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OK DIYers, need a little hep.


2Far
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As part of the reno, we took the bar top off the half wall between the kitchen & living space. Wo2 didn't want bar top intruding into the living room any more.

While it's off, she decided that she wants the new (butcher block) top to be one 2x4 higher all the way around. No probs.

How do I fill in the gap between where the old dry wall stops & the top of the new 2x4, a gap of about 1&3/4"?

On the kitchen side, the seam will be covered up by ship lap. On the living room side, it'll be covered up by a molding.

I'm thinking cut long strips of wall board & glue them to the new 2x4.

Any other ideas?

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2 minutes ago, Road Runner said:

Something like this.  Add spackling as required, of course.

I would use a reinforced mud mix and possibly some L bead or tear away bead, but need to see the area really.  Seems like a clean edge is needed.  Unless what is being asked is what to fill the gap with prior to covering with ship lap or molding.

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image.png.9e8fdae0e8a087ca020c55c6d02ee823.png

So if I understand this, you are going to cap this with a 2x4 laying on its side to increase the height?  Coud you use a 2x6 ripped to the correct width of the current wall studs and sheet rock?

Then you would have no need for filler.  This would be fine if you are covering with a hard material like molding or ship lap, however is you plan to use mud and texture it, I would use sheet rock filler strips.

 

 

 

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This project is reaching the point that is beyond my ken.

We tried getting a quote from a couple of reliable contractors, but they are so busy no one want this little job.

Wo2 watches all those decorating, flipping, rehab shows and thinks we (I) can do it. She want to just cap the long straight away (maybe 6" total for a little overhang), but have bar top width (~16") on the 45 and short section toward the dining room. That's one 45 miter and one "who knows?" miter.

I can get butcher block grade counter from Lowes/HD but I'm thinking I'll need a table saw fersure, prolly a biscuit joiner and figure out some way to secure the cap portion to the new 2x4.

 

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12 minutes ago, 2Far said:

Hmm, the ripped 2x6 is a good idea though I've already capped it and I no longer have a table saw (don't ask).

Yeah, I think I'll just glue on some dry wall, fill the craters and cover with a molding. It had door casing around it before.

I am not as dumb as I pretend to be.  Cap it with a steel plate lag bolted down good and secure.  Plate is pre drilled around edges so you can bolt butcher block on.  Drill relief holes in back of butcher block to let it sit flush over the lag bolt heads securing steel plate to the cap.  Get a bigger butcher block than you need and cut the final shape once you have it bolted down.

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Just now, 2Far said:

Yeah, fersur back splash (ship lap) will be on the kitchen side.

I was just seeing if I was overthinking this.

My biggest concern would be attachment of the counter to that top plate and bracing.  People tend to lean on, against those things, or even sit on them.  

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15 minutes ago, 2Far said:

Yeah, it'll only be about 1&3/4" wide, I think the screw will break it pretty quickly.

you'll have it covered or spackled anyway.  Construction glue will make it not want to lay flat, and the piece on the end will leave the paper on the wall and the rest of the drywall will peel off.

And jsharr's concern is real - you will need to add some bracing.

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1 hour ago, jsharr said:

I am not as dumb as I pretend to be.  Cap it with a steel plate lag bolted down good and secure.  Plate is pre drilled around edges so you can bolt butcher block on.  Drill relief holes in back of butcher block to let it sit flush over the lag bolt heads securing steel plate to the cap.  Get a bigger butcher block than you need and cut the final shape once you have it bolted down.

Yeah, I can see most of that but I'm going to need a sketch on the "Plate is pre drilled around edges so you can bolt butcher block on." portion.

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21 minutes ago, jsharr said:

My biggest concern would be attachment of the counter to that top plate and bracing.  People tend to lean on, against those things, or even sit on them.  

The original bar had wood angle brackets spaced around the living room side. I'd prolly do the same on the 45 & dining side.

Yeah, even then, It probably wouldn't survive me sitting on it. Been11+ years, nobody's been on it yet.

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1 minute ago, 2Far said:

Yeah, I can see most of that but I'm going to need a sketch on the "Plate is pre drilled around edges so you can bolt butcher block on." portion.

Not to scale, but something like this.  Plate would be made to size of counter top.  Would still need some additional bracing.  Would not want to rely simple on lag bolts through plate into the top of the wall.



image.png.9893bed911fed64db7813c3da9dacb66.png

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11 minutes ago, 12string said:

you'll have it covered or spackled anyway.  Construction glue will make it not want to lay flat, and the piece on the end will leave the paper on the wall and the rest of the drywall will peel off.

And jsharr's concern is real - you will need to add some bracing.

I was thinking I'd one of those tile adhesive trowels with the grooves to schmear the glue out, put the drywall on, then use a 2x4 & clamps to squeeze it tight.

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2 minutes ago, jsharr said:

Not to scale, but something like this.  Plate would be made to size of counter top.  Would still need some additional bracing.  Would not want to rely simple on lag bolts through plate into the top of the wall.



image.png.9893bed911fed64db7813c3da9dacb66.png

That's only good it the counter top extends over the outside of the wall enough to ensure the bolts don't split the countertop.

The long straight will look something like this:

 

image.png.f819db379d0e5fd42eb96f0b2a276e40.png

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5 minutes ago, 2Far said:

I was thinking I'd one of those tile adhesive trowels with the grooves to schmear the glue out, put the drywall on, then use a 2x4 & clamps to squeeze it tight.

The problem with gluing drywall is that drywall is layers, and you actually only glue the paper, leaving the rest to peel off.  You have to spackle anyway,  Go easy with the screws, you only need 2, you can make it work.

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1 minute ago, 12string said:

The problem with gluing drywall is that drywall is layers, and you actually only glue the paper, leaving the rest to peel off.  You have to spackle anyway,  Go easy with the screws, you only need 2, you can make it work.

10-4. I see your point. I think I may pre-drill the holes.

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1 minute ago, 2Far said:

That's only good it the counter top extends over the outside of the wall enough to ensure the bolts don't split the countertop.

The long straight will look something like this:

 

image.png.f819db379d0e5fd42eb96f0b2a276e40.png

That is not a counter top.  That is simply a wall cap.  Just counter sink screw holes and then cap them with wood plugs.  If you are going with natural wood finish, then get a wood plug cutter and cut your own plugs from the same wood you use for the cap.



 

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11 minutes ago, jsharr said:

That is not a counter top.  That is simply a wall cap.  Just counter sink screw holes and then cap them with wood plugs.  If you are going with natural wood finish, then get a wood plug cutter and cut your own plugs from the same wood you use for the cap.



 

Was trying to avoid that. Each hole/plug combo is just another opportunity for blemish (not looking like it does on the TV shows).

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Just now, 2Far said:

Was trying to avoid that. Each hole/plug combo is just another opportunity for blemish (not looking like it does on the TV shows).

nah, plug em, cut em flush with a back saw and then sand the whole thing with a finish sander.  The look of the wood plugs will make it seem more finished.

 

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21 minutes ago, 2Far said:

That's only good it the counter top extends over the outside of the wall enough to ensure the bolts don't split the countertop.

The long straight will look something like this:

 

image.png.f819db379d0e5fd42eb96f0b2a276e40.png

That looks like an 8" board. Construction adhesive and finish nails. Big deal.

Otherwise (if the 2x4 wasn't in place), back it up with a cleat and fasten the cleat to the wall securely.

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