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Vietnam 40 years after the fall


petitepedal

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I certainly remember the 70's...graduated in 1976...some of the history shows are like watching the evening news of my youth.

​Same, but at that age, and Canadian, it was just a controversial war in a far off land.  Canada exported a lot of Napalm and Agent Orange and imported a lot of well educated new citizens with limited capability to travel to the US. ;)

 

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My late ex-BIL served two tours. He was Marine special forces; one of those guys who would disappear into the jungle for a couple of weeks at a time and things would mysteriously blow up. He was not right in the head when he came back. Truth be told, he wasn't right in the head before he went...

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My late ex-BIL served two tours. He was Marine special forces; one of those guys who would disappear into the jungle for a couple of weeks at a time and things would mysteriously blow up. He was not right in the head when he came back. Truth be told, he wasn't right in the head before he went...

I knew a few guys that were not right in the head when they came back and most of them were not right in the head when they went in.

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I knew a few guys that were not right in the head when they came back and most of them were not right in the head when they went in.

​I think they were looking for guys like that to do the jobs no 'normal' person would do...

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This is arguably the most famous pic of the fall of Saigon.  A couple interesting things - First, there is a young 4 YO boy on that ladder that I had the opportunity to interview for a job several years ago.  The other thing is that the ladder is here in West Michigan at the GR Ford Presidential Museum.

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Canada exported a lot of Napalm and Agent Orange and imported a lot of well educated new citizens with limited capability to travel to the US. ;)

 

​The town of Nelson, British Columbia and a lot of the smaller villages in that area were popular among American draft dodgers and hippies. Many of them stayed and they've contributed to the region.

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This is arguably the most famous pic of the fall of Saigon.  A couple interesting things - First, there is a young 4 YO boy on that ladder that I had the opportunity to interview for a job several years ago.  The other thing is that the ladder is here in West Michigan at the GR Ford Presidential Museum.

​It is also interesting that many people think of this as the abandonment of the US Consulate when in fact it is the Telephone building in Saigon.  The crowd waiting to board is predominately Vietnamese and those that didn't make this flight waited for the better part of another day for the next flight that never appeared.  The gentleman at the top of the ladder is CIA I believe.  Somewhere I have his name and more information on this picture.  The civilians are probably the dependents of people who worked for the US,  The photographer who took this picture was one of those interviewed on the show petitepedal was watching,

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​It is also interesting that many people think of this as the abandonment of the US Consulate when in fact it is the Telephone building in Saigon.  The crowd waiting to board is predominately Vietnamese and those that didn't make this flight waited for the better part of another day for the next flight that never appeared.  The gentleman at the top of the ladder is CIA I believe.  Somewhere I have his name and more information on this picture.  The civilians are probably the dependents of people who worked for the US,  The photographer who took this picture was one of those interviewed on the show petitepedal was watching,

​I understood him to be CIA as well.  The young fellow I interviewed is on the ladder in the picture.  The folks that didn't make it on a chopper did not live very long after.  They either worked for the US or were Vietmam military families and were quickly rounded up.  

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On the same day this picture was taken a friend of mine who was a pilot in the VNAF stole a plane and flew it to Thailand leaving behind everything he had and his family (not wife, not married) who he never say again.  He's in this country now working as an engineer at a well known defense contractor.  His best friend also stole a plane (not on the same day I believe) dropped some bombs on the South Vietnamese presidents compound and flew north.  He went on to become a prominent figure in Vietnam's civil aviation administration.  People did what they had to do to survive the end,

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​Ditto

​Double ditto

I was just under the wire. Close enough to the end to see how it was going to end. But they were still drafting kids. My number was 13. They did not take any draftees that year. I think it was the first year that they did not draft

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​Double ditto

I was just under the wire. Close enough to the end to see how it was going to end. But they were still drafting kids. My number was 13. They did not take any draftees that year. I think it was the first year that they did not draft

​Was that 71 or 72?

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Graduated in '74. Number in '75

Made me look it up. Wiki:

Draft lotteries were conducted again in 1970 (for those born in 1951) and 1971 to 1975 (for 1952 to 1956 births). The draft numbers issued in 1972 were never used to call for induction into service, because the last call was December 7 and authority to induct expired June 30, 1973. The 1972 to 1975 lottery numbers were used to call some men born 1953 to 1956 for physical exams

 

So looks like I was mostly wrong. Born in '56.

 

 

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Graduated in '74. Number in '75

Made me look it up. Wiki:

Draft lotteries were conducted again in 1970 (for those born in 1951) and 1971 to 1975 (for 1952 to 1956 births). The draft numbers issued in 1972 were never used to call for induction into service, because the last call was December 7 and authority to induct expired June 30, 1973. The 1972 to 1975 lottery numbers were used to call some men born 1953 to 1956 for physical exams

 

So looks like I was mostly wrong. Born in '56.

 

 

​This is the way I remember it.  72 they pulled numbers but no draft.  73 was my year - we still had to register but they didn;t pull numbers.

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