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On how long @home?


shootingstar
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So maybe the message most people will live at home as long as they possibly can.  I think also self-reporting for census figures, for what people can do interdependently is subjective.  https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-age-of-distinction-dont-believe-the-ageist-myths-we-only-get-better/

Here this writer, draws some Canadian national census statistics taken in 2017:

If asked what percentage of Americans over 65 lived in nursing homes, I’d have ventured, “Maybe 30?” I’d never have arrived at the actual number: 2.5 per cent, down from 5 per cent over the last decade, during which time aging has turned from a taboo topic into a something approaching a trendy one. Even for people 85 and up, the number is only 9 per cent. (In Canada, 92 per cent of men and women aged 65 and over live at home.)

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What about being sick and helpless? I soon learned that more than half of the “oldest old” – ages 85 and up – can go about their everyday activities without any personal assistance. Probably not shovelling their driveways or doing Costco runs, but dressing, cooking and wiping their own butts. People get chronic illnesses, but they learn to live with them. The vast majority of older people live interdependently until they come down with whatever kills them

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31 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

So, what's the gist of this story & thread? Seems "over 65" is an AWFUL starting point for living in a "home".  I'd start at 80 as a better beginning point - especially if the option is living with family or with drop-in assistance.

A lot more people live at home even when they reach 85... The study includes elderly living interdependently with others...which includes drop-in assistance also.

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2 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

A lot more people live at home even when they reach 85... The study includes elderly living interdependently with others...which includes drop-in assistance also.

This is a good thing, correct? Or are you thinking something else?

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Folks out here normally have someone checking on them daily.  Neighbor lady died sitting at her table eating breakfast.  Even if someone was not checking, other neighbors would notice lack of activity.  I can see that this situation could vary greatly from the city to a rural setting. I can tell you of some other situations where someone much younger decides to end things by pulling into the garage of a vacant house for sale and shutting the garage door. RE I think you often worry unnecessarily, about things that may or may not happen.

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We were able to keep my mom home but it required having a sibling move in with her for care.  

After her stroke she rebounded to about 85% of her old self so we thought she was good living alone.  Until she double dosed on her insulin and almost died... Luckily it was trash night so I came by to take the trash out and found her passed out, BG 35...

We hired a service that checked on her 2X a day, we took weekend shifts for a couple of years before she needed 24 hour care.

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8 hours ago, sheep_herder said:

Folks out here normally have someone checking on them daily.  Neighbor lady died sitting at her table eating breakfast.  Even if someone was not checking, other neighbors would notice lack of activity.  I can see that this situation could vary greatly from the city to a rural setting. I can tell you of some other situations where someone much younger decides to end things by pulling into the garage of a vacant house for sale and shutting the garage door. RE I think you often worry unnecessarily, about things that may or may not happen.

A good friend of mine in Toronto several decades ago, lived in an apartment building in the heart of downtown.  Over a few days, residents noticed a smell in the hallway:

A lady had died several days ago in bed.

The situation of solo resident, not checked is real.  

Dearie's mother @90 collapsed in her apartment suite. She couldn't move to her phone. So she was on the floor for 2 days. A neighbour found her.

I've heard personally of 2 situations, where the adult child hooked up a security camera inside the house (with knowledge of resident).  One guy decided to have camera under his mom's bed, at least he can see her feet touch the ground..meaning she got up or went to bed..

This can be a hard part: who does one trust to be checked daily?  Of course, nowadays, we do have technology....so one can skype with trusted person daily for a hello.

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5 hours ago, shootingstar said:

A good friend of mine in Toronto several decades ago, lived in an apartment building in the heart of downtown.  Over a few days, residents noticed a smell in the hallway:

A lady had died several days ago in bed.

The situation of solo resident, not checked is real.  

Dearie's mother @90 collapsed in her apartment suite. She couldn't move to her phone. So she was on the floor for 2 days. A neighbour found her.

I've heard personally of 2 situations, where the adult child hooked up a security camera inside the house (with knowledge of resident).  One guy decided to have camera under his mom's bed, at least he can see her feet touch the ground..meaning she got up or went to bed..

This can be a hard part: who does one trust to be checked daily?  Of course, nowadays, we do have technology....so one can skype with trusted person daily for a hello.

As I stated, things in the city are probably very different than in rural situations.  Here groups from church work toward monitoring where needed.  A group of ladies from town formed a visitation program for a relatively young lady with ALS, but she eventually moved into a home, and then decided to remove all help.

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I live in what is called "sheltered housing" and this is rented from the Region. It's a small flat which is festooned with alarm cords and is connected to an intercom which allows a care team to call and check if the alarm is triggered. In addition, there is a device which begins blinking at around 7.30 am and has to be switched off by 11.00 am, otherwise this again triggers an alarm and a care team will visit and gain entry. In addition to these measures, there is a Care Officer who keeps an eye on people like me who tend to fall over on occasion.

I did at one-time, shop and do my own cooking but found this tiresome and especially having to eat alone. Now I walk a few yards and eat lunch at a charity which provides lunch five days a week and I enjoy the company. All in all, it's a great set-up if you have health problems and live alone and I consider myself very fortunate to have found this place. I'm aware that not all are so lucky when they get to my age and suspect it may have something to do with my having lived a virtuous life....probably.

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While my mother is 89, and yes she has medical 'issues' and we see her slowing down. Technically, she doesn't live alone as she has her 3rd husband after the two prior died and raised "proper ladies don't live with a man unmarried" and while he is a few years younger, still drives and they support (financial is not an issue for either) each other. They as a pair actually deliver meals on wheels! But it does remain a concern for us kids. I don't even want them driving the 60 miles over to visit us in Orlando traffic, but the will make the 150 mile trip to visit friends and relatives where she grew up.

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2 hours ago, onbike1939 said:

I live in what is called "sheltered housing" and this is rented from the Region. It's a small flat which is festooned with alarm cords and is connected to an intercom which allows a care team to call and check if the alarm is triggered. In addition, there is a device which begins blinking at around 7.30 am and has to be switched off by 11.00 am, otherwise this again triggers an alarm and a care team will visit and gain entry. In addition to these measures, there is a Care Officer who keeps an eye on people like me who tend to fall over on occasion.

I did at one-time, shop and do my own cooking but found this tiresome and especially having to eat alone. Now I walk a few yards and eat lunch at a charity which provides lunch five days a week and I enjoy the company. All in all, it's a great set-up if you have health problems and live alone and I consider myself very fortunate to have found this place. I'm aware that not all are so lucky when they get to my age and suspect it may have something to do with my having lived a virtuous life....probably.

You are quite lucky , onbike to have that level of support.  

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1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

You are quite lucky , onbike to have that level of support.  

It's all a part of living in a socialist paradise......seriously. :rolleyes:

I have another month or so before I'm rendered down to become Soylent green.

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26 minutes ago, onbike1939 said:

It's all a part of living in a socialist paradise......seriously. :rolleyes:

I have another month or so before I'm rendered down to become Soylent green.

Don't call it "socialism" - just use American euphemism instead.  Folks will defend  stuff if you phrase it properly.

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