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So she was JW but ok had nice chat


shootingstar

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While at a cafe, a pleasant Asian woman  4 tables away, dropped by and complimented me on my bike helmet, fitness, etc. She wanted to know about general ways of managing weight, etc. She was Chinese-Vietnamese..which I usually interpret as more Vietnamese in food origin preferences. (I asked what her background was. Asian-North Americans sometimes might ask one another, if social occasion makes it easier to find certain connections. Then you slip into any shared food tips, where one lived.. etc.)  I did highlight and credit my mother for healthy food eating foundations.  I often do because it has influenced what I've been eating, cooking as an adult.

She was asking because she wanted to lose some weight, become healthier.  She was a mother of 2 twin boys who will be leaving home for college and jobs in trades. 

Then she gave me a card about the Bible readings on the 'Net.  She was Jehovah's Witness.

I always am a bit disappointed when this happens. I have close, long-term friends who are Christian but they don't prosethlytize.  They just live their faith. 

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34 minutes ago, jsharr said:

It is a scam.  If you go to the web page of supposed Bible readings you will be asked about your car's extended warranty.

I don't have the card she gave me any more.

Anyway, interestingly she told me her boys will be enrolled this fall for RV technician repair work.  There's only 6 students enrolled in this only provincial college program (not sure if it's 1 yr. or so) and already some firms are vying to hire once students finish. 

She's trying to eat healthier but finds it challenging when her boys eat differently before leaving home.

 

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It is the charge of any who follow Christ to both live their faith and to share their faith.  To use the word written here, Jesus Himself ‘proselytized’.  He both lived out His calling and He beckoned others to follow; both those who became the twelve and any who would ‘take up their cross’. He spoke truth. He exhorted those at His ascension, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.”

Different people do this in different ways. 
 

If you love something or truly enjoy a particular activity (cycling, nature, the arts, etc.) you’ll most likely at some point share that with someone else in hopes that they might discover the same joy.  This is no different.  A follower who has experienced the full extent of grace will want that for others. 
 

Peace

 

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2 hours ago, Zealot said:

If you love something or truly enjoy a particular activity (cycling, nature, the arts, etc.) you’ll most likely at some point share that with someone else in hopes that they might discover the same joy.  This is no different.  A follower who has experienced the full extent of grace will want that for others. 
 

Peace

 

Some of my closest, long-time friends are Christians...these friendships fall into 50-30 yrs. longevity so far :   We know each other very well and have supported each other for all the changes in our lives. 

On occasion, I've gone to church with each of them, because it was not asking anything much of me.  They also belong to non-evangelical churches. Some of their churches do social justice work which can reinvigorate the meaning of Christ's work.  

Though Mennonite is different and more strict. 

It was also way for me to know part of her.  But no, none of these friends talk about the Bible to me.  It's just like any good, close friendship --sharing joy, fun and weakness with one another.

 

 

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She wanted to know more about fitness and way of eating to support her wellbeing, and you shared your experience and knowledge with her about those habits for living. She hoped you would want to know more about faith in Christ and would willingly share her experience and knowledge with you. But you aren’t interested. I don’t see proselytizing in the transaction, except maybe for the benefits of an active lifestyle and eating light. 🙃

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19 hours ago, shootingstar said:

(I asked what her background was. Asian-North Americans sometimes might ask one another, if social occasion makes it easier to find certain connections. Then you slip into any shared food tips, where one lived.. etc.)

So do the rest of us. It’s how we make conversation. 

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23 hours ago, MoseySusan said:

So do the rest of us. It’s how we make conversation. 

Her identification to me as Chinese-Vietnamese, was not typical response, since she was very specific, but it's good.  

It indicates to me, she's been in enough social situations that it was simply easier to be specific about her cultural-linguistic identification.  I may ask later in a conversation, or other Asians ask one another sometimes wks., months later, because it is a cultural-linguistic question.   I don't want to drop into the conversation terminology/words by mistake, if I assume the person is Chinese, when they are not.  

Over the yrs., a number of Canadians of Cambodian, Vietnamese and Filipino descent, volunteer info. to me that  their grandparent or parent, etc. is Chinese.  It's like a gesture, making a connection with me.  

With a Caucasian person I don't ask.  I never asked you (initially) nor petite.  If the person speaks a familial, non-English, European language from childhood onward, they will pretty soon self-identify to me...as dearie did for me.  As all my hairstylists I've had (Italian, Iranian, Croatian).  Which is not surprising if raised by immigrant parents or they are immigrant themselves.  

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6 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

None of this changes the common conversation about a person’s background, their people, their cultural experiences. 

Yeah but no but yeah but WHAT?!?!?  

Did you miss the bit about:"Then she gave me a card"???  That's fairly non-traditional "conversation" process. 

I think what you may be confusing as "conversation" is what sales people (and con men) are trained to do to make a "sale".  But, as we've started to see, most of life is headed toward transactionalism. :(  

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48 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

I think what you may be confusing as "conversation" is what sales people (and con men) are trained to do to make a "sale"

I’m focused on the part where @shootingstar asks the other woman about her background. Through my kitchen window, we all make conversation by asking about background. It’s not unique to “Asian-North Americans”.

On 2/2/2024 at 2:01 PM, shootingstar said:

(I asked what her background was. Asian-North Americans sometimes might ask one another, if social occasion makes it easier to find certain connections. Then you slip into any shared food tips, where one lived.. etc.)

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1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

If the person speaks a familial, non-English, European language from childhood onward, they will pretty soon self-identify to me...as dearie did for me.  As all my hairstylists I've had (Italian, Iranian, Croatian).  Which is not surprising if raised by immigrant parents or they are immigrant themselves.

And to each of us as we get to know others. I’m not convinced that you alone can claim this as conversational ground. That you experience conversations about people’s backgrounds I am not denying. Being a participant in conversations about home languages or ethnicity is common ground.

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1 hour ago, MoseySusan said:

And to each of us as we get to know others. I’m not convinced that you alone can claim this as conversational ground. That you experience conversations about people’s backgrounds I am not denying. Being a participant in conversations about home languages or ethnicity is common ground.

I'm only explaining what I do. I don't ask Caucasians on specific ethnicity.  The question has been are they local all along?  I don't ask that question of Asians quite in the same way.  After all, I can't suss out in advance accurately, which Asian ethnicity they are.  Sometimes by their accent, I may guess.  So better, I ask if it's fuzzy.

When I was in Japan and S. Korea, I did wonder amongst the hordes of tourists, just which folks were non-Japanese Asians. Hearing them speak, I could figure it out, but not all the time.  It WAS the first time in my life being in a totally Asian country.  It's not even the same experience as walking in Toronto and Vancouver surrounded by a ton of other Asians.  Not at all. Absolutely not, because of the whole different cultural ambience and knowing official language is not English (nor French).

2 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

Did you miss the bit about:"Then she gave me a card"???  That's fairly non-traditional "conversation" process. 

I think what you may be confusing as "conversation" is what sales people (and con men) are trained to do to make a "sale".  But, as we've started to see, most of life is headed toward transactionalism. :(  

She pulled out the card with website at the end.  It is not common in a non-business relationship.  For sure, it happens in semi-business relationship.  Remember when we used to carry and exchange biz cards.. even for non-profit community organizational work.

I'm pretty certain my long-time Christian friends don't even do this at all in their personal relationships. I've been with them for so long (1 of them, we grew up together as early teens onward), participated in events/family stuff together, stayed with them in homes/travelled together for days. But then, as I said earlier they belong to non-evangelical churches.  Exception is the Mennonite friend who did give me a Bible. That was all.  

But then, such good, long-term friendships began and are sustained over decades, by completely different common interests, other shared experiences that hold us together 1-to-1 which their religious affiliation is very secondary /even tertiary to our care for one another.... over a very long time. 30, 40 and 50 yrs. is a very long time for close friendship.  :) 

 

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On 2/2/2024 at 4:01 PM, shootingstar said:

While at a cafe, a pleasant Asian woman  4 tables away, dropped by and complimented me on my bike helmet, fitness, etc. She wanted to know about general ways of managing weight, etc. She was Chinese-Vietnamese..which I usually interpret as more Vietnamese in food origin preferences. (I asked what her background was. Asian-North Americans sometimes might ask one another, if social occasion makes it easier to find certain connections. Then you slip into any shared food tips, where one lived.. etc.)  I did highlight and credit my mother for healthy food eating foundations.  I often do because it has influenced what I've been eating, cooking as an adult.

She was asking because she wanted to lose some weight, become healthier.  She was a mother of 2 twin boys who will be leaving home for college and jobs in trades. 

Then she gave me a card about the Bible readings on the 'Net.  She was Jehovah's Witness.

I always am a bit disappointed when this happens. I have close, long-term friends who are Christian but they don't prosethlytize.  They just live their faith. 

I don't mind people playing missionary for their religion, but when they become devious to gain your trust or keep insisting on pushing their faith on you it makes me angry.

When I get bothered by JW's and born-agains, I try to convert them to "my" religion and tell them the world was created when God commanded angels to sing.  As they sung smoothly they created oceans and plains and when they hit hard notes, they competed with each other in stressed notes and that caused the formation of mountains, rivers, islands, etc..

I tell them they can find out all about it in the Silmarillion, written down by J.R.R. Tolkien.  In four of his other books, one of these angels named Gandalf became a great friend of the humans, elves, dwarfs, and hobbits that eventually lived on the land.

When they start to walk away, I call after them. "Oh, so you don't like to be harassed with religious nonsense either, do you?"

I almost wrecked my car when I laughed so hard after seeing a bumper sticker that read, "Born OK the first time."

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30 minutes ago, Shu Fang said:

"JW" is considered a pejorative term by the Church's members.

Couch

I don't know the naming etiquette for all the different Christian denominations/groups. Actually I don't know any naming etiquette in this area at all.  In my head, I lump all Christians in group, then Jews (which  is a bit closer to Christians, well sorta), Buddhists, Muslims, etc. in big huge separate crowds.

For sure, I was not going to put Jehovah's Witness in the Cafe post title.

 

 

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