Jump to content

Passed some trial citizenship test questions


shootingstar

Recommended Posts

...as the common  thought, that even Canadian-borns, may not score 100% correct on a citizenship test  taken by permanent residents/landed immigrants.  A survey company found only 23% of CAnadians could answer at least 7 of random questions correctly, etc. No idea what those questions were.

I got 15 out of 20 for select set of questions. Simply passed. That's all.  Some questions, I answered correctly, only because I worked for several different govn'ts.  There is no way, if I was an immigrant (unless I worked in mother country govn't) to understand/remember all sorts of differences on legal and administrative authority for different levels of govn't.  Anyway....

Didn't get 1 of the questions right: lst province (Manitoba) that gave the right to vote for women (it would be white women first only. Before other women got right to vote, several decades later.)  

How do American-borns fare on the citizenship test?  If there is one..

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • shootingstar changed the title to Passed some trial citizenship test questions

Edit:

The Wartime Elections Act of 1917 granted the federal franchise to the female relatives of men in the military (army or navy, active or retired). The law extended the right to vote to Canadian Black women related to Black servicemen — roughly 1,400 Black men were able to enlist, 600 of whom served in the segregated No. 2 Construction Battalion

Black Voting Rights in Canada | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

How do American-borns fare on the citizenship test?  If there is one..

Both of my parrents were US citizens born in the US.  I was born in the US.   No test for me. (or my parrents)

That said there is a test for immigrants. 

https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/document/questions-and-answers/100q.pdf

  • Heart 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

Both of my parrents were US citizens born in the US.  I was born in the US.   No test for me. (or my parrents)

That said there is a test for immigrants. 

https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/document/questions-and-answers/100q.pdf

I was born in Hamilton, ON. I don't need to be tested. 

My father would have passed. I think he got his citizenship a few years after 1951 when he landed in Canada.  My mother did her citizenship test/got it....when I was already...20 yrs. old.  We, her children did help coach her on preparation for tests.  Mother does have a memory when she puts her mind to it...even if she doesn't know much English.

NOW....folks I have a long-time white friend, one of her American parents didn't even bother to get their citizenship until 50 yrs. later after they moved to CAnada (Ontario) with their very young 3 children at the time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, shootingstar said:

...as the common  thought, that even Canadian-borns, may not score 100% correct on a citizenship test  taken by permanent residents/landed immigrants.  A survey company found only 23% of CAnadians could answer at least 7 of random questions correctly, etc. No idea what those questions were.

I got 15 out of 20 for select set of questions. Simply passed. That's all.  Some questions, I answered correctly, only because I worked for several different govn'ts.  There is no way, if I was an immigrant (unless I worked in mother country govn't) to understand/remember all sorts of differences on legal and administrative authority for different levels of govn't.  Anyway....

Didn't get 1 of the questions right: lst province (Manitoba) that gave the right to vote for women (it would be white women first only. Before other women got right to vote, several decades later.)  

How do American-borns fare on the citizenship test?  If there is one..

Most Americans can't pass.  The test requires studying.

  • Heart 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Most Americans can't pass.  The test requires studying.

After looking at the questions...  I'd most likely pass.  Most of those questions were very easy for me.

5 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Now, if you ask them questions similar to "make a list of Taylor Swift's ex boyfriends" or who did Usher marry this last weekend they could probably ace it.  Not the old farts of course but the young ones.

I'd flunk that test.  And I'm proud that I'd flunk. :party:  Stuff like this is a waste of my time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

After looking at the questions...  I'd most likely pass.  Most of those questions were very easy for me.

I'd flunk that test.  And I'm proud that I'd flunk. :party:  Stuff like this is a waste of my time. 

This is a rather well educated group compared to the average.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

You must hate Jeopardy :D

I've participated in 2 annual Corporate trivia game contests in recent past...teams from different depts. answer well over 25-30 different questions. Last yr. there were 15 depts. which was higher than other years. Then winning team goes against teams from local firms and non-profit for big win.

I always am poor at entertainment and sports.  My knowledge of entertainment is highly selective and dated. I don't even know enough within my own peak teen and 20's yrs.

It was lots of fun. The Law dept. won (they had 2 teams) which doesn't surprise me...if one knows the background of lawyers. 

  • Hugs 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

This is a rather well educated group compared to the average.

Yes for SQW and also a group more conscious about healthy lifestyle.  It doesn't mean we're all marathon guys and gals, but we're receptive to good reliable info. and have tried stuff in past and present to be good.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, shootingstar said:

I've participated in 2 annual Corporate trivia game contests in recent past...teams from different depts. answer well over 25-30 different questions. Last yr. there were 15 depts. which was higher than other years. Then winning team goes against teams from local firms and non-profit for big win.

I always am poor at entertainment and sports.  My knowledge of entertainment is highly selective and dated. I don't even know enough within my own peak teen and 20's yrs.

It was lots of fun. The Law dept. won (they had 2 teams) which doesn't surprise me...if one knows the background of lawyers. 

2 teams.........injury and taxes?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

2 teams.........injury and taxes?

These are lawyers in govn't... bylaws/ordinances, employment law, civil-criminal damages, contract law (with private sector, provincial govn't and federal govn't), OHS, freedom of info., real property (encroachments, real estate matters for municipal property and exappropriation), etc.  Most lawyers have 2, if not also 3 degrees. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, shootingstar said:

These are lawyers in govn't... bylaws/ordinances, employment law, civil-criminal damages, contract law (with private sector, provincial govn't and federal govn't), OHS, freedom of info., real property (encroachments, real estate matters for municipal property and exappropriation), etc.  Most lawyers have 2, if not also 3 degrees. 

Ah.  Private practice teams..........linjury, taxes, politics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, shootingstar said:

...as the common  thought, that even Canadian-borns, may not score 100% correct on a citizenship test  taken by permanent residents/landed immigrants.  A survey company found only 23% of CAnadians could answer at least 7 of random questions correctly, etc. No idea what those questions were.

I got 15 out of 20 for select set of questions. Simply passed. That's all.  Some questions, I answered correctly, only because I worked for several different govn'ts.  There is no way, if I was an immigrant (unless I worked in mother country govn't) to understand/remember all sorts of differences on legal and administrative authority for different levels of govn't.  Anyway....

Didn't get 1 of the questions right: lst province (Manitoba) that gave the right to vote for women (it would be white women first only. Before other women got right to vote, several decades later.)  

How do American-borns fare on the citizenship test?  If there is one..

Knowing which area of a country first gave women the right to vote in the distant past does NOT make that person a better citizen.

Knowing WHY women should have the right to vote does.

I'm sure the American test has similar "politically correct" questions.

Am I'm sure we have American Congressmen who can't name the three branches of government and their duties.

 

  • Heart 1
  • Thank You 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My parents had to go through a whole process and take a test to become citizens.  I think they took classes too.  But this was before I was born so only remember through stories told 50 years ago.

What I do remember was my dad being upset about the Vietnamese immigrants not having to go through the same immigration process to become citizens as they did. 

But I’m not sure if the current process…

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

My parents had to go through a whole process and take a test to become citizens.  I think they took classes too.  But this was before I was born so only remember through stories told 50 years ago.

What I do remember was my dad being upset about the Vietnamese immigrants not having to go through the same immigration process to become citizens as they did. 

But I’m not sure if the current process…

Interesting for Vietnamese immigrants at that time in history.  I have no idea if Canada made some temporary changes.  I am aware after a certain age, one doesn't have to do the citizenship question test. 

Before applying for citizenship in Canada, first there is in general, a minimal requirement of permanent resident status that you have to have lst for first few years in CAnada.  You  literally get a govn't ID card that states you are a permanent resident, but not a citizen. There are certain rights as a citizen...ie. voting and formal eligibility for certain govn't benefits.

Come to think of it, I don't think my father applied for and got his citizenship until maybe I was 2-3 yrs. old. He was already in CAnada for over a decade but he hadn't mastered enough English. There were no English language classes for adults in small town.   In 1950's, no classes on TV (nor radio).  Then in bigger city, his work schedule didn't allow it..since he slept partially during day before his afternoon-evening work shift until 1:00 am.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, shootingstar said:

Based on their participation in debates or when they meet their local folks?

Both.  I was heavily involved in County, State, and Federal politics in my county for a couple decades and it's stunning to learn how much they don't know.  I served as Vice Chairman of my County's Landfill Laws Commission, as our County Executive's Representative to our State Legislative Caucus, and interacted with Federal organizations when I was named head of our state environmental watchdog group under the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

In each case, there were Senators, Congressmen, Delegates, County Councilmen, etc. involved and with whom I interacted and their strengths were in raising money to run, telling bar owners when health dept. inspections were going to happen, etc. but they knew little else.

When our Landfill Laws Committee was developing laws for things like how far a landfill must be from the nearest community, how water should be allowed to flow around flyash-filled residential and commercial sites, etc. we asked the U.S. Government's EPA to send people to make sure we were in sync with Federal Laws.  The guys they sent picked OUR brains because they didn't have a clue about how far rats will migrate from a waste site, how solid the flyash becomes underground, etc.  They went back to Washington and pretended they thought up new laws!

When our County Executive sued the State Government and U.S. Coast Guard for wanting to move hazardous waste onto a site in our County, Bob Pascal, the County Exec, phoned me and my boss at a subsidiary of Dow Chemical to ask me to testify in the trial as the County's expert witness.

I was stunned the county didn't have ANY employee who could do the job.

When I testified the unlined steel drums would leak, the defense lawyers questioned my expertise, the judge allowed me as an expert but said he failed chemistry in high school and I was pretty much ignored.  The following Spring, I got phone calls from the local news media telling me the Coast Guard announced the drums were leaking.

Fortunately, the local head of the Coast Guard, William Kime who went on to become head of all the Coast Guard, and I were friendly and even drove to some of the sites in question together in my or his car.  He agreed to put a lined floor and berm in the building where the waste was being kept, so the leaks didn't get into the ground water.

So, instead of doing the "I told you so" about the leaks, I praised Bill and the Coast Guard for taking protective action.  You don't want to bite the hands of those who work in your favor.

So, in general, it's shocking how little elected officials know.

  • Heart 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

Both.  I was heavily involved in County, State, and Federal politics in my county for a couple decades and it's stunning to learn how much they don't know.  I served as Vice Chairman of my County's Landfill Laws Commission, as our County Executive's Representative to our State Legislative Caucus, and interacted with Federal organizations when I was named head of our state environmental watchdog group under the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

In each case, there were Senators, Congressmen, Delegates, County Councilmen, etc. involved and with whom I interacted and their strengths were in raising money to run, telling bar owners when health dept. inspections were going to happen, etc. but they knew little else.

When our Landfill Laws Committee was developing laws for things like how far a landfill must be from the nearest community, how water should be allowed to flow around flyash-filled residential and commercial sites, etc. we asked the U.S. Government's EPA to send people to make sure we were in sync with Federal Laws.  The guys they sent picked OUR brains because they didn't have a clue about how far rats will migrate from a waste site, how solid the flyash becomes underground, etc.  They went back to Washington and pretended they thought up new laws!

When our County Executive sued the State Government and U.S. Coast Guard for wanting to move hazardous waste onto a site in our County, Bob Pascal, the County Exec, phoned me and my boss at a subsidiary of Dow Chemical to ask me to testify in the trial as the County's expert witness.

I was stunned the county didn't have ANY employee who could do the job.

There's probably still some cluelessness going on in a few smaller rural areas. 

In the end, it would be  local govn't..senior management, not just elected officials, taking responsibility to become familiar with new /changed legislative requirements, including technical requirements.  We under -estimate the role of senior management in govn't to implement new changes in law. Which means right staff are trained/hired.  And support those staff also.

Elected officials don't have true understanding in detail, what it is required to implement new/changed law, programs/services. The elected official might know a small corner of services/issues. Then onto the next issue, etc. It doesn't excuse them from not knowing the basics of govn't levels and which govn't has whatever authority.

I would expect every municipal elected official to understand what legal powers and responsiblities a municipality has vs. provincial or federal govn't.  They should already have some knowledge when elected.  The reverse is true also: a provincial elected representative or federal, should understand scope of legal authority for certain major areas of  services/programs.

BAck to some original discussion:

image.thumb.png.44e48c4b202130d0d8bbbd5b9dd82b52.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

There's probably still some cluelessness going on in a few smaller rural areas. 

In the end, it would be  local govn't..senior management, not just elected officials, taking responsibility to become familiar with new /changed legislative requirements, including technical requirements.  We under -estimate the role of senior management in govn't to implement new changes in law. Which means right staff are trained/hired.  And support those staff also.

Elected officials don't have true understanding in detail, what it is required to implement new/changed law, programs/services. The elected official might know a small corner of services/issues. Then onto the next issue, etc. It doesn't excuse them from not knowing the basics of govn't levels and which govn't has whatever authority.

I would expect every municipal elected official to understand what legal powers and responsiblities a municipality has vs. provincial or federal govn't.  They should already have some knowledge when elected. 

BAck to some original discussion:

image.thumb.png.44e48c4b202130d0d8bbbd5b9dd82b52.png

Far more than you could possibly immagine.  This is a country were large blocks of people think drinking bleach can cure covid.

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Razors Edge said:

You must hate Jeopardy :D

We used to watch all the time.  Then  Alex died.  We watched for a while, and somewhere along the way we stopped watching. 

Our friends and us would enter trivia contests.  They would bring 1 or 2 or their children who are in their late 20s.  Having a diversity in age helped with the more recent music, people,  etc...

  • Heart 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Bikeguy said:

We used to watch all the time.  Then  Alex died.  We watched for a while, and somewhere along the way we stopped watching. 

Our friends and us would enter trivia contests.  They would bring 1 or 2 or their children who are in their late 20s.  Having a diversity in age helped with the more recent music, people,  etc...

It would be fun to have a wide range of age groups participating in a trivia game.

In the last year's trivia team I was on, I was the oldest. Then 2 others in their late 40's-50's.  4th team member was a polite, bright university, late-Gen Z summer student (political science).  We did notice he didn't get 1-3 questions on recent history trivia in late 1950's -1960's.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...