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Least visited National Parks


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According to the Do it yourself RV website, the least visited National Parks are:  (i hadn't heard of number three until today)

Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument (TX) The flint quarries here provided some of the best sources for stone cutting tools over 13,000 years ago.  Flint was obtained by digging a foot or more below the surface.  The flint bearing dolomite layers are up to eight feet thick.  

 

Bering Land Bridge National Historic Site (AK) Hot springs, lava flows and huge maar lakes look like the terrain on another planet.  The site protects a small relic of a 1,000 mile wide grassy land bridge that is believed to have allowed the passage of people and animals to cross between North America and Asia.  The last Ice Age flooded the area some 10,000 years ago.

 

Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial (PA) Thomas Jefferson once said that Thaddeus Kosciuszko (TK to his friends), was a good shit.  Actually he said, "As pure a son of liberty, as I have ever known..."  TK was a Polish military engineer who became a national hero in both Poland and the United States.  After making his way to America once he heard of the American Revolution, he first served as a volunteer under Benjamin Franklin.  He quickly earned a commission in the Continental army, and was put in charge of the defense of Fort Ticonderoga along the Canadian border.

 

Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Monument (CA) Site of the worst home-front disaster of WWII. On July 17, 1944 two ships, both laden with explosives and berthed next to each other, blew up.  320 servicemen died in the tragedy.

 

Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River (TX) Most visitors to the Rio Grande River visit Big Bend National Park.  No one visits the red-headed step child downstream.

 

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Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial (PA) Thomas Jefferson once said that Thaddeus Kosciuszko (TK to his friends), was a good shit.  Actually he said, "As pure a son of liberty, as I have ever known..."  TK was a Polish military engineer who became a national hero in both Poland and the United States.  After making his way to America once he heard of the American Revolution, he first served as a volunteer under Benjamin Franklin.  He quickly earned a commission in the Continental army, and was put in charge of the defense of Fort Ticonderoga along the Canadian border.

Yay!  One of our own makes good!  I knew he was all aboot more than just hot mustard!

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