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Units of measure


Mr. Silly
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Go to solution Solved by JerrySTL,

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If it were burntiness then the numbers would be decimals like: .1 brunty, .2 burty ... 1.0 burnty.

 

That's not true.  Bunrtiness is implied with 10 being the highest possible level.  Kinda like your TV.  The know goes to 10 (or sometimes 11) and it's implied that 10 is the highest voluminificiation you can get.

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Mine goes to "11".

 

Must be imported from China or Kanada.  One uses the metric system of toaster units and the other one can't kount (or spell).

 

I'd return it to where it was purchased and if they give you any grief about having to return it to the manufacturer, throw it at them like Krazy would do.

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Must be imported from China or Kanada.  One uses the metric system of toaster units and the other one can't kount (or spell).

 

I'd return it to where it was purchased and if they give you any grief about having to return it to the manufacturer, throw it at them like Krazy would do.

I brought it back from the ISS when my tour ended.

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The word "toast" comes from the Latin word "tostum" which is to burn or to scorch.  The Romans loved them some toast.  I am pretty sure the unit of measure for toasting is the tostum.  The higher the tostum number, the more burned or scorched your bread becomes.

 

You are not only evil, you are an idiot.  You just made that up, thinking some fools here would believe you.  My mama' didn't raise no fools. 

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When the manufacturers of the first toasters were deciding how to 'calibrate' the dials vs. the numbers they had no standards to go by.  They decided that the people who would make toast generally look at the color of the bread/toast to determine if the bread is toasted the way they like it.  I.e. white = untoasted bread, black = burned, with all the shades of brown in between.

 

At the time Crayola Crayons were the defacto standard for colors that everybody used since they were kids, and this is what the manufacturers turned to.  So the number '1' on the toaster is the 'color' toast you get same as if you melted one white crayon with one burnt umber crayon. (Remember they were working on toasters so it was easy to melt the crayons.)  The number '2' means one white crayon melted with 2 burnt umber crayons, the number '3' means one white crayon with 3 burnt umber crayons, and so on.

 

If you don't believe me you can visit the Crayola Experience Museum in Easton PA and validate this for yourself.

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When the manufacturers of the first toasters were deciding how to 'calibrate' the dials vs. the numbers they had no standards to go by. They decided that the people who would make toast generally look at the color of the bread/toast to determine if the bread is toasted the way they like it. I.e. white = untoasted bread, black = burned, with all the shades of brown in between.

At the time Crayola Crayons were the defacto standard for colors that everybody used since they were kids, and this is what the manufacturers turned to. So the number '1' on the toaster is the 'color' toast you get same as if you melted one white crayon with one burnt umber crayon. (Remember they were working on toasters so it was easy to melt the crayons.) The number '2' means one white crayon melted with 2 burnt umber crayons, the number '3' means one white crayon with 3 burnt umber crayons, and so on.

If you don't believe me you can visit the Crayola Experience Museum in Easton PA and validate this for yourself.


Oof, do these queries keep you up at night?
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When the manufacturers of the first toasters were deciding how to 'calibrate' the dials vs. the numbers they had no standards to go by.  They decided that the people who would make toast generally look at the color of the bread/toast to determine if the bread is toasted the way they like it.  I.e. white = untoasted bread, black = burned, with all the shades of brown in between.

 

At the time Crayola Crayons were the defacto standard for colors that everybody used since they were kids, and this is what the manufacturers turned to.  So the number '1' on the toaster is the 'color' toast you get same as if you melted one white crayon with one burnt umber crayon. (Remember they were working on toasters so it was easy to melt the crayons.)  The number '2' means one white crayon melted with 2 burnt umber crayons, the number '3' means one white crayon with 3 burnt umber crayons, and so on.

 

If you don't believe me you can visit the Crayola Experience Museum in Easton PA and validate this for yourself.

 

If you are going to lie, at least make it just a bit believable.  Jeesh.  Burnt umber?  Men see in only 16 colors and 'BURNT UMBER' is not one of them.

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