Jump to content

Cooking question.


donkpow
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am making lemonade. You know why.  I need help with the math because I am old and my mind is weak.

So here's the problem. I have a 32 ounce jug that I want to fill with lemonade. The recipe calls to make a syrup of water and sugar in a ratio of 2:1. When the syrup is ready, mix it with lemon juice in a 2:1 ratio. That's the "base" for the lemonade drink. Now, you mix the "base" with water in a 1:1 ratio and viola, you have lemonade.

So here's my question, Do what?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, donkpow said:

I am making lemonade. You know why.  I need help with the math because I am old and my mind is weak.

So here's the problem. I have a 32 ounce jug that I want to fill with lemonade. The recipe calls to make a syrup of water and sugar in a ratio of 2:1. When the syrup is ready, mix it with lemon juice in a 2:1 ratio. That's the "base" for the lemonade drink. Now, you mix the "base" with water in a 1:1 ratio and viola, you have lemonade.

So here's my question, Do what?

yes

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

is syrup 2 part water to 1 part sugar or reverse?, Same with syrup & juice.

But something like this

image.png.a6e22464634a1dab498b87683c5b03f6.png

Yes, water : sugar ratio is correct. Lemon juice : syrup is backwards. This poses the question, does the mixing of water and sugar create a significantly larger volume of syrup than of water?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, donkpow said:

Yes, water : sugar ratio is correct. Lemon juice : syrup is backwards. This poses the question, does the mixing of water and sugar create a significantly larger volume of syrup than of water?

revised :) I'd need to think aboot the volume question, ask @MickinMD. The sugar will dissolve, but not sure how much by volume. My calculation below is the simple version. Make the syrup first, then you'll see what you end up with. Try doubling the starting volumes.

image.png.bd9fe06592d950fef5797ef38cb25e3d.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's what I thought, 16 oz of water and 16 oz of base. That makes the base 16/3=5.33. Of which 10.6 oz of syrup and 5.3 oz of lemon juice. Neglecting volumetric change in the mixture (sugar is "dissolved"), that's 10.6 oz of water and 5.3 fl oz of sugar.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That really is confusing.  All that math!  All you wanted to do was make some nice lemonade and the recipe people just had to stick it to you.  Sometimes life just gives you lemons.  Hey - you know what you should do?!

  • Awesome 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, donkpow said:

I'm using the 32 oz bottle because that's what the lemon juice came in. It's hippy stuff, I doubt you would understand.

I don't understand "stupid" so I am thinking you are correct. :)  Carry on...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

With 2 oz of adjustment

Yeah, I can fudge it. I actually use a little less sugar in the recipe but I don't think that matters since it is the total volume of the syrup that counts in filling the jug. I could make up the 2 oz with water and be perfectly happy with the mix.

Here's what I use. Around $5 at Krogers.

0003619212267

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

I don't understand "stupid" so I am thinking you are correct. :)  Carry on...

I see, Mr. Language Skills is falling out, huh? If you want a little tête-à-tête and some mano a mano, you'll just have to wait. I'm making some lemonade to put in a 32 oz bottle right now.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, donkpow said:

I see, Mr. Language Skills is falling out, huh? If you want a little tête-à-tête and some mano a mano, you'll just have to wait. I'm making some lemonade to put in a 32 oz bottle right now.

Settle down gramps.  

95n-UJ.gif

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This all assumes that the water and lemon juice are fluid ounces and the sugar is in weighed ounces.

Scratch work:

Temporarily forgetting about the 32 oz. jug - we'll adjust to it later: for 2 syrup to 1 part lemon juicer,  then it's a ratio 4 oz water and 2 oz sugar to 3 oz of lemon juice: that's twice as much syrup as lemon juice.

Then that 9 oz. of base is mixed with an equal amount, 9 oz., of water.  That would make 18/32 of a full 32 oz jug.  So you have to multiply it by 32/18 to make 32 oz.

4 x 32/18 = 7.11 oz water plus 2 x 32/18 = 3.56 oz of sugar for syrup.  (10.67 oz total)

 3 x 32/18 = 5.33 oz lemon juice is added to it (16.00 oz total) to make the base.

Then an equal amount, 16.00 oz of water: 32.00 oz total.

Final work: rounded to easy to handle volumes and weights:

Make a syrup with 7 oz of water and 3.5 oz. of sugar.

NOTE: if the recipe means 2 fluid ounces of syrup to 1 fluid ounce of lemon juice, you need 10.5 fluid ounces of syrup and may have to use a little more than 7 oz of water and 3.5 oz of weighed sugar because the sugar dissolving in the water may cut the volume down below 10.5 fluid ounces.  If it's close, to 10.5 fluid ounces, I wouldn't worry about it.

Make the base by adding 5.25 oz. of lemon juice to the syrup.

Add 15.75 oz. of water to the base.

That works out to 31.5 oz. though the sugar dissolving in the water probably will reduce the volume to a little less than 31.5 fluid oz.

If you want 32 oz. exactly, the easiest way is to cheat and top it off with a little more water - it's not likely enough to make a noticeable difference in taste.

 

  • Like 2
  • Awesome 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, donkpow said:

Yeah, I can fudge it. I actually use a little less sugar in the recipe but I don't think that matters since it is the total volume of the syrup that counts in filling the jug. I could make up the 2 oz with water and be perfectly happy with the mix.

Here's what I use. Around $5 at Krogers.

0003619212267

BuffCarla always has a bottle of this in the fridge. She makes salad dressings,  adds it to butter on asparagus and uses on fish if no fresh lemons are available. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, BuffJim said:

I only order them when I am in the tropics, Florida or south. This was Ybor City, Tampa. 

I've only bought a couple of them. But a few years ago I was at a friends house and they were making them fresh w/ homegrown mint. So good.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, MickinMD said:

This all assumes that the water and lemon juice are fluid ounces and the sugar is in weighed ounces.

Scratch work:

Temporarily forgetting about the 32 oz. jug - we'll adjust to it later: for 2 syrup to 1 part lemon juicer,  then it's a ratio 4 oz water and 2 oz sugar to 3 oz of lemon juice: that's twice as much syrup as lemon juice.

Then that 9 oz. of base is mixed with an equal amount, 9 oz., of water.  That would make 18/32 of a full 32 oz jug.  So you have to multiply it by 32/18 to make 32 oz.

4 x 32/18 = 7.11 oz water plus 2 x 32/18 = 3.56 oz of sugar for syrup.  (10.67 oz total)

 3 x 32/18 = 5.33 oz lemon juice is added to it (16.00 oz total) to make the base.

Then an equal amount, 16.00 oz of water: 32.00 oz total.

Final work: rounded to easy to handle volumes and weights:

Make a syrup with 7 oz of water and 3.5 oz. of sugar.

NOTE: if the recipe means 2 fluid ounces of syrup to 1 fluid ounce of lemon juice, you need 10.5 fluid ounces of syrup and may have to use a little more than 7 oz of water and 3.5 oz of weighed sugar because the sugar dissolving in the water may cut the volume down below 10.5 fluid ounces.  If it's close, to 10.5 fluid ounces, I wouldn't worry about it.

Make the base by adding 5.25 oz. of lemon juice to the syrup.

Add 15.75 oz. of water to the base.

That works out to 31.5 oz. though the sugar dissolving in the water probably will reduce the volume to a little less than 31.5 fluid oz.

If you want 32 oz. exactly, the easiest way is to cheat and top it off with a little more water - it's not likely enough to make a noticeable difference in taste.

 

Correction.  I figured out the answer to my NOTE in my last post above.

I looked up some chemistry info and found the table below and a 33% sugar syrup has a density of about 1.15 g/mL.

That's 15% denser than water (1 g/mL), so the amount of water and sugar must be increased by 15% above what I listed to get a 33% sugar syrup that occupies 10.5 fl. oz.

So 7 oz x 1.15 = 8.05 oz.  8 oz. is close enough.

So, use 8 fl. oz. of water and 4 weighed oz. of sugar to get 10.5 fl. oz. of syrup, replacing the  7 oz. and 3.5 oz. in my "Final work" above.

image.png.b57ccbe9a020ad658a89e3c28d092b2f.png

  • Like 2
  • Awesome 1
  • Hugs 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MickinMD said:

Correction.  I figured out the answer to my NOTE in my last post above.

I looked up some chemistry info and found the table below and a 33% sugar syrup has a density of about 1.15 g/mL.

That's 15% denser than water (1 g/mL), so the amount of water and sugar must be increased by 15% above what I listed to get a 33% sugar syrup that occupies 10.5 fl. oz.

So 7 oz x 1.15 = 8.05 oz.  8 oz. is close enough.

So, use 8 fl. oz. of water and 4 weighed oz. of sugar to get 10.5 fl. oz. of syrup, replacing the  7 oz. and 3.5 oz. in my "Final work" above.

image.png.b57ccbe9a020ad658a89e3c28d092b2f.png

You are a very smart guy. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MickinMD said:

Correction.  I figured out the answer to my NOTE in my last post above.

I looked up some chemistry info and found the table below and a 33% sugar syrup has a density of about 1.15 g/mL.

That's 15% denser than water (1 g/mL), so the amount of water and sugar must be increased by 15% above what I listed to get a 33% sugar syrup that occupies 10.5 fl. oz.

So 7 oz x 1.15 = 8.05 oz.  8 oz. is close enough.

So, use 8 fl. oz. of water and 4 weighed oz. of sugar to get 10.5 fl. oz. of syrup, replacing the  7 oz. and 3.5 oz. in my "Final work" above.

image.png.b57ccbe9a020ad658a89e3c28d092b2f.png

Thanks a lot. Interesting. My initial curiosity was whether or not there was a change in volume by dissolving the sugar in the water. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, BuffJim said:

Not sure you have the right image of my BuffCarla in your head…

The lady I put up is the lady that puts the hot sauce in everything in the commercials. No reflection on you or yours.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Math made simple...

Makes more than 32 oz, but mix the excess with vodka, rum, brandy, or alcohol of your choice to make margarita, sangria or whatever, and you won't worry about the math. In fact, the greater the alcohol ratio the better and were you really going to measure the alcohol anyway? 

 

Lemonaide.jpg

  • Haha 2
  • Hugs 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...