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I am disenchanted by the entitled


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There are all sorts of meaning to 'entitled'.

 

I get frustrated by all the entitlement programs that hand out 'free' stuff based on income.

 

Like the programs to get free windows and doors, free home weatherizing, free energy efficient appliances.  'Oh no, sir, we're sorry, but your income level is too high.  You can't qualify.'

 

Free healthcare? 'Oh no, sir, we're sorry, but your income level is too high.  You can't qualify.'

 

Free rent? 'Oh no, sir, we're sorry, but your income level is too high.  You can't qualify.'

 

Free food?  'Oh no, sir, we're sorry, but your income level is too high.  You can't qualify.'

 

College scholarships for my children, who were scholastically either 1 or 2 in their classes?  'Oh no, sir, we're sorry, but your income level is too high.  You can't qualify. But we've given you an "aid" package where you can take out parent loans.'

 

Would I feel better about it if I could qualify?  No, not really, because I believe in working hard to make and to earn my own way to the extent my talents and abilities permit.  And so, you ask, "What's your complaint, then?

 

It seems to me that the criteria for accessing many entitlement programs are arbitrary.  Perhaps because I don't know how they were developed, but they seem arbitrary all the same.  It also seems to me that many of the programs have progressed beyond meeting a need to supplying advanced levels of comfort.

 

And it seems to me that many programs produce a level of dependency in people, taking away their interest and drive in improving themselves, improving conditions for their families, and in their making contributions to their communities.

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My husband had stellar grades during his years in nursing school.  His applications for scholarships were all ignored.  I think it was due to the income part of the application.  We don't have much, but we have saved for years and worked hard.  I wasn't willing to sell our second home, or dip into our retirement egg.

 

Maybe, we didn't deserve any help.  We got him through school and didn't take loans.  Believe me, I was temped, until I saw it was 6.99% interest and it tallies from Day 1 of the loan.  I was afraid of the hole that would have been dug for us.

 

So, we ate beans and rice for four years, and really tightened our belts.   

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My husband had stellar grades during his years in nursing school.  His applications for scholarships were all ignored.  I think it was due to the income part of the application.  We don't have much, but we have saved for years and worked hard.  I wasn't willing to sell our second home, or dip into our retirement egg.

 

Maybe, we didn't deserve any help.  We got him through school and didn't take loans.  Believe me, I was temped, until I saw it was 6.99% interest and it tallies from Day 1 of the loan.  I was afraid of the hole that would have been dug for us.

 

So, we ate beans and rice for four years, and really tightened our belts.   

Most excellent.  That is what's missing in today's youth; the sense of self supportiveness and sacrifice.  :2:

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