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THIS is a knife!


Philander Seabury
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I have to get my knives sharpened. 

I learned how to hold a knife (abit smaller than above) when I was a teenager, to shave a ginger root skin by holding the ginger root..in the air, not necessarily on the cutting board.  My mother ensured the knife was slightly dull so it was safer for me to learn how to slice meat...against its grain, finer veggie cutting....Chinese cooking involves a lot more cutting of ingredients, paring the skin.  We actually didn't use a paring knife until I was in  my late teens.  It's just habit that's all.  

My parents chose not to buy a cleaver which is a more traditional Asian kitchen cutting tool.  I'm not sure why...  They were of course, made sure one of them was around, whenever we used kitchen knife for cutting harder food/meat.  I came from a very safety conscious family. My father was a restaurant cook...very aware.  Though we were poor, they understood and bought a Henkel's knife which lasted for years.

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7 minutes ago, RalphWaldoMooseworth said:

Yup!  For scale.  Also, for colonoscopy prep.  Can't have red, orange, or purple dye, and Jello is one of the few things you can eat, so green (yellow and blue dye) it is!

I hope the knife isn't part of the colonoscopy prep.   ?

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4 minutes ago, jsharr said:

I love knives.  A big razor sharp chopper like yours is my go to.  A dull knife is dangerous.  

I used to shudder when halving spaghetti squashes until I saw on the tv or internet that you should start the knife, then bang the squash down to force the knife though.  That way feels much mo better than trying to push it through that rock hard squash because the fingers are far far away.

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3 minutes ago, RalphWaldoMooseworth said:

I used to shudder when halving spaghetti squashes until I saw on the tv or internet that you should start the knife, then bang the squash down to force the knife though.  That way feels much mo better than trying to push it through that rock hard squash because the fingers are far far away.

Once you put a grove on the top of the squash try sticking the point in and twisting.  Pop.......all done.  Don't use a small knife though..........pop, all done.

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2 hours ago, Road Runner said:

This is a great thread, anyway you slice it. 

Some cutting edge information here.

You guys are pretty sharp.

I think Ralph has a good handle on how to deal with unruly squash.

Excellent post.  You cut right to the heart of the matter.  

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17 hours ago, RalphWaldoMooseworth said:

This thing always terrifies me!  Used to halve a spaghetti squash. 

IMG_1024.JPG

My brother-in-law gave me a big, thick chef's knife similar to the one in the picture.  He likes to sharpen his knives to the point where they can split hairs, so I had to be so careful with it and eventually I ran the blade across the surface of a sharpening stone to dull it!  I like my knives barely sharp enough to do the job!

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4 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

My brother-in-law gave me a big, thick chef's knife similar to the one in the picture.  He likes to sharpen his knives to the point where they can split hairs, so I had to be so careful with it and eventually I ran the blade across the surface of a sharpening stone to dull it!  I like my knives barely sharp enough to do the job!

A dull knife is dangerous.  You have to work harder, use more force to make the cut, increasing the likelihood of an accident.  Secondly, a dull blade tears instead of cuts, leaving a jagged edge.  This may not be important on an onion, but on your hand it is.  Rough edged cuts lead to tissue death and scarring.  Sharp knives leave a clean cut that is easier to close, has less tissue death and heals cleaner and faster.

 

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