Jump to content

The War of 1812


AirwickWithCheese
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm beginning to question your sincerity.
To be clear, I feel you intentionally tried to get this thread off to a poor start. Many lessons and interesting facts can be learned from the War of 1812.

Please excuse yourself now or if you must remain present please refrain from participating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was a cute video.  When my son taught history in the public school he used to bring a guitar to class and have his students sing history songs with him.  There are not that many history songs so he would have his class help write songs about their lesson and they would sing them.  His mentor when he was in college told him that he would never be able to get his class to sing with him but he proved him wrong.  I don't remember him mentioning singing that song but he did have one about the war of 1812 that they did sing.  I'll have to ask him about it, I don't remember the name of the song.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I laughed when I saw you called him a hippy. He would be working right now I'll message him and ask about it.

You said he brought a guitar to class and would sing songs. Naturally this means he's a hippy.

But now you say he's working so I am confused.


:)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Battle of New Orleans

In 1814 we took a little trip along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip.

We took a little bacon and we took a little beans and we fought the bloody British in the town of New Orleans

 

We fired our guns and the British kept a comin' there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago

We fired once more and they commenced a runnin', down the Misssissippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise if we didn't fire our muskets till we looked 'em in the eyes.

We held our fire til we could see their faces well, we opened up our squirrel guns and really gave em' well,

 

We fired our guns and the British kept a comin' there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago

We fired once more and they commenced a runnin', down the Misssissippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

basically you were sticking your nose in our business because we were beating up on France in the Napoleonic wars. 

you mean the France that helped us shuck off the yoke of British Imperialism??? 

 

That sounds like a great reason to declare war

Link to comment
Share on other sites

one of my ancestors, John Doyle was an Irishman and a private sea captain. He was branded a pirate by the Royal Navy for running the blockade during the War of 1812

 

John Doyle eluded the British and sailed south where he dumped his cargo of contraband in the shoals of the Amazon and then picked his way back north to Philadelphia.

 

In Philadelphia, he sold his ship. In one move he went from being a wanted man on the high seas to being an Irishman in downtown Philly with a pocket full of cash

 

It was a brilliant move because back them they couldn't pick a wanted man out of a crowd, they only knew your ship

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kzoo, I am sorry.

It will never happen again.

 

Yes it will.  If I'm doing my job correctly, I will provoke you to action again.

 

Now, why did you want the to come back?  For my good looks or my superior knowledge of the historical period we refer to as the War of 1812?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because I realized how important you are to me. I still question your ability to contribute anything worthwhile but it's lonely without you. Unless Wilbur is talking to me then I really don't need you.

 

Our new friend Wilbur will soon be bacon and fat back.  Don't believe the story of the spider.  He gets the ax.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

one of my ancestors, John Doyle was an Irishman and a private sea captain. He was branded a pirate by the Royal Navy for running the blockade during the War of 1812
 
John Doyle eluded the British and sailed south where he dumped his cargo of contraband in the shoals of the Amazon and then picked his way back north to Philadelphia.
 
In Philadelphia, he sold his ship. In one move he went from being a wanted man on the high seas to being an Irishman in downtown Philly with a pocket full of cash
 
It was a brilliant move because back them they couldn't pick a wanted man out of a crowd, they only knew your ship


I had an Uncle Doyle.

Uncle Doyle was a wino but once was an extra on the TV show Streets of San Francisco.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

John Doyle eluded the British and sailed south where he dumped his cargo of contraband in the shoals of the Amazon and then picked his way back north to Philadelphia.

 

In Philadelphia, he sold his ship. In one move he went from being a wanted man on the high seas to being an Irishman in downtown Philly

 

So he took a step back.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The War of 1812 also led to the writing of the Star Spangled Banner.  Francis Scott Key, a DC lawyer, was hired to get a drunk released from a British ship (probably Nate's relative again).  The drunk was overheard at a Maryland tavern badmouthing the Brits.  He wound up getting arrested and thrown in chains on a ship in Baltimore harbor.   When Francis Scott Key arrived, he learned that the British were going to shell American forces at Fort McHenry.  For that reason he was held on the ship overnight during the bombardment and was not released until the next day.  The Stars and Stripes were still there in the morning and inspired him to write a poem of the experience. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

AirwickWithCheese, on 24 Feb 2015 - 2:46 PM, said:

Nate, serious q.

Where is Uncle Doyle buried and is it on the web?

 

 

Its great great great great grandfather John Doyle

 

and as far as I know there was no internet in the 19th century

 

So there he was in Philly with a pocketful of cash, and so he bought some land. Land right there in the center of Philly.

 

My grandma told me about Uncle Alf. Alf died long before I was born, but the land our old ancestor bought was now tenement houses in Philly, and Uncle Alf was the landlord to a large number of Irish immigrants. Alf was very charitable. He never married and didn't have any kids, but he treated his tenants like they were his family.

 

Grandma tells me about how he was always taking things to people...a bike for a kid in one of his buildings, things like that. One time he invited Grandma and Aunt Gene to Philly when they were in high school. Alf met them at the train station and took them to one of the big department stored downtown. It was Sunday, so the store was closed, but the owner of the store was there to meet them.

 

He opened the store for Grandma and Gene and Alf told him to send him the bill and to let the girls have whatever they wanted.

 

When Alf died, he left the buildings and the land to the people who were his tenants so that each family then owned their own home 

 

and that was the end of the land purchased with the proceeds from the sale of John Doyle's ship

 

all of this I was told by my grandma while she was still alive, so you googly morans can go and suck a ...well, you know what you googly morans can go and suck don't you? ;)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...