Jump to content

Why Do Folks Live Where It Gets to 100+F and 115+F Heat Index?


Razors Edge
 Share

Recommended Posts



30-32 degrees C is my level of heat tolerance and 100% humidity for a few days.  That's it.

I have zero interest in being a Canadian snowbird in Florida, Arizona (I realize it's dry there but arid landscapes don't really turn me on.).  If I won the lottery, it would be 2nd place in Hawai'i with some wind (hopefully not so much that cycling would be a hassle.).  I wouldn't want to plan my outdoor activities just to avoid high heat/humidity during day when there's daylight.  For sure, when hot and humid, may there not be mosquitoes.  Mossies and me, don't do well since I have a slight allergic reaction to mosqitoes. :(

For me 15-22 degrees C is fine/lovely cycling weather for several hrs...anywhere in the world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we're more miserable in Baltimore in 90F days due to the almost-constant high humidity than my cousin in Arizona with 100F and low humidity.

Note that the original European settlers in what became the mid-Atlantic and NE States were lied to in their original homes in England and Holland - which are at Canadian latitudes - in the 1600's about the weather conditions in the new colonies to the south and weren't told about the hot summers and cold winters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The desert areas of CA are sparsely populated. Most of the people live within 50 miles of the coast.   The Las Vegas & Phoenix metro areas are huge and people seem to tolerate the heat just fine.

From personal experience I can handle 110 degrees of dry heat better than 95 degrees of humid heat.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, ChrisL said:

From personal experience I can handle 110 degrees of dry heat better than 95 degrees of humid heat.

I seem to have no problem with the humidity except that I sweat profusely.  I think nothing of heading out for a couple hours on the bike in 100+ weather, but am now an expert sunscreen applier.  I did buy the white sun protecting sleeves last August, but never used them. 

It is annoying, though, in August to ride to the Metro before 8am, and have to wipe my face down from the sweat that early in the AM.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

I seem to have no problem with the humidity except that I sweat profusely.  I think nothing of heading out for a couple hours on the bike in 100+ weather, but am now an expert sunscreen applier.  I did buy the white sun protecting sleeves last August, but never used them. 

It is annoying, though, in August to ride to the Metro before 8am, and have to wipe my face down from the sweat that early in the AM.   

I never had any heat related illnesses back east but several guys “fell out” on deployments in Arlington Cemetary for Memorial Day and 4th of July events.  Wearing dress blues in DC summers is brutal but just wearing a uniform & boots is disgustingly uncomfortable.  

I never had to dress nicely in Vegas or Phoenix so can’t compare on a true apples to apples basis but did wear shorts & T-shirt’s back east and it’s more uncomfortable to me for sure.

With my island skin the sun doesn’t affect me like some but i do put sunblock on my face & neck. Arms & legs have never burned.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, ChrisL said:

Arms & legs have never burned.

I have a nice "permanent" farmer's tan on my arms where my bike jerseys' sleeves end.  It is amazing that my pale pasty chest & shoulders still transition to that pronounced tan line on my arms even at this time of year.  I burn like hell, so sunscreen is an essential requirement, but even that doesn't stop the gradual tanning over the summer. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ChrisL said:

The desert areas of CA are sparsely populated. Most of the people live within 50 miles of the coast.   The Las Vegas & Phoenix metro areas are huge and people seem to tolerate the heat just fine.

From personal experience I can handle 110 degrees of dry heat better than 95 degrees of humid heat.

I was stationed for a couple of years in Key West.  After a while you get used to it.  The shock factor was that I went there after wintering in Great Lakes.  I walked out of the plane and thought it was over, right there.  Then there was the "other" place.  Wholly Carp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...