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How many of you use Lithium batteries in your torches (flashlights) for cold weather use?


sheep_herder
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43 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

I couldn't resist an opportunity to do a Ralphism.

And it was a (Sam) Goodie!  I know that because I never even thought of that one. :) And my brother was a huge Detroit Tigers fan in the 60s and 70s, So Al Kaline was a household word back then.  And we had a guy at work with a similar name who was then of course always referred to as, "Al Kaline".  :D

 

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Torches (Flashlights). Linguists determine when language suibgroups separated from each other by which nouns become completely different.  For example, if they have similar words for numbers, animals, etc. but totally different words for saddle, bridle, harness, etc. they probably separated before the taming of the horse.

British and American English have big differences in automotive terminology and many electrical things. Personally, I like "torch" better than "flashlight," - the latter word coming from the first American ones being used to flash warnings or signals by railroad workers.

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36 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

Torches (Flashlights). Linguists determine when language suibgroups separated from each other by which nouns become completely different.  For example, if they have similar words for numbers, animals, etc. but totally different words for saddle, bridle, harness, etc. they probably separated before the taming of the horse.

British and American English have big differences in automotive terminology and many electrical things. Personally, I like "torch" better than "flashlight," - the latter word coming from the first American ones being used to flash warnings or signals by railroad workers.

If you were British and were subject to the vagaries of Lucas electronics you'd be searching for new and colorful words too.

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18 hours ago, sheep_herder said:

We had to go to these last year, as the alkali batteries just didn't last in the cold weather.  I know Razor Edge will say it is cheaper to move to a warmer place.?

Not cheaper - BETTER :D

Are you using rechargeable lithium batteries or just regular ones? Also, I've only seen small lithium non-chargeables - like 9v, AA, & AAA.  Haven't seen (or looked for) C or D sizes, which are what my bigger flashlights take.

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13 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Not cheaper - BETTER :D

Are you using rechargeable lithium batteries or just regular ones? Also, I've only seen small lithium non-chargeables - like 9v, AA, & AAA.  Haven't seen (or looked for) C or D sizes, which are what my bigger flashlights take.

I use the regular, and have gone to the lights that use 6 AA batteries. They are spendy, but small and very bright, beams that are sometimes needed to find critters at night in a snow storm. Ones, similar to these. I have several larger flash lights that take 4 D cell batteries, but find these smaller lights less bulky and much brighter.

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1 hour ago, jsharr said:

My good lights are all LED with rechargeable LiOn batteries, either custom made packs or 18650s

I am seldom out below about 20 degrees and I do not have issue with alkaline batteries in my Blackdiamond headlamp.

The batteries probably stay warm since the headlamp is mounted on your head.

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11 minutes ago, Longjohn said:

The batteries probably stay warm since the headlamp is mounted on your head.

You just made my day by proving wrong all the people that said the lump between my shoulders was good for absolutely nothing!!! I can warm batteries with it!  

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1 hour ago, Razors Edge said:

Not cheaper - BETTER :D

Are you using rechargeable lithium batteries or just regular ones? Also, I've only seen small lithium non-chargeables - like 9v, AA, & AAA.  Haven't seen (or looked for) C or D sizes, which are what my bigger flashlights take.

You probably use rechargeable D's  :D

 

Question.  Why am I laughing.

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2 hours ago, jsharr said:

You just made my day by proving wrong all the people that said the lump between my shoulders was good for absolutely nothing!!! I can warm batteries with it!  

Hate to rain on your parade, but I use either without any trouble at 20F.  My concern is when it is near and below zero. Under those conditions Alkaline batteries do not last very long.

It is reported that rechargeable batteries also work poorly in cold temperatures, and they are writing about near freezing.

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19 minutes ago, sheep_herder said:

Hate to rain on your parade, but I use either without any trouble at 20F.  My concern is when it is near and below zero. Under those conditions Alkaline batteries do not last very long.

It is reported that rechargeable batteries also work poorly in cold temperatures, and they are writing about near freezing.

great, my lump is useless once again.  thanks.

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4 hours ago, sheep_herder said:

I use the regular, and have gone to the lights that use 6 AA batteries. They are spendy, but small and very bright, beams that are sometimes needed to find critters at night in a snow storm. Ones, similar to these. I have several larger flash lights that take 4 D cell batteries, but find these smaller lights less bulky and much brighter.

I also use AA batteries in the two LED flashlights I keep in my car. One uses 3 AA batteries and is a small but very bright regular flashlight mainly used outside the car and the other, I think, also uses 3 batteries and has a magnetic base so you can stick it on the inside of your hood, etc. when you need to work on something in the dark - fortunately, I've never needed it: it came with batteries and was on sale at Harbor Freight for $1.99 a while back and I couldn't resist buying it.

As much as I've checked, they've worked in all weathers, but I don't know how much below 32F I've ever tried them.

In my house I have a flashlight with a lantern battery that's not often used and has been working on the same battery for about 10 years!

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