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Damn, this stuff is gooood!


Philander Seabury
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Wow, that looks good!!! Send me some! :-)

I would if I could!  They might distribute down in your neck of the woods.  This might be my new favourite style. :)

 

From the beeradvocate website:

Baltic Porter

Description:
Porters of the late 1700's were quite strong compared to todays standards, easily surpassing 7% alcohol by volume. Some brewers made a stronger, more robust version, to be shipped across the North Sea, dubbed a Baltic Porter. In general, the styles dark brown color covered up cloudiness and the smoky/roasted brown malts and bitter tastes masked brewing imperfections. The addition of stale ale also lent a pleasant acidic flavor to the style, which made it quite popular. These issues were quite important given that most breweries were getting away from pub brewing and opening up breweries that could ship beer across the world.

 

Hmm - just found a new site to me, brewwiki.  It agrees more with what Wikipedia says, that it is sort of related to Russian Imperial Stout.

 

http://brewwiki.com/index.php/Baltic_Porter

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I just brewed a chocolate version of that. The beer is in the secondary right now, I'll bottle next weekend.   I could talk with you for hours about why the style originated and the variations.  Z - I might send you some one day.

So get started!  Funny - good as this is, Yuengling Porter comes pretty darn close when you consider it is aboot half the price. :D

 

Hey Old#7 - one of the things that make me hesitant to get started in homebrewing is futzing around with bottles, the sterilisation and sheer drudgery of so many containers.  Isn't there an economical way to do something like cask beer? 

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So get started!  Funny - good as this is, Yuengling Porter comes pretty darn close when you consider it is aboot half the price. :D

 

Hey Old#7 - one of the things that make me hesitant to get started in homebrewing is futzing around with bottles, the sterilisation and sheer drudgery of so many containers.  Isn't there an economical way to do something like cask beer? 

Kegging is an option but the intial investment always scared me away.  Kegs, regulators, CO2 tank, keggerator/fridge will run $400 to $500.  I can cut the work down by using more 22 oz bottles and fewer 12 oz bottles but by the time I'm done it's not all that much work.  An average 5 gallons fills 6 22 oz bombers and most of two cases 12 oz bottles.

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Kegging is an option but the intial investment always scared me away.  Kegs, regulators, CO2 tank, keggerator/fridge will run $400 to $500.  I can cut the work down by using more 22 oz bottles and fewer 12 oz bottles but by the time I'm done it's not all that much work.  An average 5 gallons fills 6 22 oz bombers and most of two cases 12 oz bottles.

But what about naturally carbonated cask beer, aka real ale?  I'd think all you need is a container to fit in the fridge?

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But what about naturally carbonated cask beer, aka real ale?  I'd think all you need is a container to fit in the fridge?


The problem with it is dispensing. It's usually done with a hand pump, which uses air to displace the beer. This means it gets stale quickly - no problem if you're having a party, since it won't last long enough to go stale.

You can push them with CO2, but that kind of negates the benefits of cask conditioning.
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I just brewed a chocolate version of that. The beer is in the secondary right now, I'll bottle next weekend.   I could talk with you for hours about why the style originated and the variations.  Z - I might send you some one day.

I saw the pics on FB and it looked great.  When we finally get a chance to meet up again I am going to need to taste that one!

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