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RalphWaldoMooseworth

Update old laptop to 10 with SSD, or just go Chrome?

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I am leaning toward the first since our Christmas Pollyanna has a $75 limit and I can get a SSD for that.  I know the latter probably makes much more sense, but sense has never been my strong point. :D  I like keeping old stuff and I am am leery of Google. 

 

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Well sir Leery, I'm sure that Satya of Microsoft will be pleased to accept your oath of fealty.

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Since putting a new SSD in, do a fresh installation of Windows with a cheap authorization key off ebay for less than $15. Can't be an upgrade, then re-install programs and transfer photos and other documents. While it wasn't a laptop, built 2 PC's that way with no problem, using an old USB Windows 10 Home to prepare the drive and install without registration key (trial mode) and when running/updated, entered registration and it further upgraded it to Pro installing/activating the additional files. While it sounds shady, appears to be legit and part of some European Union settlement with Microsoft.

While you may want to do a final backup of the hard drive in case the above doesn't work, but don't use it as backs up viruses and all to reinstall. Most programs can be re-installed from download and enter your registration code for that program. Photos and other documents save to a large capacity USB memory stick to directly transfer to the new SSD, or better yet, reserve the lower capacity SSD for operating system and programs but keep the photos and other documents on an external hard drive in which case can skip the USB and transfer them directly there. That is my setup on my MacBook Pro … 250 SSD and 1T USB harddrive which I can plug into any computer - but Windows can only read the smaller FAT formatted partition, where Apple can read both which is frustrating when the desired file in in the larger partition. 

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I have read that one can install W10 and run it without a key. You just have to suffer the nag screen to validate your installation. 

I'm not recommending that course, it just seems appropriate for Ralph. :lol:

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4 hours ago, RalphWaldoMooseworth said:

I am leaning toward the first since our Christmas Pollyanna has a $75 limit and I can get a SSD for that.  I know the latter probably makes much more sense, but sense has never been my strong point. :D I like keeping old stuff and I am am leery of Google. 

 

Your options are 1) get an SSD for ~$75 and reinstall Windows on an existing laptop or 2) BUY a Chromebook (more than $75)?

I'd say go with #1.  Certainly there are positives and negatives to both options, but Windows is more flexible overall than a Chrome OS and less finicky than a Linux OS.  All three are legit ways to do stuff, but Win 10 is the most well rounded.

If you have a license for 10 or an older license to upgrade, the full featured Win 10 is nice. Or, the route Don mentions - perennial trial mode - will work, but there will be a nag to register and some functions (like customization) will be disabled.

Some folks, like my mom, are ONLY web users. A Google Chromebook is certainly a viable option for her.  I use plenty of other things on my main laptops, so I prefer a full OS, but I could definitely see having just a Chromebook for light browsing.

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1 hour ago, Razors Edge said:

Your options are 1) get an SSD for ~$75 and reinstall Windows on an existing laptop or 2) BUY a Chromebook (more than $75)?

I'd say go with #1.  Certainly there are positives and negatives to both options, but Windows is more flexible overall than a Chrome OS and less finicky than a Linux OS.  All three are legit ways to do stuff, but Win 10 is the most well rounded.

If you have a license for 10 or an older license to upgrade, the full featured Win 10 is nice. Or, the route Don mentions - perennial trial mode - will work, but there will be a nag to register and some functions (like customization) will be disabled.

Some folks, like my mom, are ONLY web users. A Google Chromebook is certainly a viable option for her.  I use plenty of other things on my main laptops, so I prefer a full OS, but I could definitely see having just a Chromebook for light browsing.

I use both.  I still have a windows 10 desktop in the lab and I also use a chromebook while sitting in the living room just browsing or shooting the shit with forumites.

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I've had trouble in the past on a couple laptops upgrading them to new Windows editions because the HP or whatever additional software doesn't have upgrades that work well with it.  So in general I haven't tried to upgrade Win 7 computers I had.  I guess there are some advantages to Win 10, but I don't think I'd personally be any slower if Windows still had the Win 3.1 screen.

One though, was just a beta edition of Windows 98 before it came out (a student's father worked for someone who had access to it and gave me a copy). Some software was tricky to open without setting up "open as" conditions and sometimes I had to boot it 3-4 times before it loaded everything in.

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I tossed an SSD into my old Dell laptop.  Used a cable to clone the old drive onto the new, as I was already running 10 and did a simple swap.  Easy Peasy.

The install, upgrade path works well also.  

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How old is the laptop? Some older hardware just won't handle Windows 10. I would also recommend 8GB of RAM if you don't have it. 

I agree with jsharr. Do the Windows 10 upgrade, then clone to the new drive. If there is a UEFI boot issue, you may have to install from scratch, but I would try the easy route, first. 

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Also, for those with any interest in a modicum of privacy, Chrome is a non-starter. I'd never recommend a person use Chrome as a browser let alone an OS until first verifying they don't mind being under constant surveillance.  Most folks are fine with that.

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I have an old Dell, it has a soldered in graphics car that is not 10 compatible, and the vendor will not create an updated driver.  It will go in the trash at the beginning of the year.

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1 hour ago, MickinMD said:

I've had trouble in the past on a couple laptops upgrading them to new Windows editions because the HP or whatever additional software doesn't have upgrades that work well with it.  So in general I haven't tried to upgrade Win 7 computers I had.  I guess there are some advantages to Win 10, but I don't think I'd personally be any slower if Windows still had the Win 3.1 screen.

One though, was just a beta edition of Windows 98 before it came out (a student's father worked for someone who had access to it and gave me a copy). Some software was tricky to open without setting up "open as" conditions and sometimes I had to boot it 3-4 times before it loaded everything in.

I had similar problem with Windows on laptop. Of course it was Windows 8 at the time. Took the laptop back to Best Buy and got a MacBook Pro still using today. Microsoft essentially pushed away someone who had one of the original PC, but even Pachard Hell couldn’t push me away, building my PC’s from 286 machines on to my current 3 core i7 machines.

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8 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

Well sir Leery, I'm sure that Satya of Microsoft will be pleased to accept your oath of fealty.

I read that as fertility.

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I like Chromebook because I won't do any work on it. #winning

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4 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

Also, for those with any interest in a modicum of privacy, Chrome is a non-starter. I'd never recommend a person use Chrome as a browser let alone an OS until first verifying they don't mind being under constant surveillance.  Most folks are fine with that.

What have you got to hide?

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