box or shaker seems better to me. 

Pouring from a box is tricky. Getting the excess back in the box is hard and I tend to spill some. The salt pig is the answer. You do realize if you eat in a restaurant, all of the food is touched by human hands.

Have you ever seen The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover? 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, denniS said:

Pouring from a box is tricky. Getting the excess back in the box is hard and I tend to spill some. The salt pig is the answer. You do realize if you eat in a restaurant, all of the food is touched by human hands.

Have you ever seen The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover? 

 

Nope!  Googling now!

Holy cow, that sounds like a terribibble movie!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

I had to google salt pig. That doesn't look too sanitary to me. Pouring from a box or shaker seems better to me. 

Usually they have a top to prevent things getting in there.  They are useful, if you cook daily.  I want to just reach over and grab a pinch of salt.  They can be lovely too.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Philander Seabury said:

The pinching part is what sounds unsanitary to me. 

LOL,  never ever eat out.  It is likely many have touched your food.  If someone is preparing your meal, you would hope they have clean hands

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Philander Seabury said:

Doesn’t really bother me, just seems like if it can be easily avoided, why not do so?

Speed and ease of use is important for a fast moving kitchen.  It is hard to measure and pinch out of the container.  The salt container makes things easy and fast.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

The pinching part is what sounds unsanitary to me. 

How do you measure a pinch of salt? I measure salt using the palm of my hand. 

Have you never seen Top Chef? Watch how they season the food.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

No, I definitely have not!

Restaurants are fast paced. Imagine serving 250 meals in two hours. There is no time to grab measuring spoons. 

Watch Top Chef. Watch them work. That's why they don't use utensils to mix, they toss it in the pan. Watch him season it.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have all types of salt in my kitchen. Table, kosher, pink, and finishing sea salt. I like them all. I even have some smoked salt I made by pouring a box of kosher salt into a foil pan and putting that in the smoker for an hour or so. Very mild smoky flavor. I will experiment with longer smoke times. Try Apple instead of hickory. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Philander Seabury said:

So back to my original question, is sea salt oot of style now?  I miss it!

My Trader Joe's pink Himalayan salt is sea salt, doncha know.  I also have commodity salt for pasta water and such.  I also have fleur de sel, but I have that reserved for special occasions, and it really is all that as a finishing salt. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

My Trader Joe's pink Himalayan salt is sea salt, doncha know.  I also have commodity salt for pasta water and such.  I also have fleur de sel, but I have that reserved for special occasions, and it really is all that as a finishing salt. 

If Himalayan salt is from the Himalayas, a landlocked region. How can their salt be sea salt? Do they import water from elsewhere?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Old No. 7 said:

If Himalayan salt is from the Himalayas, a landlocked region. How can their salt be sea salt? Do they import water from elsewhere?

Well, it didn't grow on a salt plant.  As far as I can tell, all salt is technically sea salt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Randomguy said:

Well, it didn't grow on a salt plant.  As far as I can tell, all salt is technically sea salt.

As a side note (related to lithium salts):

7 Up[edit]

As with cocaine in Coca-Cola, lithium was widely marketed as one of a number of patent medicine products popular in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, and was the medicinal ingredient of a refreshment beverage. Charles Leiper Grigg, who launched his St. Louis-based company The Howdy Corporation, invented a formula for a lemon-lime soft drink in 1920. The product, originally named "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda", was launched two weeks before the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[95] It contained the mood stabilizer lithium citrate, and was one of a number of patent medicine products popular in the late-19th and early-20th centuries.[96] Its name was soon changed to 7 Up. All American beverage makers were forced to remove lithium in 1948. Despite the 1948 ban, in 1950 the Painesville Telegraph still carried an advertisement for a lithiated lemon beverage.[97]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IF the salt is dissolved in water, in a soup, etc. I don't think it makes a lot of difference.

Both kosher and sea salts contain minerals from brine which add some flavor differences and a different crunch to the solid salt.

Note that many of the exotic salts contain NO iodine, which was introduced into salt almost a century ago in the USA and drastically reduced certain illnesses including thyroid problems.

I have a container of Morton Sea Salt (no iodine) and of Morton (iodized) Lite Salt (about 50% sodium chloride, 50% potassium chloride) and, it may just be me, but I don't notice any difference on pasta, in soup, in a rub on ribs, etc.

On the containers, it says standard salt is 590 mg. of sodium per serving.  For Sea Salt it says 550 mg sodium which means about 7% of Sea Salt is other things, potentially flavors. That's a tiny amount, but apparently that's enough to taste it a little or else the TV chefs find it cool to say they use kosher salt, sea salt, etc.  Light salt has 290 mg of sodium per serving, most of the rest potassium chloride and a little iodide.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...