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By the dawn's cold light


maddmaxx

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I see that my power line is down between my house and the street.  It's still hooked up but it's laying on the ground as the "gooseneck" that ran up the eaves of my roof has ripped away from the house and broken the conduit that goes into my power meter.  There is a small branch keeping the wires out of the street as the pole is about 140 feet away on the other side of the road.  At this end, the line complete with it's heavy supporting wire cable is draped over my phone and internet lines.  When they get pulled down you will hear no more of me.  It's been reported to the power company and they will get here "when possible" as they are busy across the state with downed lines and power outages.

I hope this is entirely their problem and not something I have to hire an electrician to handle.

 

Are you sure you want to own a house dots?

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Responsibility depends on your utility' rules.  Some utilities take responsibility for the overhead wire from the pole to your house, others make the homeowner responsible.  Sorry to say, it's pretty likely the broken conduit on the side of your house is most likely your cost, as in my experience the wiring from the point of attachment at the eave and then down to the meter typically belongs to the homeowner. 

If the conduit snapped off the house, the meter housing or 'can' may be damaged.  Most often the homeowner has to buy that.  The meter itself belongs to the utility.

Sometimes the utility linemen will make some repairs even though it's the homeowner's equipment, depending on how much time they have and how much damage there is.  Again, sorry to say, sometimes if the damage is extensive they just disconnect the service until repairs are made.  Not good news, but thought you might want to consider your options if the worst case came about.

On the brighter side, if you need to hire an electrician to replace the conduit that's broken, ask him if you can just use 'service entrance conductor' down the side of the house to the meter instead of conduit.  It might be cheaper to run the cable from the weatherhead (attachment point) down to the meter using service entrance conductor instead of conduit and wire. 

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The stove is lit in the sun room to bring it up to temp as it can keep the house liveable.

I'm going to push for them to repair it as it was their "basket" that broke and the weight of their wire that pulled the wire off the side of my house.  I may not get much sympathy though as you say.  So many people in CT stayed without power during the big storms of a couple of years ago because wires were pulled off their homes and they had to wait for electricians to do what the power company wouldn't.

We shall see what we shall see.  Life is an adventure.

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where I live, the power company will fix it, but you pay a repair bill for stuff from the pole to the house. The power company sells really cheap insurance coverage for that, too. I don't worry about it because the pole is right next to the house and my house is right up by the road. My neighbor's house is back a couple hundred yards from the road, so that is the sort of set up that the insurance is made for.

all in all, I think its easier to cope with no electricity in the winter

now, I lose my well when I lose electricity, too, so its basically like camping, just with a much better tent

so if you are on public water and have a fireplace or wood stove, you have nothing to worry about

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10 minutes ago, Nate said:

where I live, the power company will fix it, but you pay a repair bill for stuff from the pole to the house. The power company sells really cheap insurance coverage for that, too. I don't worry about it because the pole is right next to the house and my house is right up by the road. My neighbor's house is back a couple hundred yards from the road, so that is the sort of set up that the insurance is made for.

all in all, I think its easier to cope with no electricity in the winter

now, I lose my well when I lose electricity, too, so its basically like camping, just with a much better tent

so if you are on public water and have a fireplace or wood stove, you have nothing to worry about

I have electric heat, a well and septic.  When the power goes I got nuttin.   :humping:  This is real country, not Nate country with public sewers and water.

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52 minutes ago, Thaddeus Kosciuszko said:

Responsibility depends on your utility' rules.  Some utilities take responsibility for the overhead wire from the pole to your house, others make the homeowner responsible.  Sorry to say, it's pretty likely the broken conduit on the side of your house is most likely your cost, as in my experience the wiring from the point of attachment at the eave and then down to the meter typically belongs to the homeowner. 

If the conduit snapped off the house, the meter housing or 'can' may be damaged.  Most often the homeowner has to buy that.  The meter itself belongs to the utility.

Sometimes the utility linemen will make some repairs even though it's the homeowner's equipment, depending on how much time they have and how much damage there is.  Again, sorry to say, sometimes if the damage is extensive they just disconnect the service until repairs are made.  Not good news, but thought you might want to consider your options if the worst case came about.

On the brighter side, if you need to hire an electrician to replace the conduit that's broken, ask him if you can just use 'service entrance conductor' down the side of the house to the meter instead of conduit.  It might be cheaper to run the cable from the weatherhead (attachment point) down to the meter using service entrance conductor instead of conduit and wire. 

BLAH, blah, BLAH, blah, blah, blah

Electrical%20-%20hose%20clamped%20ground

 

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32 minutes ago, Nate said:

please, Max...you live in the suburbs of NYC

You're about as country as Jon Bon Jovi

:lol:

 

When you look at a night time photo of the east coast, look for the black place between NYC and Boston.  They are about 100 miles in either direction.  This is the farm belt of eastern CT.

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30 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

:lol:

 

When you look at a night time photo of the east coast, look for the black place between NYC and Boston.  They are about 100 miles in either direction.  This is the farm belt of eastern CT.

really? you are so far out in the country I need to consult NASA satellite images?

I guess I'll have to take a ride over to our Federal Building....

flagBarn.jpg

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When we lose power here (which is often in hurricane season), the power company makes repairs in order of relative importance.  They fix the biggest problems in the area first (those affecting the most people) and problems affecting single customers are repaired last.  So if your problem IS their problem, you may have to wait awhile before they get to you.  

BTW, in my area, I believe they are responsible for everything up to the power meter, which they also own.  I know that they came out and replaced the cable on my house that runs down the eave and goes into the meter several years ago.

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10 minutes ago, Road Runner said:

When we lose power here (which is often in hurricane season), the power company makes repairs in order of relative importance.  They fix the biggest problems in the area first (those affecting the most people) and problems affecting single customers are repaired last.  So if your problem IS their problem, you may have to wait awhile before they get to you.  

BTW, in my area, I believe they are responsible for everything up to the power meter, which they also own.  I know that they came out and replaced the cable on my house that runs down the eave and goes into the meter several years ago.

That's what I'm hoping for. As others have said however that's not the case everywhere.

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2 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

The stove is lit in the sun room to bring it up to temp as it can keep the house liveable.

I'm going to push for them to repair it as it was their "basket" that broke and the weight of their wire that pulled the wire off the side of my house.  I may not get much sympathy though as you say.  So many people in CT stayed without power during the big storms of a couple of years ago because wires were pulled off their homes and they had to wait for electricians to do what the power company wouldn't.

We shall see what we shall see.  Life is an adventure.

Our power cut on & off during our "storm" on Sunday.  Very unusual for Southern CA.  My son was funny as he's never gone through a power outage.  Uh I have to go, will the toilet flush?  Yes, not electrical.  Then he goes into the kitchen and goes to warm up a snack in the microwave.  Uh dude the microwave needs electricity. Dammit!!!  Just chill, the power will come on shortly...  We were down for maybe 15 minutes at the longest outing but it went out about 5 times which was a PITA as every time we'd fix the clocks it would go out again... 

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I've had service installed at several new houses.  Here you are responsible up to and including the gooseneck.  The power company owns the meter and meter box and provides it for you.  Here you are responsible for everything up to the top of the pole.  If the service is underground the rules change just a bit.  If the service pole is ripped off the wall and the conduit is broken at the meter box, here you would need it inspected before the power company reconnected their lines.  Here they would pill the fuse at the transformer and disconnect their lines at your service pole and wait for the inspector to call them.

Hope you reach a good and quick resolution Maxx

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Well, after much advice and some research on the situation I did what I wish I'd done this morning.  I hired an electrician to come out and look at it and to start the repairs on the goose neck and the attach point for where the suspension cable for the power line goes (like a basket but not quite the same in this case.  The power company still hasn't showed up and at this point I almost wish they wouldn't as they will probably shut off the power.

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Yea.  The first part is done for free.  The power company came and reattached the power wires to my house.  His advice was that my electrician might just want to reattach the weather head and seal the break in the sleeve.  Else a new sleeve will have to be run, probably in better weather.  No damage to my house wires, just the plastic sleeve.

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6 hours ago, Longjohn said:

There, I fixed it. :nodhead:

Unfortunately the water came down the sleeve from the weather head......and may have done so before.  The 1970 breaker breaker box is going to cost me a new 200 amp service and several changes to come up to code.  The weather head has to be relocated by code.  The breaker box has to be relocated by code.  Blah blah blah blah.

This is looking like the new well of 2 years ago.

so Dots, still want to own a house.

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6 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Unfortunately the water came down the sleeve from the weather head......and may have done so before.  The 1970 breaker breaker box is going to cost me a new 200 amp service and several changes to come up to code.  The weather head has to be relocated by code.  The breaker box has to be relocated by code.  Blah blah blah blah.

This is looking like the new well of 2 years ago.

so Dots, still want to own a house.

Sniff, sniff, sniff, is that smoke I smell?

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