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I Might Be Up The Creek Without A Paddle


Thaddeus Kosciuszko
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56 minutes ago, F_in Ray Of Sunshine said:

That’s nice and all, but how relevant is 1920’s electricity today?

A fair point, as the electrical equipment featured in the book would be antiquated.  The civil engineering principles for selecting sites, calculating available energies based upon flows, millraces and tailraces would still apply today.  Likewise the electrical engineering principles would be similar from then to now, only with the application of modern equipment - i.e. using a centrifugal pump, a squirrel cage motor, and capacitors instead of a DC generator.  Although, there's something to be said for the durability of the older relay control systems where you could repair components instead of using throw-away electronics modules that have no place to re-inject the factory smoke once it escapes the module.

The historical aspect of the systems I find interesting.  The equipment discussed in books like these is becoming more rare; some to the point where people don't even know what the devices were originally.

I suppose it might be similar to a book about how to adapt a Model T into an ice cutting machine or sawmill.  Not many Model T's lying about anymore, but the book would still be interesting if one could apply a modern engine.

Once I get through it, if you're interested I'll loan it to you.

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1 minute ago, Thaddeus Kosciuszko said:

A fair point, as the electrical equipment featured in the book would be antiquated.  The civil engineering principles for selecting sites, calculating available energies based upon flows, millraces and tailraces would still apply today.  Likewise the electrical engineering principles would be similar from then to now, only with the application of modern equipment - i.e. using a centrifugal pump, a squirrel cage motor, and capacitors instead of a DC generator.  Although, there's something to be said for the durability of the older relay control systems where you could repair components instead of using throw-away electronics modules that have no place to re-inject the factory smoke once it escapes the module.

The historical aspect of the systems I find interesting.  The equipment discussed in books like these is becoming more rare; some to the point where people don't even know what the devices were originally.

I suppose it might be similar to a book about how to adapt a Model T into an ice cutting machine or sawmill.  Not many Model T's lying about anymore, but the book would still be interesting if one could apply a modern engine.

Once I get through it, if you're interested I'll loan it to you.

.....this kills the joke.....

<sigh> nerds.....

  • Haha 1
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