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I like this house.


Dirtyhip
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I'm curious why they refinished the floors and put a new roof on it. Looks like a teardown. How low is the bar that it has a certificate of occupancy? 

Don't miss this opportunity. This property was designated a clandestine Drug lab and has now been cleaned up and a certificate of occupancy has been issued and is on file. Asbestos siding has been removed.

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1 hour ago, dinneR said:

I'm curious why they refinished the floors and put a new roof on it. Looks like a teardown

I'd guess the home was purchased to be flipped.  And now they decided to take a 40% return on the money they invested.

Not sure...  The roof and floor could have been replaced before the sale in November.   If not, they still probably will make money on the sale, just not as much.

 

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If in decent shape, it would be a nice, small home.

But it was listed last year for $75K, sold in November for $71K and the new owner wants $99.9K now, four months later, with nothing done?

I wonder how much replacement of the walls, studs, etc. are required due to long-term water damage: the inside pictures of the exterior walls will cracks, buckling, dark spots, etc. are not promising.

I assume it sold after passing termite, etc. tests., or else there's another $8K or more in repairs.

 

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1 hour ago, Dirtyhip said:

Prices here are ridic. 

They really are!  I leafed through a few houses, and they all seem overpriced and shabby AF.  Chain link is everywhere, and does nobody update their appliances/kitchen ever?  It seems like everyone thinks their place is a castle in KF.

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2 hours ago, Dirtyhip said:

I am not buying this.  It was a parody n Bikeman's thread with the lovely old home.

Yeah I got that.   

I was just amazed about the price for a home that was gutted and is now being sold for 40% more than the sale price from 4 months ago.

I'm just glad I don't need to buy a home now. 

I was talking to my brother and his daughter is getting married and they are looking for a home.  Next week my brother is going to help her move.  They have no idea where she will move, the lease is up on her apartment soon.  She has lived in Colorado for several years now.   Just 2 days ago, they almost purchsed a home...  they had an offer pending, got up the next day, the home was sold for $50K over list price. They were told people from California out bid them.  Now they are looking again.  

 

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1 hour ago, petitepedal said:

If I buy it..will you and Kevin refurb it...Take your time..I don't retire for 4 years...gotta get out of my condo before the renters take over...and 98,000 would probably  be my max budget :(

We are done with that nonsense.

I just saw a 2/1 sold for 190K, on a city lot.  WTF?!  It's in the burbs, not necesaarily a nice neighborhood.  I really like where we live now. Small sub, off the beaten path and tons of space.  

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...another bulb bloomed out here that you might want to try at your new house.  It's Allium triquetrum. One of the smaller onions, and it is prolific to the point of being somewhat invasive in some places. I have it over contained in a dry corner on the street, under a dogwood tree.  It looks a lot like the snowbells and snowflakes, that are more difficult to establish here, because of the long hot summers.  The green leaves also makes a pretty good salad onion.  Not sure about the deer eating them. But they proliferate so quickly that if you get a patch going, they might outgrow any predation.  Or you can plant them in a sunny location closer to the house, where the deer are less inclined to browse.

It's a rock solid bulb, and pretty when in bloom. Should be cheap and available to buy.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Page Turner said:

...another bulb bloomed out here that you might want to try at your new house.  It's Allium triquetrum. One of the smaller onions, and it is prolific to the point of being somewhat invasive in some places. I have it over contained in a dry corner on the street, under a dogwood tree.  It looks a lot like the snowbells and snowflakes, that are more difficult to establish here, because of the long hot summers.  The green leaves also makes a pretty good salad onion.  Not sure about the deer eating them. But they proliferate so quickly that if you get a patch going, they might outgrow any predation.  Or you can plant them in a sunny location closer to the house, where the deer are less inclined to browse.

It's a rock solid bulb, and pretty when in bloom. Should be cheap and available to buy.

 

 

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I think we might be too cold for that.  

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38 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...with that much chill, you ought to be in good shape for apples. You will be able to grow varieties I've only dreamed about. :)

I will let you know how those trees do. Bare root, so it will be a while

 

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3 minutes ago, Dirtyhip said:

I will let you know how those trees do. Bare root, so it will be a while

 

...first three years you just want to keep them watered well, and growing vigorously. I don't prune at all for three years, and I pick off any fruit they set, so it doesn't drain the plant's energy. Once they get some size on them, gradually prune to shape. Early on in the life cycle, you want to carry as much leaf as you can.  Apples are not especially fussy about extra feeding, and you can even manure the root area on the surface a little after the first year. Just don't let the composted manure get close to the trunk and the root crown. Keep all feed and compost out near the drip line.

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2 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...first three years you just want to keep them watered well, and growing vigorously. I don't prune at all for three years, and I pick off any fruit they set, so it doesn't drain the plant's energy. Once they get some size on them, gradually prune to shape. Early on in the life cycle, you want to carry as much leaf as you can.  Apples are not especially fussy about extra feeding, and you can even manure the root area on the surface a little after the first year. Just don't let the composted manure get close to the trunk and the root crown. Keep all feed and compost out near the drip line.

Great. Hope they do.well. they were cheaper this way. 

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