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Not what you want to see from seat 15J


maddmaxx
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Air France had an emergency landing at a small field in Canada this weekend.  This is what the passengers saw

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No Fan

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A "spot of damage" to the pylon

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And this is what they should have seen

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This is about as bad as it gets in the jet engine business.  Scary stuff.  There's been a lot of this crap going on lately.

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It is considered a cardinal sin in the jet engine business to allow parts to exit out of a broken engine in any direction but aft.  Having a fan hub depart from the inner shaft with the associated spinning 10+ ft diameter fan is really bad.  

An event like that is relying a lot more on luck than safety.

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1 minute ago, maddmaxx said:

It is considered a cardinal sin in the jet engine business to allow parts to exit out of a broken engine in any direction but aft.  Having a fan hub depart from the inner shaft with the associated spinning 10+ ft diameter fan is really bad.  

An event like that is relying a lot more on luck than safety.

The flight in Australia sent parts through the left wing. The jet flew just fine.  Everyone still survived.

While a rational person might agree with you, my namesake has an image to uphold.

DK

 

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1 hour ago, Dunning Kruger said:

The flight in Australia sent parts through the left wing. The jet flew just fine.  Everyone still survived.

While a rational person might agree with you, my namesake has an image to uphold.

DK

 

:dontknow:  Non seatbelt wearing people sometimes get thrown from the wreck and survive too.

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7 hours ago, Zealot said:

Ouch. What caused it?

The initial report was "probably a cracked fan blade causing a failed blade.  That can create all sorts of trouble from a failed hub or shaft due to unbalanced stress or a fan case so badly damaged that the engine swallows most of it killing the rest of the fan and hub and shaft on the way.  Notice that there is nothing left in front of the compressor section.  That's a lot of fast moving parts that got out of the engine.  Thankfully no insurmountable structural damage or parts flying through the sections occupied by flesh and blood.

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I hope to all that is good and just that WoScrapr does not see this. We are debating going back to Paris early next year. She is already spooked about terrorism. Air France is one of the lower costs flights I am tracking :angry:

 

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3 minutes ago, Scrapr said:

I hope to all that is good and just that WoScrapr does not see this. We are debating going back to Paris early next year. She is already spooked about terrorism. Air France is one of the lower costs flights I am tracking :angry:

 

Try Wow airlines.  Don’t know how difficult that is but it is a well run low cost carrier based in Iceland.  All flights connect in Keflavik but their pricing is pretty darn good. 

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2 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

The initial report was "probably a cracked fan blade causing a failed blade.  That can create all sorts of trouble from a failed hub or shaft due to unbalanced stress or a fan case so badly damaged that the engine swallows most of it killing the rest of the fan and hub and shaft on the way.  Notice that there is nothing left in front of the compressor section.  That's a lot of fast moving parts that got out of the engine.  Thankfully no insurmountable structural damage or parts flying through the sections occupied by flesh and blood.

Looks like the containment ring did it’s job before it left.  

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It's the ethanol.  They forgot to put the stabilizer in with the last fill-up.  :whistle:  Then again if could have been the TIT was running just a little high and they weren't watching the fuel flow? 

Wilbur, do they put foam in the fuel tanks on those things?

 

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6 minutes ago, tybeegb said:

It's the ethanol.  They forgot to put the stabilizer in with the last fill-up.  :whistle:  Then again if could have been the TIT was running just a little high and they weren't watching the fuel flow? 

Wilbur, do they put foam in the fuel tanks on those things?

 

No foam.  

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2 hours ago, Wilbur said:

Try Wow airlines.  Don’t know how difficult that is but it is a well run low cost carrier based in Iceland.  All flights connect in Keflavik but their pricing is pretty darn good. 

Yea.  And they make sure their fan blades are defective.  Unlike their French counterparts.

DK

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15 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

The initial report was "probably a cracked fan blade causing a failed blade.  That can create all sorts of trouble from a failed hub or shaft due to unbalanced stress or a fan case so badly damaged that the engine swallows most of it killing the rest of the fan and hub and shaft on the way.  Notice that there is nothing left in front of the compressor section.  That's a lot of fast moving parts that got out of the engine.  Thankfully no insurmountable structural damage or parts flying through the sections occupied by flesh and blood.

I've seen, and repaired the damage caused by failure in high velocity fans (hvac and evac systems). Can't imagine how truly fortunate those on that plane were!

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27 minutes ago, Zealot said:

I've seen, and repaired the damage caused by failure in high velocity fans (hvac and evac systems). Can't imagine how truly fortunate those on that plane were!

Wilbur was correct.  There is a containment ring built into the intake of the engine around the fan.  It's gone but it must have absorbed most of the energy released

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54 minutes ago, Thaddeus Kosciuszko said:

That must have been a rather substantial drag!  It must have take the pilots quite a bit of work to get the plane to fly straight after that happened

 

especially since they couldn't feather the prop.

Not as much as you would think.  

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