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Do you live where it gets "too cold to snow?"


MickinMD
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When the temperature in Central Maryland gets to the 20's and below, some people will say, "It's too cold to snow," and they're usually right - snowfall, if any, tends to be light and dry.

Tomorrow's early morning forecast seems to back that up!

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We were even colder just 2 days ago. Temperatures in Centigrade...down to -41 degrees C with windchill.  People like to argue about the windchill. No, this dangerous cold. You  must  cover/protect your face, ears, etc.

We haven't much snow since our last snowfall since this past Mon.  It's snowploughing amount and icy for driving.

I actually haven't left the house except for a short walk down block for last 3 days.

 

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3 minutes ago, Kirby said:

I've never heard of that concept, so probably not.

The atmosphere contains a lot less water vapour in cold temperatures.  Somewhere around .02% water vapour at sea level at -40 degrees.  So, no water vapour, no snow. 

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27 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

The atmosphere contains a lot less water vapour in cold temperatures.  Somewhere around .02% water vapour at sea level at -40 degrees.  So, no water vapour, no snow. 

You should reiterate your Helena experience.

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1 hour ago, MickinMD said:

When the temperature in Central Maryland gets to the 20's and below, some people will say, "It's too cold to snow," and they're usually right - snowfall, if any, tends to be light and dry.

Tomorrow's early morning forecast seems to back that up!

image.thumb.png.dd52466aa65de001fdd348fb64cc26e0.png

Snow is snow Mick whether it be powder or heavy. We usually always get powder when extremely cold. I usually do not consider grapple as snow.

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4 hours ago, Wilbur said:

The atmosphere contains a lot less water vapour in cold temperatures.  Somewhere around .02% water vapour at sea level at -40 degrees.  So, no water vapour, no snow. 

Great explanation!

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