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Wish me Luck


Parr8hed
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Unless money is the reason you are leaving never stay for more money. I made that mistake.

Prolly shouldn't stay anyways. It changes the dynamic: You wonder why they waited until you had a better offer to give you more money; they resent having to pay you the money & wonder if, since you are a mercenary, you'll jump at the next company that offers more money.

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Best of luck!

If I may offer some hard practical thoughts - While your boss may be ok with you leaving, those above him may not be and may decide to give you an early 'vacation'.

Copy over any files you've created, contact lists, or other useful information onto a USB drive in the next day or so. Copy over any emails relating to your nursing license, or to incidents where your judgment was questioned, or where questions of policy arose.  You won't have access to them after you leave if questions arise later.

Clean out your desk of any personal items you don't want left behind, or items you don't want to take the risk of having someone clean out and sort for you.

Inventory company property like phones, chargers, pagers (some people still use them), and keys - any company property issued to you, so you can show you returned it.

99% of the time nothing immediate comes of turning in a resignation letter, but I've seen people escorted right out the door without the chance to go back to the desks and/or getting locked out of their computers within the hour of handing the paper in.

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"some hard practical thoughts"

Bear of a situation you're describing there, TK. 

One place I worked the company laid off about 50 people out of about 400 in one day.  HR processed them like an abattoir.  For some reason my boss told me to 'stand by' in the hallway outside the conference room where people were told the bad news, in case somebody went ballistic.  Never figured out why he picked me, except maybe he thought I was the most expendable of his staff.

Anyway, it was then my job to escort the people to their manager's office if the manager didn't show up when HR was through.  Their manager allowed the employee to go to their desk and pick up personal items such as a purse, hat, coat, and lunch box - basically anything they walked in with that morning.  Their computer access was frozen.  Their manager cleared out their desks and sent home anything he judged 'personal'.

It made for a very long day.  I saw good people leave that place broken down in tears.  You could smell the fear in that place for a while after that.

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Best of luck!

If I may offer some hard practical thoughts - While your boss may be ok with you leaving, those above him may not be and may decide to give you an early 'vacation'.

Copy over any files you've created, contact lists, or other useful information onto a USB drive in the next day or so. Copy over any emails relating to your nursing license, or to incidents where your judgment was questioned, or where questions of policy arose.  You won't have access to them after you leave if questions arise later.

Clean out your desk of any personal items you don't want left behind, or items you don't want to take the risk of having someone clean out and sort for you.

Inventory company property like phones, chargers, pagers (some people still use them), and keys - any company property issued to you, so you can show you returned it.

99% of the time nothing immediate comes of turning in a resignation letter, but I've seen people escorted right out the door without the chance to go back to the desks and/or getting locked out of their computers within the hour of handing the paper in.

Wow man. That's intense.  This is a small company.  I am pretty well thought of and pretty close with my boss and his boss (CEO) and our medical director.  I feel like I am probably good.  People don't have issues like that here really.  But I appreciate the concern.

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"some hard practical thoughts"

Bear of a situation you're describing there, TK. 

Sue, I worked supporting financial institutions for a couple of years.  Policy was the second you resigned, or the second it looked like your resignation was imminent, to have someone escort you to your desk to grab your personal things, and then escort you out the door.  It was considered compliance.  From what I heard, when I left, I was one of the last people to get handshakes from all of my supervisors, and a "We get it, but we're sorry to see you go."  A lot of others got shorter shrift.

I know a lot of good people who were "good people" until they left, and then had one or two middle managers badmouth them when they were gone.  Those people were good employees -those middle managers were both sour grapes, and couldn't see why ANY employee they would abus*cough*, that is, supervise, would want to leave.  One of those particular middle managers wouldn't have survived in another world (having been Peter-principled) and we all knew it.

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Sue, I worked supporting financial institutions for a couple of years.  Policy was the second you resigned, or the second it looked like your resignation was imminent, to have someone escort you to your desk to grab your personal things, and then escort you out the door.  It was considered compliance.  From what I heard, when I left, I was one of the last people to get handshakes from all of my supervisors, and a "We get it, but we're sorry to see you go."  A lot of others got shorter shrift.

I know a lot of good people who were "good people" until they left, and then had one or two middle managers badmouth them when they were gone.  Those people were good employees -those middle managers were both sour grapes, and couldn't see why ANY employee they would abus*cough*, that is, supervise, would want to leave.  One of those particular middle managers wouldn't have survived in another world (having been Peter-principled) and we all knew it.

That really sucks to hear.  We have had plenty of coordinators leave, almost all of them on good circumstances.  There has never been anything like you describe.  Even the 2 dudes that I can remember that were asked to leave were treated well and everyone got along fine.  Again, very small company, very close knit.  I look for there to be lots of hugs and thank yous.  Someone may even touch my butt.

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