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Wilbur
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I have. When the pain is too great and I want to do a long hell ride it has helped.

It is a pretty common event with GT riders.  I have done it in the past on multi-day rides, especially where a saddle sore may develop.   It can relieve a lot of pain.  Bike fit and hygiene are factors but they are not the only factors. 

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It is a pretty common event with GT riders.  I have done it in the past on multi-day rides, especially where a saddle sore may develop.   It can relieve a lot of pain.  Bike fit and hygiene are factors but they are not the only factors. 

Really? Point me to where you heard this. 

I've never had a saddle sore, but I also use quality bibs and a saddle that fits my ass well. In the humid months a good chamois cream helps too(and proper hygiene of course). 

Maybe I just don't ride enough. :rolleyes:

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Really? Point me to where you heard this. 

I've never had a saddle sore, but I also use quality bibs and a saddle that fits my ass well. In the humid months a good chamois cream helps too(and proper hygiene of course). 

Maybe I just don't ride enough. :rolleyes:

or maybe it is just that you are a perfect asshole?  Common knowledge.  There are two riders right now in the TdF affected.

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Normally I don't to Google homework for others but here is a mention in the first article I viewed.

Double Your Shorts To Double Your Comfort
One great trick for preventing and dealing with saddle soreness is wearing two pairs of cycling shorts (don't laugh; even professional bikers use this trick at times). Not only does adding a second pair of shorts double your padding, it also reduces the friction on the chamois (pad) as well. How? The outside pair of shorts moves with the saddle while the inner pair moves with you.

http://centurycycles.com/tips/general-cycling-tips-tp54/short-shorts-that-are-long-on-comfort-55.htm

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From RBR:

Coach John Hughes Replies: Rob and Mark, it seems that you’re both asking how to prevent pressure sores on the buttocks where the ischial tuberosities, or sitz bones, rest on the saddle, and how to deal with them if they develop. Because your questions were so similar, we thought we’d double up on the answer.

According to Patrick Kortebein, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic, in one study over 70% of saddle discomfort was associated with pain at the sitz bones. This is very similar to bed sores. The principle cause is pressure, which significantly reduces blood flow, depriving the skin of oxygen and nutrients.

The result is pain. Heat exacerbates the problem, because when the body heats up -- both from exercise and ambient temperature -- skin metabolism increases, requiring even more oxygen and nutrients.

Since the problem is pressure, lubricants won’t solve it. Save your money, and focus on the various ways to relieve pressure:

Get a saddle that fits. The width between sitz bones varies from individual to individual. According toAndy Pruitt and the experts at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine, the most important factor is selecting a saddle of the right width for your butt. Many shops have a special device you sit on to measure this distance. Another great resource for understanding saddle  anatomy and how to find a saddle that works for you is Joshua Cohen’s RBR eBook Finding the Perfect Bicycle Seat.

Check your seat height. If your hips are rocking at all as you pedal, your saddle is too high and you’re putting pressure on your sitz bones (and increasing chafing). Pull your jersey up and have someone watch you from the rear to see if the line at the top of your shorts is stable.

Stand frequently. Stand for 30 to 60 seconds every 10-15 minutes to get the blood flowing. This benefits your legs as well as your saddle pressure points.

Use padding appropriately. Too much padding will restrict ease of movement and may lead to chafing problems; however, one study showed that pressure was distributed more evenly with seats that had fluid-filled (LiquiCell) or gel filled (Spenco) surfaces.

If you develop pressure sores, taking time off the bike to let them heal is the best approach. Effective training includes both overload and recovery, and taking time to heal and recover physically and mentally could do you a lot of good. You don’t have to sit still -- go for hikes, play catch with the kids, walk the dog, swim, etc.

If you don’t want to stop riding or are in an important event, try wearing two pair of shorts, with the inner pair turned inside out so the lycra is against your skin. This will provide more padding, and because the shorts are chamois-to-chamois they’ll move as one unit. You can also get a bunion pad with a hole cut out for the bunion and place that so the hole surrounds the pressure sore.

Edited by Wilbur
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or maybe it is just that you are a perfect asshole?  Common knowledge.  There are two riders right now in the TdF affected.

2 out of how many riders?

How many of us put in the miles they do?

If you are getting saddle sores on a regular basis you need to clean your ass more often, or you are using the wrong bibs/saddle. It's just that simple. 

BTW, 2 pairs of padded shorts won't help heal saddle sores, or help with that type of issue. 

 

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Normally I don't to Google homework for others but here is a mention in the first article I viewed.

Double Your Shorts To Double Your Comfort
One great trick for preventing and dealing with saddle soreness is wearing two pairs of cycling shorts (don't laugh; even professional bikers use this trick at times). Not only does adding a second pair of shorts double your padding, it also reduces the friction on the chamois (pad) as well. How? The outside pair of shorts moves with the saddle while the inner pair moves with you.

http://centurycycles.com/tips/general-cycling-tips-tp54/short-shorts-that-are-long-on-comfort-55.htm

what a bunch of bullshit. 

 

You our are an idiot for believing that crap. If you actually rode a bike a little more, you would understand. 

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what a bunch of bullshit. 

 

You our are an idiot for believing that crap. If you actually rode a bike a little more, you would understand. 

Can't argue with the ignorant so once again, you go on the ignore list.  This time it is permanent. Do some research bosox. You keep proving tour stupidity here.  The number of cyclists is irrelevant.  The fact is, the worlds best riders who put in 40 fold your miles that have ideal fits, ideal saddles and excellent bibs have the problem.  It is common.  Even Merckx dropped out of several races with saddle sores.  Then again, you know more than thousands of pros, trainers, coaches and doctors.  Where is my eye roll emoticon?

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Can't argue with the ignorant so once again, you go on the ignore list.  This time it is permanent. Do some research bosox. You keep proving tour stupidity here.  The number of cyclists is irrelevant.  The fact is, the worlds best riders who put in 40 fold your miles that have ideal fits, ideal saddles and excellent bibs have the problem.  It is common.  Even Merckx dropped out of several races with saddle sores.  Then again, you know more than thousands of pros, trainers, coaches and doctors.  Where is my eye roll emoticon?

what GT riders need, and the needs of common folk are different. I guess you aren't intelligent to understand the difference. 

When commoners like us are having saddle sore issues, the best remedy is to take a day or two off. 

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In the last ten years I have had more issues with saddle pain than in previous years. It is my opinion that older skin is a tricky game with cycling.  i think the recent problems i had was due to thinning skin and less natural oils in my skin. 

i have used the double shorts as a last resort, because i was not willing to take a much needed rest.  Doubling up shorts is not something i would do on a normal basis.

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In the last ten years I have had more issues with saddle pain than in previous years. It is my opinion that older skin is a tricky game with cycling.  i think the recent problems i had was due to thinning skin and less natural oils in my skin. 

i have used the double shorts as a last resort, because i was not willing to take a much needed rest.  Doubling up shorts is not something i would do on a normal basis.

Exactly DH.  It isn't a normal thing but if you have to or want to keep tiding through issues, it can help. I have done several multi day rides where training for them culminates simultaneously with a sore issue and the only way through it was to double up.  It works but it isn't comfortable and isn't normal ops.

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 I have done several multi day rides where training for them culminates simultaneously with a sore issue and the only way through it was to double up.  It works but it isn't comfortable and isn't normal ops.

I've never had to train to do a multi-day ride. When you ride 200-300 miles every week of the year, there's no need to "train" for some little multi-day ride. 

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3 years ago I developed an issue with one of my sit bones.  I tried several different saddles including an old standby - I tried several different saddle positions - all to no avail.  After about 12 - 15 miles in the saddle, it hurt.  It only hurt while in the saddle.  When I stood or got off the bike, the pain was gone.  I read a story about a guy riding Paris to Roubaix.  To eliminate the pain caused by the cobbles, he wore an extra pair of shorts just like many of the regulars in his ride.  The light bulb went on for me.  I had a pair of thin padded cycling shorts for use under regular shorts.  I put them on under my cycling shorts and the pain was gone.  It's now the only way I ride pain free.

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Never.

Quality bibs & a proper saddle have always worked for me.

I rode with a gay guy who showed up at my apartment for the ride in just a bibshort, and no jersey.  I demanded he put a jersey on, and gave him an old one of mine.  He was a fairly new rider, and was baffled that a jersey wasn't optional.

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As my rides get longer, saddle sores are the first discomfort to pop up - before tired legs, and before hot spots on the balls of my feet.  Yesterday was as bad as it's ever been - once it gets bad everything else goes south pretty quick.

I had a clunky gel saddle on the old Panasonic that seemed to fit me well.... I'm considering giving that a try.

 

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I rode with a gay guy who showed up at my apartment for the ride in just a bibshort, and no jersey.  I demanded he put a jersey on, and gave him an old one of mine.  He was a fairly new rider, and was baffled that a jersey wasn't optional.

Did he wear red bibs?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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