Jump to content

Therefore I tell you, do not worry…


MoseySusan
 Share

Recommended Posts



1 hour ago, jsharrwick said:

Look at the lilies of the field…

I put in 20 pounds of seed today.  Our hill will have fields of crimson flowers. 

Do you know that for the bargain price of about a grand, you can buy 25 pounds of lupine seed?  :foryou: 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Susan here.  It is a waste of time to worry.  Spend the time enjoying your children, Grandchildren, Partners, Pets and nature.  All of this stuff is a waste to spend time fretting and blabbing about.  

I think it is pretty silly that some people think they are world war experts.  There is no use guessing what a crazy person is going to do.  

People should spend more time biking and enjoying the outdoors.  At least that is what I see from my kitchen window view.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dirtyhip said:

People should spend more time biking and enjoying the outdoors.  At least that is what I see from my kitchen window view.

...you really, really need to buy 500 or 1000 bulbs of Narcissus Golden Dawn, and dig out a big place you can see from the kitchen window, that gets full sun and isn't going to get in your way for other stuff, and plant them there.  Do it next fall.  Maybe throw in a few big rocks to keep people from driving over them by mistake. The variety has been around since the 1950's, so it's readily available in bulk quantities from the Dutch.  There was a guy down here who grew and sold them in bulk quantities, Bill Welch, but he died a few years back (early and unexpectedly).   As far as bulbs go, in quantity, they're not that expensive...  I put in about 500 of them in a border along the front yard fence here, and they're just starting to bloom now.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Page Turner said:

...you really, really need to buy 500 or 1000 bulbs of Narcissus Golden Dawn, and dig out a big place you can see from the kitchen window, that gets full sun and isn't going to get in your way for other stuff, and plant them there.  Do it next fall.  Maybe throw in a few big rocks to keep people from driving over them by mistake. The variety has been around since the 1950's, so it's readily available in bulk quantities from the Dutch.  There was a guy down here who grew and sold them in bulk quantities, Bill Welch, but he died a few years back (early and unexpectedly).   As far as bulbs go, in quantity, they're not that expensive...  I put in about 500 of them in a border along the front yard fence here, and they're just starting to bloom now.

Thank you.  

I have about $400 worth of stuff in my Brecks cart.  The Dutch love me.  I have been buying the bulk daffodil bags.  The Mt Hood daffodils are beautiful too.  I really look forward to seeing those come up.  There is stuff coming up everywhere and my addiction is far from over.  :)  I am thinking about buying a gigantic bag of purslane seeds too.  It is nutritious for animals and humans.  My soil here is fantastic.  Some clay, some sand and lots of organic matter.  Kind of heavy for carrots, but I am doing raised beds anyway.  

So sage is supposed to be allelopathic to other plants.  I have not noticed this being a problem for using their chipped matter around the garden.  Stuff is coming up just fine with the chipped sage.  Thoughts?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Ernest T. Bass said:

Matthew 6:25-34. My mind and my heart rely on this passage every day and have since I was a kid.

As one who suffers from anxiety and who is the father to a son with the same issue, it has a place in my heart as well.

I often go to Joel 2:25 and Galatian 6:2 also.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Dirtyhip said:

Thank you.  

I have about $400 worth of stuff in my Brecks cart.  The Dutch love me.  I have been buying the bulk daffodil bags.  The Mt Hood daffodils are beautiful too.  I really look forward to seeing those come up.  There is stuff coming up everywhere and my addiction is far from over.  :)  I am thinking about buying a gigantic bag of purslane seeds too.  It is nutritious for animals and humans.  My soil here is fantastic.  Some clay, some sand and lots of organic matter.  Kind of heavy for carrots, but I am doing raised beds anyway.  

So sage is supposed to be allelopathic to other plants.  I have not noticed this being a problem for using their chipped matter around the garden.  Stuff is coming up just fine with the chipped sage.  Thoughts?

...generally speaking, my impression is that allelopathic plants do their business by producing some sort of magical substance that kills off the competition while the allelopathic plant is alive.  Mt Hood is a very pretty older white variety but in my area it does not establish and naturalize itself quite as rapidly and reliably as something like Golden Dawn, or one of the other Tazetta daffodils do.  You are in a theoretically cooler and wetter part of the West Coast, so it probably does better where you live.  It grows here, and I have discovered it in abandoned gardens, but not in the same large numbers and drifts that some of the other daffodils in the same old plantings have achieved.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, jsharrwick said:

As one who suffers from anxiety and who is the father to a son with the same issue, it has a place in my heart as well.

I often go to Joel 2:25 and Galatian 6:2 also.

I admit that I've recently failed on Galatians 6:2. I tried repeatedly to help a longtime, close friend until it became too stressful, both mentally and physically. I had to walk away, and I'm ashamed to admit that I am much more at peace these days. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Ernest T. Bass said:

I admit that I've recently failed on Galatians 6:2. I tried repeatedly to help a longtime, close friend until it became too stressful, both mentally and physically. I had to walk away, and I'm ashamed to admit that I am much more at peace these days. 

Maybe contemplate a bit on Matthew 13.  You have your done your job of sowing.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...generally speaking, my impression is that allelopathic plants do their business by producing some sort of magical substance that kills off the competition while the allelopathic plant is alive.  Mt Hood is a very pretty older white variety but in my area it does not establish and naturalize itself quite as rapidly and reliably as something like Golden Dawn, or one of the other Tazetta daffodils do.  You are in a theoretically cooler and wetter part of the West Coast, so it probably does better where you live.  It grows here, and I have discovered it in abandoned gardens, but not in the same large numbers and drifts that some of the other daffodils in the same old plantings have achieved.

Is golden dawn similar to other "naturalizing daffodils?"  I buy these big mixed bags through Brecks.  They are inexpensive this way. 

I am definitely on board with your idea about planting 1000 of them.  Can you imagine the bees and the color?  

Additionally, I want to buy some Mason bees and a hive of bumble bees.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, jsharrwick said:

Maybe contemplate a bit on Matthew 13.  You have your done your job of sowing.  

True. On "Remember the Titans" when Bertier is talking to Coach Boone he says, "sometimes you just have to cut a man loose". 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

Is golden dawn similar to other "naturalizing daffodils?"  I buy these big mixed bags through Brecks.  They are inexpensive this way. 

I am definitely on board with your idea about planting 1000 of them.  Can you imagine the bees and the color?  

Additionally, I want to buy some Mason bees and a hive of bumble bees.  

...the "mixed for naturalizing" bags are not your wisest investment. They are basically bulbs they either lost track of the name in the harvesting and sorting process, or stuff they simply had an abundance of in a particular year. My personal preference is for daffodils planted out in drifts, with enough of one variety in each drift that they give the appearance of having been in the ground a long time, and have multiplied to fill a space.

Bill Welch had a deal going on down at Filoli Gardens near Woodside, where he was providing them with several thousands of Golden Dawn annually, with the plan that they would plant them out in one of the larger fields next to the house and formal garden.  It will probably take 15-20 years before they multiply enough to look really impressive. But they do naturalize very well almost everywhere, with good multiplication and resistance to every garden pest you can come up with.  And they have a wonderful sweet scent as cut flowers as well. They are relatively late bloomers for daffodils in the Tazetta family, so less problems with late snow up in the foothills at 2500 feet.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...the "mixed for naturalizing" bags are not your wisest investment. They are basically bulbs they either lost track of the name in the harvesting and sorting process, or stuff they simply had an abundance of in a particular year. My personal preference is for daffodils planted out in drifts, with enough of one variety in each drift that they give the appearance of having been in the ground a long time, and have multiplied to fill a space.

Bill Welch had a deal going on down at Filoli Gardens near Woodside, where he was providing them with several thousands of Golden Dawn annually, with the plan that they would plant them out in one of the larger fields next to the house and formal garden.  It will probably take 15-20 years before they multiply enough to look really impressive. But they do naturalize very well almost everywhere, with good multiplication and resistance to every garden pest you can come up with.  And they have a wonderful sweet scent as cut flowers as well. They are relatively late bloomers for daffodils in the Tazetta family, so less problems with late snow up in the foothills at 2500 feet.

Thank you.  Yeah, those bags are probably the ones they swept up off the floor.  :D  I guess my planting method would look "forced."  So many different varieties. 

I can not seem to find gigantic bags of golden dawn.  I need gigantic amounts.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...the "mixed for naturalizing" bags are not your wisest investment. They are basically bulbs they either lost track of the name in the harvesting and sorting process, or stuff they simply had an abundance of in a particular year. My personal preference is for daffodils planted out in drifts, with enough of one variety in each drift that they give the appearance of having been in the ground a long time, and have multiplied to fill a space.

Bill Welch had a deal going on down at Filoli Gardens near Woodside, where he was providing them with several thousands of Golden Dawn annually, with the plan that they would plant them out in one of the larger fields next to the house and formal garden.  It will probably take 15-20 years before they multiply enough to look really impressive. But they do naturalize very well almost everywhere, with good multiplication and resistance to every garden pest you can come up with.  And they have a wonderful sweet scent as cut flowers as well. They are relatively late bloomers for daffodils in the Tazetta family, so less problems with late snow up in the foothills at 2500 feet.

Where has everyone been getting the Red Dawn that is springing up all over the country?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

Thank you.  Yeah, those bags are probably the ones they swept up off the floor.  :D  I guess my planting method would look "forced."  So many different varieties. 

I can not seem to find gigantic bags of golden dawn.  I need gigantic amounts.  

...Bill Welch was the go to guy for many years here. I don't klnow what happened with his business when he died.  He had fields planted out with them, and ran a cut flower business at the Bay Area farmers markets, selling the excess bulbs as a sideline.  I'll check on the Daffnet (not making this up...one of the early user groups, and still active. daffodil people are by and large not tech nerds), and see if anyone knows. It will take a while, because it's show season here right now, so they're all intently focused on the various shows and getting their entries in order.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...Bill Welch was the go to guy for many years here. I don't klnow what happened with his business when he died.  He had fields planted out with them, and ran a cut flower business at the Bay Area farmers markets, selling the excess bulbs as a sideline.  I'll check on the Daffnet (not making this up...one of the early user groups, and still active. daffodil people are by and large not tech nerds), and see if anyone knows. It will take a while, because it's show season here right now, so they're all intently focused on the various shows and getting their entries in order.

You seem to be quite the gardener.  I love that.

All the trees that we planted are doing very well.  The two hazelnuts we put in appear to be creating large tendrils of nut sacks.  Sorry if this sounds crude.  I don't know how else to describe it.  I think these are the male tendrils and the female parts create the nut meat.  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...OK, I found this at the Pacific Bulb Society mailing list, which is worth joining if you are planning on doing a lot of bulbs.  There's a vast collection of opinions and experience connected together on that list.

 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On 2020-03-01 23:33, michaelcmace@gmail.com wrote:

I went to the memorial get-together at Bill the Bulb Baron's farm today. I
was very happy to hear that the business will continue -- Bill left the farm
to the couple who had been working with him.
As I'm sure most of you know, there are far too many stories of bulb
businesses that either disappeared completely or were subject to desperate
last-minute rescue operations after the owner died. Bill planned ahead to
prevent that from happening, and I really respect it.
I hadn't realized how prominent Bill was in the breeding of Tazetta
narcissus. The American Daffodil Society gave him its gold medal last year.
The majority of plants at Bill's farm are Narcissus (past peak bloom,
unfortunately), but tucked away in various spots were all sorts of goodies:
Freesias scattered around in ones and twos, a few vivid yellow
Zantedeschias, a row of Watsonias in bud, a little bright purple patch of
Scilla peruviana (or whatever the heck we call them these days), and so on.
Plus I think about an acre of Amaryllis, with a few plants that looked like
Crinums at the edges. The plants all looked very vigorous and well cared for.
I'm told that Bill died peacefully at the bulb farm, taking a nap in his
truck. Not a bad way to go.
Mike
___________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...