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What do you think of this idea?


Dirtyhip
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Y'know I have this plethora of a collection of plant pots.  Enough to do just about anything.  I have been wracking my brain trying to think of a way to involve kids in the planting process of installing native wildflowers into the parks and places around town.  I was thinking of buying potting soil and seeds for wildflowers and having a two part planting series for kids.  

Part one would be having them seed their own pots to take home.  I would keep a large portion of them to care for to use in part two of the planting series.  In part two, the kids could see the plants that I have cared for and help put them in the ground at the second planting event.  The pot thing could be a smaller part of both events.  But allow them to see exactly how things grow and to water them and understand the process.  The larger scale portion would be direct sowing with rakes into the ground soil.

What do you see as my hurdles or problems with this idea?

While I do love the seed ball idea, I think the Acacia seed charcoal balls in Kenya is a very unique project.  I am not certain of adaptability and viability of making the balls correctly.  

A trail organization can pay for all the seeds and soil for this project.  No tax funds will be used.

?

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Assuming you have permission to plant in the parks, I think it's a nifty idea.  But i probably wouldn't refer to it as "the pot thing" since kids are involved. :nodhead:

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26 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

What do you see as my hurdles or problems with this idea?

Do wildflowers get potted?  I just see them spread the seed over an area and let them grow?  I think that's pretty cool either way - prepping an area and sowing the seeds or doing the pot, grow, transplant process.  

I'd wonder how well the plants will do with the transplanting process - how much care is required to get them growing in the ground after a transplant?

I'd also wonder if there are native plants that can serve as food - to humans and/or animals - and be planted.  IOW, traditional wildflower for beauty & pollinators, and some other ones for people or deer/squirrels/etc. to enjoy?

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If there’s an existing kids program in your area, get with the organizers to offer your planting sessions and get on their schedule. Library…book store…Boys and Girls club…Scouts… They will have structures in place, like a scheduled time and place, supervision, routines, follow-up, contact info in case something goes awry. 

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4 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Do wildflowers get potted?  I just see them spread the seed over an area and let them grow?  I think that's pretty cool either way - prepping an area and sowing the seeds or doing the pot, grow, transplant process.  

I'd wonder how well the plants will do with the transplanting process - how much care is required to get them growing in the ground after a transplant?

I'd also wonder if there are native plants that can serve as food - to humans and/or animals - and be planted.  IOW, traditional wildflower for beauty & pollinators, and some other ones for people or deer/squirrels/etc. to enjoy?

They can be potted and transplanted.  I guess my thought process is for them to have something to take home, and to see how a plant grows and how it is put in the ground.  I don't even care if the small amount of potted plants make it.  The larger seeding effort will be by direct sowing to ground contact.  

Park director is fully on board with seeding, so long as I use an approved type of seed, indigenous, low growth, etc.  

Just trying to create interest and start my army of people that care for nature.  

I won't get that many, IMO.  Getting people to even show up for trail work is challenging.  

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26 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

If there’s an existing kids program in your area, get with the organizers to offer your planting sessions and get on their schedule. Library…book store…Boys and Girls club…Scouts… They will have structures in place, like a scheduled time and place, supervision, routines, follow-up, contact info in case something goes awry. 

Ah scouts, I forget about them. Maybe a badge opportunity

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32 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

If there’s an existing kids program in your area, get with the organizers to offer your planting sessions and get on their schedule. Library…book store…Boys and Girls club…Scouts… They will have structures in place, like a scheduled time and place, supervision, routines, follow-up, contact info in case something goes awry. 

This is what I was thinking because insurance will be the biggest hurdle. 4-h would be another choice. 

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Just now, Zealot said:

Great idea, and good advice given here.  Nothing to add other than a cheering section! :cheerleader:

We are big on the indigenous plants here. I love the idea of getting kids into the scope. 

How hard is kudzu, vetch, or bamboo to get started? I bet it'll be easy for her to get this garden thing going.

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1 hour ago, Bikeguy said:

Plants is WoBG's thing to do.   The only thing I plant is grass seed, and I'm happy if that grows.

Our deck at our old home.  

DSC_4142.thumb.JPG.6d0ef96bf8b24c8c138da15604c2286f.JPG

That's amazing.  Mine could look like that but they would all be died in a week with our travel schedule.  

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37 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

Because...kids. 

Someone will invariably eat something, dare someone else to eat something.

We have a waiver that everyone must sign or a parent guardian must sign, there is also insurance that protects the organization if someone sinks an axe into their foot or into someone near to them. We also give safety talks before tools are used

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