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chess question


Dirtyhip
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That's how you record a game.  You use a "from/to" addressing scheme.  The scheme you have on the board is used less often than the more normal that might look like KP to K4 for an opening move of Kings Pawn  moves to Kings row 4.

 

I think.

Of course I would defer to Doctor Mick.

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5 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

If you get serious about chess, then you should buy a chess board that has the coordinates.  Or just this as a map.     I never worried about coordinates.

image.png.90209f003f8faf8551b9156c81cdef50.png

I need to look at my board.  I have a cheap one.  I really need one for the dishwasher, but I digress.  :)

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33 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

Correct orientation of the chess board is needed to.   

See the info in the link.  

Agreed.  I used to put the queen and king backwards.  We were rookies when we started playing a few years ago.  So many games.  So so many.  

We were at a camp ground one time.  Someone came over to ask for some help and they said "That game looks intense, but could we bother you for a moment?"  :D  We were both staring at the board with great concentration.  HAHA  He and I are both competitive spirits.  

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Sorry for the delay - I overlooked the thread.

The squares have numbers and letters in order to score the game.  In official, rated tournaments, scoring the game is a requirement for both players - in case of a dispute or a realization that an illegal move had been made at some point.

The White side of the board is where it begins with the horizontal rows numbered 1 to 8 and the columns (black square on the left in row 1 ("Queen takes color") is where the letters begin a through h.

In international chess (I played International postal chess in the 70's), the moves are often recorded as the square you move from to the square you move to.  So if the pawn in front of White's king makes it's first move and goes two spaces, it's recorded as "e2e4."

In what's called "standard algebraic notation," that virtually the whole world uses now, the piece is named (in English: K, Q, B, N, R, P - N for Knight) except for the Pawn so that King's Pawn's move above would simply be "e4."  If a Bishop takes a Rook on a1, the notation would be Bxa1.

So, for example in the opening known as the Ruy Lopez (board below), named after the 1500's Spanish Bishop who made it famous, the first moves are 1. e4 e5 (White moves a Pawn to e4, Black moves a Pawn to e5), 2. Nf3 Nc6 (White moves his Kingside Knight out to f3, Black moves his Queenside Knight to c6), 3. Bb5 (White moves a Bishop to b5).  In International Chess it would be 1 e2e4, e7e5, 2 g1f3, b8c6, 3 f1b5

There's an old system, called "descriptive notation," once used in English speaking countries that no one uses since the 70's, but it's used in old chess books so people still learn it, where the columns are named after the piece beginning on them (K, Q, KN (King's Knight), etc.) and each side counts the rows from its side.  So the Ruy Lopez begins in old books as 1. P-K4, P-K4 2 N-KB3, N-QB3 3 B-N5.

Dominate with the Ruy Lopez – How to Play the Spanish Opening – iChess.net

If you're curious about some things related to serious chess but don't have the time to get deep into it, there's a 100 year-old book that's still excellent and very short (123 pages) compared to most chess books on the fundamentals of playing by former World Chess Champion Jose Capablanca.  It's legally free today and available in algebraic notation here.  It's something that can be skimmed.

It doesn't teach you how to read notation, but that's pretty straightforward and there are YouTube, etc. tutorials if you need them.

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12 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

Sorry for the delay - I overlooked the thread.

The squares have numbers and letters in order to score the game.  In official, rated tournaments, scoring the game is a requirement for both players - in case of a dispute or a realization that an illegal move had been made at some point.

The White side of the board is where it begins with the horizontal rows numbered 1 to 8 and the columns (black square on the left in row 1 ("Queen takes color") is where the letters begin a through h.

In international chess (I played International postal chess in the 70's), the moves are often recorded as the square you move from to the square you move to.  So if the pawn in front of White's king makes it's first move and goes two spaces, it's recorded as "e2e4."

In what's called "standard algebraic notation," that virtually the whole world uses now, the piece is named (in English: K, Q, B, N, R, P - N for Knight) except for the Pawn so that King's Pawn's move above would simply be "e4."  If a Bishop takes a Rook on a1, the notation would be Bxa1.

So, for example in the opening known as the Ruy Lopez (board below), named after the 1500's Spanish Bishop who made it famous, the first moves are 1. e4 e5 (White moves a Pawn to e4, Black moves a Pawn to e5), 2. Nf3 Nc6 (White moves his Kingside Knight out to f3, Black moves his Queenside Knight to c6), 3. Bb5 (White moves a Bishop to b5).  In International Chess it would be 1 e2e4, e7e5, 2 g1f3, b8c6, 3 f1b5

There's an old system, called "descriptive notation," once used in English speaking countries that no one uses since the 70's, but it's used in old chess books so people still learn it, where the columns are named after the piece beginning on them (K, Q, KN (King's Knight), etc.) and each side counts the rows from its side.  So the Ruy Lopez begins in old books as 1. P-K4, P-K4 2 N-KB3, N-QB3 3 B-N5.

Dominate with the Ruy Lopez – How to Play the Spanish Opening – iChess.net

If you're curious about some things related to serious chess but don't have the time to get deep into it, there's a 100 year-old book that's still excellent and very short (123 pages) compared to most chess books on the fundamentals of playing by former World Chess Champion Jose Capablanca.  It's legally free today and available in algebraic notation here.  It's something that can be skimmed.

It doesn't teach you how to read notation, but that's pretty straightforward and there are YouTube, etc. tutorials if you need them.

Oh shoot, we have been setting it up wrong.  I mean the pieces are in correct position like shown, but the 1-8 has been wrong in orientation to black and white.  

Thanks.  

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1 hour ago, Dirtyhip said:

Oh shoot, we have been setting it up wrong.  I mean the pieces are in correct position like shown, but the 1-8 has been wrong in orientation to black and white.  

Thanks.  

Now you have to play all those games over, or they won't count

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