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Showing my ignorance


SuzieQ

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Are they tubeless tires or regular tires with a tube inside?  Are you planning to put some sort of special air in the tires?  

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I would go to the middle of the recommended pressure range and then adjust from there.  Lighter riders usually need less air pressure.

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I like to listen to Johnny Cash when I pump up my tires, but you can pump your tires up to whatever you like, really

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Are they tubeless tires or regular tires with a tube inside?  Are you planning to put some sort of special air in the tires?  

regular tube tires.  I'm putting autumn air in silly!

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If you will post a picture of the side of the tire where it tells you the inflation range, we can tell you how much air to put in.

it doesn't say, just gives the size

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I like to listen to Johnny Cash when I pump up my tires, but you can pump your tires up to whatever you like, really

That Old Wheel or That's Enough?

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I'm assuming you weigh in the 100-120lb range, so probably 20 psi front, 24 psi rear would be a good starting point.  If they feel bouncy, let some out, if they feel too squirmy and or you are bottoming out, add a little more.

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Well I couldn't wait any longer and went for my rides :)  I guestimated 40 and just checked the tire now with a flash light..... and it says 30 - 50.  I weight about 123.  Had such an amazing day on the bike!! first with dogs, then no dogs

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It really depends on the trail you are riding.  On a MTB tire it's usually 65 lbs max.  Most of the trails I run are hard and fast so and I typically run mine at 60psi, probably about the only guy too, but that's what I like.  I also run one heck of a stiff front fork.

 

Generally, if you aren't sure, start out around 40 and adjust from there, which generally means letting out air.

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You've tried 40, try 20 next time and see how that feels.  Then you have two experiences to compare and adjust from there.  If it's rooty and/or rocky you'll know if you're to low b/c you'll feel the rim hitting rocks.  Not a big deal, may pinch flat, but you'll know for sure what's to low, or that you didn't unload enough over whatever you hit ;)

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You've tried 40, try 20 next time and see how that feels.  Then you have two experiences to compare and adjust from there.  If it's rooty and/or rocky you'll know if you're to low b/c you'll feel the rim hitting rocks.  Not a big deal, may pinch flat, but you'll know for sure what's to low, or that you didn't unload enough over whatever you hit ;)

 

Run out of tubes and patches 10 miles from the trail head, then ask if it's a big deal.

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Run out of tubes and patches 10 miles from the trail head, then ask if it's a big deal.

A big deal that probably won't happen again.  If it's rocky/rooty or 20 is to mentally skittish try 25.  Have fun, pressure is fun to play with :)

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A big deal that probably won't happen again.  If it's rocky/rooty or 20 is to mentally skittish try 25.  Have fun, pressure is fun to play with :)

 

I'm just a pump it up in ride, been doing it for a couple decades now and really hasn't bothered me.  Honestly, I think people over think this stuff and makes it far more complicated than it needs to be.  Is there times lower pressure me help you, yes, but there's also times where higher pressure helps you and trails (at least the funnier ones) have different things, so who cares about pressure, go ride and have fun.

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The only thing I have left to add is that, IMO, there's a huge benefit in traction when running the lowest possible pressure, meaning the pressure that just barely avoids pinch flats.  In my experience, with my pump's gauge, when I weighed 225 and riding my 26er with tubes, that was about 30 front/ 34 rear.  Now that I weigh 175 and riding a 29er tubeless, it's about 20/22 (though my pumps gauge seems to read a little lower than others).

 

Call it over thinking to try to find the ideal pressure, but IMO, it's no different than a proper fitting, the right saddle, etc.  All seem like minor things, but to the enthusiast, they make all the difference in the world for your riding experience.

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