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I'll get back to it, later.


tybeegb
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I'm working on the ceiling in one of the bedrooms.  For weeks now I've been "planning" how I'm going to get the ceiling back to level after some of the joists were cut and replaced with treated lumber (for the upstairs patio) that is almost a half inch below the original joists.  I would walk in and look at it, ponder for a little while, then think of something else I could do besides that, like drink.  I'll get back to it, later.  I finally decided upon the best solution, and started working on it this morning.  I'm almost finished step one, but step two will have to wait until later.  I'll get back to it.  One of the perks of retirement.  Procrastination is a great stress reliever when you can always put off tomorrow what you can put off today.

Here's what I'm dealing with.  I'm lowering the entire ceiling with furring strips along the joists, after installing another 2 x 10 joist where the new joists attach to the old joist.  It will be 1/2 lower, but still well within code.  I'll get around to ordering the tongue and groove boards, later.  :whistle:

 IMAG0219_(640x362).thumb.jpg.3b0348026ee 

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It took you weeks to come up with 1/2" furring strips?

You maybe the king of procrastination.  Taking weeks to come up with the obvious answer most would've been at before they ever put in the new joist, that is an impressive level of procrastination (or you are complete idiot, but don't think that is the case).

Now go have a couple beers to celebrate your hard work in coming up with a solution.

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Now go have a couple beers to celebrate your hard work in coming up with putting off a solution for another day.

You are an inspiration to procrastinators everywhere.  When I retire again and am faced with a difficult decision I now have the perfect answer to: WWTD?

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It took you weeks to come up with 1/2" furring strips?

You maybe the king of procrastination.  Taking weeks to come up with the obvious answer most would've been at before they ever put in the new joist, that is an impressive level of procrastination (or you are complete idiot, but don't think that is the case).

Now go have a couple beers to celebrate your hard work in coming up with a solution.

Actually, I was zeroed on that one area where the new joists are low.  From running a straight edge back to level, then trimming it, to furring just the one joist.  Problem with that was the joist hangers.  To get them out would have really torn up the joists; even cutting them and prying them out would be destructive.  I really did not want to lower the ceiling, at all, but that's what turned out to be the best option.  It's still not perfectly level, but I can work with it, later.     

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Actually, I was zeroed on that one area where the new joists are low.  From running a straight edge back to level, then trimming it, to furring just the one joist.  Problem with that was the joist hangers.  To get them out would have really torn up the joists; even cutting them and prying them out would be destructive.  I really did not want to lower the ceiling, at all, but that's what turned out to be the best option.  It's still not perfectly level, but I can work with it, later.     

They way I learned to do joist hangers when I did construction was you used a wood chisel and carved out a notch for the joist hanger to sit in so the bottom of the joist hanger was either flush or slightly inset from the joist.  Seems that is one of those tricks either a lot of people don't know or don't take the time to do, but makes life easier later if you do it.

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They way I learned to do joist hangers when I did construction was you used a wood chisel and carved out a notch for the joist hanger to sit in so the bottom of the joist hanger was either flush or slightly inset from the joist.  Seems that is one of those tricks either a lot of people don't know or don't take the time to do, but makes life easier later if you do it.

Not really needed.  You would almost never adhere anything directly to the bottom of the joists.  On an  exterior deck there usually isn't anything below.  On inside framing you should never attach drywall directly to the joists, you should always install strapping to the joists first and in doing that you can easily go around the hangers.

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Not really needed.  You would almost never adhere anything directly to the bottom of the joists.  On an  exterior deck there usually isn't anything below.  On inside framing you should never attach drywall directly to the joists, you should always install strapping to the joists first and in doing that you can easily go around the hangers.

Never seen anyone do drywall any other way than connected directly to the joists.

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It took you weeks to come up with 1/2" furring strips?

You maybe the king of procrastination.  Taking weeks to come up with the obvious answer most would've been at before they ever put in the new joist, that is an impressive level of procrastination (or you are complete idiot, but don't think that is the case).

Now go have a couple beers to celebrate your hard work in coming up with a solution.

See, now *there's* the snarky ol' Indy I remember.  I had wondered where he'd gone off to, and then said to myself...

"Wait.  He had a kid."  ;)

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By strapping are you referring to the x-braces ?

The strapping replaces the old x-braces.  It's like 20 gauge hardened steel and most all builders sheet right over it.  Just don't try to drive a DW screw threw it.  As for joist hangers - just sheet over them.  They're in the corner.

Edited by Kzoo
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  I'm lowering the entire ceiling with furring strips along the joists, after installing another 2 x 10 joist where the new joists attach to the old joist.  It will be 1/2 lower, but still well within code.  I'll get around to ordering the tongue and groove boards, later. 

:whistle:

 IMAG0219_(640x362).thumb.jpg.3b0348026ee 

No no no no no!

You need to put some oversized footings underneath the new joists and put posts up from the footings to support the new joists.  Then you need to lower the rest of the house by 1/2 an inch.  Of course, the old joists will follow and will line up perfectly with the new ones.  Problem solved.

Oh, and you need to get a permit for this work.

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