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Longjohn

It’s thundering

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5 minutes ago, Longjohn said:

I feel blessed. The sun is shining. I don’t know what is going on.:dontknow:

Thunder is the sound of the air being ripped apart by the explosive heat of the lightning bolt.
 

I would not chance it....

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6 minutes ago, Longjohn said:

I feel blessed. The sun is shining. I don’t know what is going on.:dontknow:

It's called thunder. It accompanies lightning. Might want to be close to shore for a quick escape.  

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3 minutes ago, jsharr said:

If you eat really spicy chili you can get a similar discharge....

https://www.weatheronline.co.uk/reports/wxfacts/Why-Thunder-Rumbles.htm

Why Thunder Rumbles

picture When a lightning bolt flashes through the sky we see it instantly. The following thunder, the sound of the lightning, takes a few seconds longer to reach us, as light reavels much faster than sound. Thunder never just goes "Boom!" and then stops, rather one hears a loud clap followed by several seconds of rumble. Why does thunder rumble? Lightning heats air to more than 20,000°C, much hotter than the surface of the sun is. The sudden heating causes the air to expand as the flash passes trough the atmosphere and immediate cooling contracts the air again. Quick expansion and contraction of air around lightning starts air molecules moving back and forth, creating sound waves. As this is happening extremely fast we will hear the 'clap' of a thunder.

 

Now imagine a lightning bolt. They can be several miles long, no matter if it is a cloud to cloud or cloud to ground discharge. Lets say the nearest part of the bolt is one mile away. Sound travels about a mile in 5 seconds, thus you will hear the first part - the clap of the lightning - five seconds after the flash. If the farthest part of the bolt is three miles away, it will take 15 seconds to hear that part of the bolt. From second 5 to second 15 after the flash you will hear every different part (clap) in between, resulting in a rumbling sound. The end of the rumble is the farthest part of the bolt.

 

Often the thunder gets softer, then louder, then softer, and so on. It makes sense that as one hear parts of the lightning that are farther away that the sound would get softer, just as other sounds are louder when they are near and softer when the source of the sound is farther away. This has to do with the shape of a lightning bolt. Lightning bolts are not straight, rather they "zig zag" forth and back in different angles, towards and away from the observer point.

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My neighbor is scared to death of lightning, we'll be sitting on our back porches, about 30 feet apart, shooting the shit, a clap of thunder and he gets nervous, a visible lightning bolt and he's gone.

Me, I'm tempted to fly a kite.... 

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41 minutes ago, Further said:

My neighbor is scared to death of lightning, we'll be sitting on our back porches, about 30 feet apart, shooting the shit, a clap of thunder and he gets nervous, a visible lightning bolt and he's gone.

Me, I'm tempted to fly a kite.... 

So you must get quite a charge out of lightning.

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We’ve had lightning and thunder for about 30 minutes now. Morning, partly cloudy, it looks like someone is taking pictures with a flashbulb. 

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When you coach high school sports in Maryland, games and practice must be delayed as soon as thunder is heard or lightning is seen and must remain delayed until 30 minutes after the last thunder/lightning occurrence.

That's a little overkill designed to make sure the school systems don't get sued for lightning striking teenagers, but it's a good general idea.

On the other hand, it's often not easy to find a place to get out of the storm while you're in a boat.  We have been caught in a few storms while boating on the Chesapeake where we either headed for the marina/boatel a half hour away or rode out the storm, putting everyone in the little cuddy cabin except one person to keep steering.

A boat in a storm is worth the experience - if you survive it. On the Bay, those storms often come with big waves and you have to point your bow away from them to avoid sinking. As the waves are passing they reach the front of the boat and lift it and the propeller can be heard spinning out of the water - several feet above it - and as the stern of the boat begins to drop down toward the water it looks like the next wave is going to swamp the boat.  But the leading edge of the wave lifts it back up.  What a thrill!

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1 minute ago, Razors Edge said:

What? You? Nervous?

Where's the real LJ???? This imposter needs to go!

The real LJ is posting from his oncologist’s examining room. Waiting for Amanda to come in. This too makes me a little nervous. The groping part is good though. 😜

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