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The year of the Dragon


petitepedal

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8 minutes ago, Parsnip Totin Jack said:

Put the dragon brisket on the smoker and cook it low and slow. Real tasty and healthier than fried. Speaking of frying, I’m making shrimp and pork egg rolls on Saturday. Better than takeout. 

Good tip!

We had take out Chinese a couple days ago. I always realize that I like most other Asian food much more than Chinese. Not sure why, but give me Thai or sushi or Indian any day over most Chinese.

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30 minutes ago, Parsnip Totin Jack said:

Put the dragon brisket on the smoker and cook it low and slow. Real tasty and healthier than fried. Speaking of frying, I’m making shrimp and pork egg rolls on Saturday. Better than takeout. 

Homemade is most often, always better.

51 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Dragon fruit.   How to Eat Dragon Fruit and Why You Should Try It

A very lovely fruit to eat!   As an appetizer or after a meal.

Everyone in SQW can eat this...it's quite mild in taste.  The texture is a touch more solid than watermelon, but same mouth feel.

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23 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Good tip!

We had take out Chinese a couple days ago. I always realize that I like most other Asian food much more than Chinese. Not sure why, but give me Thai or sushi or Indian any day over most Chinese.

There's a ton of different Chinese dishes across 8 different regional cuisines ... order a lighter style dish.

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1 hour ago, petitepedal said:

Chinese New Year...starts February 10.

How will you celebrate?

I’d like to see a lantern festival later in the celebrations. Mostly, I’m getting excited about defending my luck, wealth, and good fortune by laying off the sweeping and yoga pants! 

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25 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

I’d like to see a lantern festival later in the celebrations. Mostly, I’m getting excited about defending my luck, wealth, and good fortune by laying off the sweeping and yoga pants! 

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Ok, I wasn't aware of killing animals. So probably kill the chicken night before...to cook it next day.  I wasn't aware of no porridge. Thank god my parents weren't so superstitious. :whistle:  How can one live normally?  

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19 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

The website also says on the first day to keep children from crying by any means possible. A great day to be a child! 

My parents never had interest in feng shui.  However I'm certain they would never want to buy a house near cemetery. 

Though I'm not interested in feng shui, I do believe in certain locations of a city, there's better karma than others for small businesses to succeed more easily. One can sometimes even sense "good" karma just walking into a business for a few min.

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1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

There's a ton of different Chinese dishes across 8 different regional cuisines ... order a lighter style dish.

Remember other Asian countries celebrate the new year similarly.  Vietnam’s, Thai & others.  You could get some pho or pad tai as well.  

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13 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

Remember other Asian countries celebrate the new year similarly.  Vietnam’s, Thai & others.  You could get some pho or pad tai as well.  

True!

2 hours ago, shootingstar said:

There's a ton of different Chinese dishes across 8 different regional cuisines ... order a lighter style dish.

I do like Chinese/Asian fusion a lot.  

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51 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

My parents never had interest in feng shui

Did they carry forward any principles of placement of objects for luck, blessings, ward off the negative? My mom hung crucifixes above the doorways in the house, and my dad hung a horseshoe above the garage doorway. Those are the only household energy charms I remember. Luck and blessings. 

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3 minutes ago, MoseySusan said:

Did they carry forward any principles of placement of objects for luck, blessings, ward off the negative? My mom hung crucifixes above the doorways in the house, and my dad hung a horseshoe above the garage doorway. Those are the only household energy charms I remember. Luck and blessings. 

My mom had a brass gecko she hung on the wall in the living room.  Apparently they are an Indonesian good luck charm and having one living in your home was considered a good omen.  

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17 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

a brass gecko… good luck charm 

I used to have a brass crucifix that was a wedding present. It had two rings attached to it as a sign that our marriage was blessed. I got rid of it after mr and I left the Christian faith. I do have a Turkish blue glass “evil eye” that wards off evil and a red front door. 

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1 hour ago, MoseySusan said:

Did they carry forward any principles of placement of objects for luck, blessings, ward off the negative? My mom hung crucifixes above the doorways in the house, and my dad hung a horseshoe above the garage doorway. Those are the only household energy charms I remember. Luck and blessings. 

 

1 hour ago, ChrisL said:

My mom had a brass gecko she hung on the wall in the living room.  Apparently they are an Indonesian good luck charm and having one living in your home was considered a good omen.  

Very interesting.

No, my parents didn't seem have any symbols of luck, blessings.

We did have a little head statute for Kwan Yin, goddess of mercy on top of the TV for years.:whistle:  I don't know if any sibling claimed that (cheapo) statue from my parents or it shattered/broke sometime ago.  But I perceived that by my parents, as more decorative.  

Red, in general is seen as a nice colour to wear in a piece of clothing during celebratory times. But we didn't all in family, consciously do it.  But it is nice to have some cultural practices to fall back on....as a great good reason to do it.  There IS a reason why among some Asians, the tendency to wear red at certain times.

3 of my married sisters, did wear all-red or solid magenta pink going-way dress for their weddings.  It looks fantastic...honestly when one's natural  hair colouring is black, for a happy occasion. 

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1 hour ago, ChrisL said:

My mom had a brass gecko she hung on the wall in the living room.  Apparently they are an Indonesian good luck charm and having one living in your home was considered a good omen.  

That would be a cool cultural practice to reintroduce...especially to little CJ.  I bet he would love it...and carry it forward. He will want some cool stuff to carry forward...besides satay-making.

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1 minute ago, shootingstar said:

That would be a cool cultural practice to reintroduce...especially to little CJ.  I bet he would love it...and carry it forward. He will want some cool stuff to carry forward...besides satay-making.

My son is taking over satay duties and he has it down pretty good now.  I think by the time CJ is ready to learn I’ll already be retired from satay making so he’ll learn from his uncle.  

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3 hours ago, ChrisL said:

My son is taking over satay duties and he has it down pretty good now.  I think by the time CJ is ready to learn I’ll already be retired from satay making so he’ll learn from his uncle.  

For your extended family, the satay-making seemed like a big job.

No idea, if any of my sisters with kids, will be passing down certain heritage food dishes for preparation, that is from either side of family. Not sure what it would be. 

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5 hours ago, MoseySusan said:

I used to have a brass crucifix that was a wedding present. It had two rings attached to it as a sign that our marriage was blessed. I got rid of it after mr and I left the Christian faith. I do have a Turkish blue glass “evil eye” that wards off evil and a red front door. 

I did get souvenier cruxifix from Sagrada Familia, Gaudi's church in Barcelona which will be finally finished I think this yr. or something like that.  Sagrada Familia: Gaudi’s Church of Flowering Spirit, Exaltation, Chaotic Life and Sanctuary – Cycle Write Blog (wordpress.com)   It is simply lying down on my fireplace mantle.

I do go into cathedrals, churches and temples worldwide, in hopes of seeing interesting architecture / liturgical art, including the stained glass art. 

Often I find there is much to learn ..culturally the historic arc of art and architecture outside of North America  -- in some historic bldgs. 

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2 hours ago, shootingstar said:

For your extended family, the satay-making seemed like a big job.

No idea, if any of my sisters with kids, will be passing down certain heritage food dishes for preparation, that is from either side of family. Not sure what it would be. 

It was/is a big job that takes days of prep before the actual event.  The meat has to marinade at least overnight so it has to be cut, marinated, skewered and then cooked.  Each step is a process in of itself. 

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Lion dance that 1 sees around Chinese /Lunar New Year's celebration  requires alot of practice, stamina, strength, etc.  It uses some kung fu stances.. @petitepedal  I'm not sure I would want to do alot of squats..develop more on top of cycling leg muscles! And new arm muscles.  Or jumping around, hot underneath all that fabric-paper mache costume creature.  :lol:

'Doing squats the whole time': Chinese lion dance brings good fortune and sore muscles | CBC News

For centuries, it was primarily men who would do this lion dance. Women were considered bad luck to perform.  But changed in past decade world-wide.  More women are bringing roaring passion to the traditionally male-dominated lion dance | CBC News  I didn't know until this yr., VAncouver Chinatown had a all-female lion dance team back in the 1940's.  

Lion dancers, Calgary 2023.

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@ChrisL  After your comments on satay-making, I realized I don't yet have true, cool/time-consuming Chinese dishes to pass down.  But then I realized, I have some stories to pass along in my blog...they are for next generations and anyone else interested. 

Some posts really are written with photos to capture the evidence.  Some of the art featured in post, now has been vandalized.

 More than Just Dragons- Art on Chinese-Canadian Experience – Cycle Write Blog (wordpress.com)

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I'll show my 15 1/2 year-old nephew Adam, who's now taller than me, the picture of him at age 7 in 2015 with me and a Komodo Dragon!

School was closed for the day, I was watching him and said, "Let's go to the National Zoo in D.C."  It's just over an hour's drive for us.  He also took a cute picture (below) with a female orangutan staring at him and with a peacock, gorilla, and giant panda and more on a fun day with free admission and $28 all-day parking and we found a spot just 100 ft from the first exhibit.

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Some guy had bird seed to attract the birds in the bird sanctuary, gave Adam some, and he bravely let the peacock peck it right out of his hand. I don't think I showed Lori, Adam's mother, this picture. Maybe I'll do it on Sunday at the family Super Bowl Party.

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Baltimore Archbishop Lewandowski reaching up to bless 6'3"+ Adam during Catholic Confirmation on Nov. 3, '23:

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6'3"+ Adam when I took him to Archery Training last Summer:

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“Dragon statuary at a water purification trough. Nara Park, Japan 2018. Photo by J.Chong“

I love that we are discouraged from washing laundry on Lunar New Year because the water gods are out and about  offering greetings and it would be considered offensive to be found sloshing around in the wash water. 
 

Are you a fan of Studio Ghibli Japanese animation and Hayao Miyazaki? His stories are filled with Japanese spiritual elements and mythology. His own dreamscapes… 

Ooo..I think I’ll watch Spirited Away this weekend! 

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1 hour ago, MoseySusan said:

“Dragon statuary at a water purification trough. Nara Park, Japan 2018. Photo by J.Chong“

I love that we are discouraged from washing laundry on Lunar New Year because the water gods are out and about  offering greetings and it would be considered offensive to be found sloshing around in the wash water. 
 

Are you a fan of Studio Ghibli Japanese animation and Hayao Miyazaki? His stories are filled with Japanese spiritual elements and mythology. His own dreamscapes… 

Ooo..I think I’ll watch Spirited Away this weekend! 

That water purification area was by a Shinto shrine that we walked by.

I have yet to be familiar with key Japanese animators and writers.  

There was a Japanese-authored book, I read a summary in bookstore:  Sort of dystopian world where the protagonist is trying to hang the most valuable thing we have:  our memories.  Memories of what we did, who we loved, who loved us, etc.  Not sure I feel like reading such a dark book.

Spirited Away sounds like a physical and psychological/magical adventure:  Burying his naturalism within the hoard of Earth-bound spirits, the director venerates humanity’s gifts for bravery, perseverance, friendship and, above all, fantasy on his way to telling a story about the gift of love. Spirited Away has become one of Studio Ghibli’s most acclaimed and unanimously beloved films, and it is quite easy to see why. A careful reframing of the typical coming-of-age narrative, Spirited Away displays a fondness of those infinitely awkward years, while showing us all how important they were in making us who we are today.

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