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Will your fire extinguisher really help?


maddmaxx
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An apartment fire on the 20th floor of a New York City high rise was started by a lithium Ion battery in a "micro mobility device".  Fire officials say that the resident was "repairing" several devices which are defined as E-bikes, E-scooters or even some E-wheel chairs.  IMO your fire extinguisher may not help you if a lithium ion battery catches fire.  The fire injured 38 people, 2 critically and 5 seriously.

More importantly, "Chief Fire Marshall Daniel Flynn says this is almost the 200th fire caused by a lithium ion battery from a micro mobility device just this year in the city."

At least 38 injured in blaze at NYC apartment high rise caused by lithium ion battery (nbcnews.com)

 

You had to know this was coming.

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2 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

An apartment fire on the 20th floor of a New York City high rise was started by a lithium Ion battery in a "micro mobility device".  Fire officials say that the resident was "repairing" several devices which are defined as E-bikes, E-scooters or even some E-wheel chairs.  IMO your fire extinguisher may not help you if a lithium ion battery catches fire.  The fire injured 38 people, 2 critically and 5 seriously.

More importantly, "Chief Fire Marshall Daniel Flynn says this is almost the 200th fire caused by a lithium ion battery from a micro mobility device just this year in the city."

At least 38 injured in blaze at NYC apartment high rise caused by lithium ion battery (nbcnews.com)

 

You had to know this was coming.

I have fire protective gloves at home and the airplane.  We also have a fire bag onboard for containment.  In the house, that will be a sink to run water over whatever catches fire. 

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5 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

An apartment fire on the 20th floor of a New York City high rise was started by a lithium Ion battery in a "micro mobility device".  Fire officials say that the resident was "repairing" several devices which are defined as E-bikes, E-scooters or even some E-wheel chairs.  IMO your fire extinguisher may not help you if a lithium ion battery catches fire.  The fire injured 38 people, 2 critically and 5 seriously.

More importantly, "Chief Fire Marshall Daniel Flynn says this is almost the 200th fire caused by a lithium ion battery from a micro mobility device just this year in the city."

At least 38 injured in blaze at NYC apartment high rise caused by lithium ion battery (nbcnews.com)

 

You had to know this was coming.

I don't have a fire extinguisher but I should get one in case of a fire on the kitchen stove - I won't be cooking Alkali Metals.

Next February, I'm going to get lights and a heating pad for my garden seed growing set-up that I'll turn off when I'm not home and, after my house fire experience, I'm definitely going to put a fire alarm right next to it and have a fire extinguisher on hand, even though there is no old, poorly assembled wiring in the house now.

Fortunately, the setup is on the enclosed porch beyond the original outside wall of the house.

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OK.  I ordered a fire extinguisher (pic below).  It arrives from Amazon this coming weekend.

I should have had one and, since I'm going to use a heating pad with my porch garden seeds next spring and put a fire alarm on the ceiling above them, I figured I might as well get one now.  It's also handy in case of a kitchen fire.  With all-new electric wiring, etc. in the house and no need to add more, I doubt if I'll have another electrical-caused house fire.

A lot of experts recommend one for each floor of the house but, since one in the central 1st floor hall would be handy in all cases, one is enough.

I did a little research and the extinguishers have ratings of A and usually B and C.

The "A" rating is for how many equivalent gallons of water it has to put out a wood, paper, and other ordinary combustable fire and put out a certain size of burning wood panel where A = 1.25 gallons so 2-A = 2.5 gallons and each "A" will, on avg., put out about 50 square feet of a wood fire.

B is for liquid fires and each "B" represents 2.5 sq. ft. of a liquid fire that can be put out, so 10-B would put out a 25 sq. ft liquid fire.

C means it works on electrical fires, too.

Some safety, fire department, etc. pages recommend a 2A 10B:C fire extinguisher for the home and that's what I got: 9.6 lb total weight, 5 lb fire retardant powder, 16" tall and 4.6" diameter.  These are "rechargeable" though some commenters say it's cheaper to just buy a new one.  It has a "12 year limited warranty."  Pull the pin, aim the hose, squeeze the handle:

image.thumb.png.7b03a10847732968371a993da98f2a5e.png

 

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Some people call me a safety zealot but I don't consider myself that for being prepared.  My simple kitchen rule is that any time a pot or pan is used on the stove top, I have the best and most appropriate fire extinguisher ready on the counter:

s356-s363-lid.jpg

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