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Tire patches


12string
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7 minutes ago, 12string said:

2 tubes had holes along seams

Those aren't seams.  That's just flashing form the molding process.  

And I use patches from the $2.00 patch kit purchased at the checkout counter of my LBS.  I get a new one every year for myself and my 2 daughters.  I have had the experience of having the glue dry up at the wrong time... 

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My success rate on patching tubes isn't great - often too close to seams flashing from the molding process, or to the valve.  I carry the adhesive type patches on the bike - but I also carry a spare tube.  Once I'm home and I have time, I like the old school rubber cement patches.

A recent patching effort failed because I lost track of where the actual pinhole was (couldn't see it) and placed the patch just off the mark.  argh

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3 minutes ago, TrentonMakes said:

I lost track of where the actual pinhole was (couldn't see it) and placed the patch just off the mark.  argh

A small piece of chalk helps with that.

 

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20 minutes ago, 12string said:

What do you people use to patch tubes?

Finally got to fixing last weeks tribulations.  2 tubes had holes along seams.  My patches wouldn't hold air in.  Or my my patching was the culprit.  I hate throwing out tubes.

Regular rubber taar patches & glue. I don't like throwing them oot either. I enjoy patching them :)

When I repair tubes its back at home. So after I apply the patch & glue, I place a quarter on each side of the tube, and clamp it, and let it set over night. So far I've never had a patch fail. Not sure if I had a hole on the seam though.:scratchhead:

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If you are going to patch the tubes I highly recommend Rema Tip Top patch kits.  I have used them for decades with great results.  Admittedly I don’t F’ with patching tubes much anymore…

https://cambriabike.com/products/rema-tip-top-tt02-touring-patch-kit?variant=27715625386058&utm_source=googleshopping&utm_medium=cse&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=&scid=scplp001676000200&sc_intid=001676000200&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsImgp_6i9gIVXz2tBh2KEQgDEAQYASABEgLGKfD_BwE

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12 minutes ago, TrentonMakes said:

My success rate on patching tubes isn't great - often too close to seams flashing from the molding process, or to the valve.  I carry the adhesive type patches on the bike - but I also carry a spare tube.  Once I'm home and I have time, I like the old school rubber cement patches.

A recent patching effort failed because I lost track of where the actual pinhole was (couldn't see it) and placed the patch just off the mark.  argh

When I inflate the tube and see/feel the leak, I use a sharpie and circle the hole.

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38 minutes ago, 12string said:

What do you people use to patch tubes?

Finally got to fixing last weeks tribulations.  2 tubes had holes along seams.  My patches wouldn't hold air in.  Or my my patching was the culprit.  I hate throwing out tubes.

I use them to stake up beans and tomatoes.  :) 

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20 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

When I inflate the tube and see/feel the leak, I use a sharpie and circle the hole.

I don't remember now where I discovered this tip but when patching a tube on the road, if you can’t tell where the hole is, run the tube by your ear & cheek and you can either feel it on your face or hear it.  A dab of spit on your finger on the tube to confirm.

Once I find the leak I wrap the tube over two fingers on my left hand putting the hole over the crack of my two fingers.  I have missed the hole when glueing and this helps.
 

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New tube here. It’s faster than patching on site of the flat. I also get the tubes at a discount from work. I carry the Park Tools patch kit but I learned that once the tube of glue is opened it will be solid the next time around. I buy a new kit after use and throw out the old tube. The pre-glued patches never hold for me. I may patch old tubes in bulk and use @bikeman564™’s $.50 method. 

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10 minutes ago, Old No. 7 said:

New tube here. It’s faster than patching on site of the flat. I also get the tubes at a discount from work. I carry the Park Tools patch kit but I learned that once the tube of glue is opened it will be solid the next time around. I buy a new kit after use and throw out the old tube. The pre-glued patches never hold for me. I may patch old tubes in bulk and use @bikeman564™’s $.50 method. 

👍 My LBS ordered me a large can of glue :) I'll post a pic later. It doesn't dry oot

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What is everyone running over to get all these flats? In all my years of riding I’ve only had two flats. They were both on my mountain bike. The first one was a sharp stick impaled my tire. I replaced the tire. The other one was on the GAP. Someone had dug a ditch across the trail, must have buried a pipe or something. They filled the ditch with crushed stone but large crushed stone. A sharp stone cut my tire and tube about a one inch gash. I booted the tire and patched the tube and finished my ride. My road bike and my touring bikes have never had a flat. I always ran Bontrager hard case slicks. That might be the reason I don’t get flats. On my new bike I’m running Kenda tires. If I start getting flats I’ll run them tubeless. They came with the valve stems and sealant to run tubeless but they shipped the bike with tubes in the tires. I’m not going tubeless unless I have trouble.

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36 minutes ago, Old No. 7 said:

New tube here. It’s faster than patching on site of the flat. I also get the tubes at a discount from work. I carry the Park Tools patch kit but I learned that once the tube of glue is opened it will be solid the next time around. I buy a new kit after use and throw out the old tube. The pre-glued patches never hold for me. I may patch old tubes in bulk and use @bikeman564™’s $.50 method. 

True that on the glue tube drying out.

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Just now, Longjohn said:

In all my years of riding I’ve only had two flats.

That is PHENOMENAL.  It can be said better riders can get fewer flats because they ride more smoothly and are more aware of things that might cause flats, but just two is pretty spectacular.

If I get two a YEAR I am fine with it.  I got two in half a year in CA, and both were tiny little bits of metal road debris (one was a staple).  No way my eye would have spotted those to avoid. The rest of 2021 was flat free, so I hit my "two limit".

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Around here, by this time of year, there's a LOT of junk on the road.  And it's hard to see at night.  Sweepers come out in the spring.  I do carry a tube and pre-glued patches for quick roadside repairs, But I'll patch them when I get home.  In the winter, wind, dark, traffic - you can't always feel the air on your cheek or hear it.  another reason to just switch the tube.  I like the quarter and clamp idea!

And old tubes are also good for pulling the trunks of River Birches together to direct their growth.  Or strapping wood for glue ups.

Both tubes this time were cut the same, I still can not find anything on the wheel or tire.  Hopefully t fell out with the second flat.

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I was riding across the causeway at the local lake and it has a wide two way bike lane on one side and and equally wide parking lane on the other side. It was November weekday so nobody was parked in the parking lane. I always ride on the road because both those extra lanes accumulate road trash. Many times I ride across the causeway and never see any vehicles. I notice a truck coming up behind me and a car coming toward me so I get over in the parking lane and as I do I notice it is completely covered with little shards of brown and green glass. I rode through it and held my breath. I stopped later to get a drink and make sure nothing was sticking in my tires. They were ok.

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54 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

That is PHENOMENAL.  It can be said better riders can get fewer flats because they ride more smoothly and are more aware of things that might cause flats, but just two is pretty spectacular.

If I get two a YEAR I am fine with it.  I got two in half a year in CA, and both were tiny little bits of metal road debris (one was a staple).  No way my eye would have spotted those to avoid. The rest of 2021 was flat free, so I hit my "two limit".

Yeah I used to get a few a year before going tubeless and generally have to repair my wife’s flats.  When I was still riding my Bianchi I run the exact same tubes & tires as my wife and she tends to flat 3-4X more often than I do.  I’m not sure if it’s just bad luck, not recognizing the road hazards or both. 

 

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1 hour ago, Longjohn said:

What is everyone running over to get all these flats? In all my years of riding I’ve only had two flats. 

As others have said - that's a great record.  I'm lucky if I only have two flats per year.  And I've been running Gatorskins (though I have something else on the back now).  In mid-Jan I got a flat on the front which is still a GS.  There was some road salt on the shoulder.... could have been that.

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2 hours ago, bikeman564™ said:

I place a quarter on each side of the tube, and clamp it, and let it set over night.

That's a good idea.  :)    I never thought of that.     That's a new use for my huge C clamp that I use to squeeze the piston(s) back into the caliper on my cars disk brakes.  

Over the years I've patched my tubes and just a few didn't work.  I'd bet, this would work just about all the time. 

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16 minutes ago, sheep_herder said:

X with a ball point pen also works.

Chalk, Sharpie, ballpoint... all good ideas.  I thought of chalk, but I didn't want to use anything that could compromise the adhesion of the patch.

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6 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

That's a good idea.  :)    I never thought of that.     That's a new use for my huge C clamp that I use to squeeze the piston(s) back into the caliper on my cars disk brakes.  

Over the years I've patched my tubes and just a few didn't work.  I'd bet, this would work just about all the time. 

Thanks. I don't use a lot of pressure, I have a plastic clip to hold the quarters on. It's worked for me.

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2 hours ago, Longjohn said:

What is everyone running over to get all these flats? In all my years of riding I’ve only had two flats. They were both on my mountain bike. The first one was a sharp stick impaled my tire. I replaced the tire. The other one was on the GAP. Someone had dug a ditch across the trail, must have buried a pipe or something. They filled the ditch with crushed stone but large crushed stone. A sharp stone cut my tire and tube about a one inch gash. I booted the tire and patched the tube and finished my ride. My road bike and my touring bikes have never had a flat. I always ran Bontrager hard case slicks. That might be the reason I don’t get flats. On my new bike I’m running Kenda tires. If I start getting flats I’ll run them tubeless. They came with the valve stems and sealant to run tubeless but they shipped the bike with tubes in the tires. I’m not going tubeless unless I have trouble.

In Arizona the thorns are plentiful, as are wires from blown out radial tires.  I carry 2 spare tubes with me on local rides, 1 patched and 1 new.  On the double century rides, I carry 4 tubes ( I hate to dnf for a flat when the entry fee is over $100, and I traveled 6-8 hours one way to the ride).

I ordered a pack of 100 patches from Amazon, and use Slime rubber cement.  I have wondered if that cement was as good as the tubes in the small patch kits I used to be able to get at the LBS.  But  I have at least a 50% success rate in patching tubes.  After I apply the patch, I air it up the next day.  If it holds air for 2 days, it is good.  I figure each successful patch saves me $8, the cost of a new tube at REI.

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18 minutes ago, az_cyclist said:

In Arizona the thorns are plentiful, as are wires from blown out radial tires.  I carry 2 spare tubes with me on local rides, 1 patched and 1 new.  On the double century rides, I carry 4 tubes ( I hate to dnf for a flat when the entry fee is over $100, and I traveled 6-8 hours one way to the ride).

I ordered a pack of 100 patches from Amazon, and use Slime rubber cement.  I have wondered if that cement was as good as the tubes in the small patch kits I used to be able to get at the LBS.  But  I have at least a 50% success rate in patching tubes.  After I apply the patch, I air it up the next day.  If it holds air for 2 days, it is good.  I figure each successful patch saves me $8, the cost of a new tube at REI.

From what I hear everything in Arizona has pricks.

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5 hours ago, TrentonMakes said:

Chalk, Sharpie, ballpoint... all good ideas.  I thought of chalk, but I didn't want to use anything that could compromise the adhesion of the patch.

 

I carry one of these in the saddle bag.

image.png.23e838afcd44f51a935edc61b3c00f81.png

If the tube puncture is hard to find and harder to see, I use the scissors to make the hole bigger.  Turning a pinhole into a small cut makes it easier to see, easier to clean up where the patch has to go, easier to center the glue around the hole, and easier to place the patch centered on the damage.  The patch seals a small cut just as well as it seals a pinhole, so putting a small cut in the tube has no effect on the end result.

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