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Great U.S. Drought Map


Dottleshead

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No wonder most you folks outside of the West and Texas don't give a crap about drought.  This map might help explain things.  If you go to the web page and click under maps you can get a slider that compares dates.  Pretty great map.  Notice @Page Turner your state is no longer a problem this year.  No crying from the Sacratomato Valley please.

Drought Monitor for conus

 

https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Maps/CompareTwoWeeks.aspx

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On 1/16/2020 at 2:23 PM, Dottie said:

No wonder most you folks outside of the West and Texas don't give a crap about drought.  This map might help explain things.  If you go to the web page and click under maps you can get a slider that compares dates.  Pretty great map.  Notice @Page Turner your state is no longer a problem this year.  No crying from the Sacratomato Valley please.

Drought Monitor for conus

 

https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Maps/CompareTwoWeeks.aspx

Water's not just a problem in the west.  I'm concerned not just about droughts, but about U.S. freshwater supplies in general.

Several years ago, ore freighters on Lake Superior couldn't dock in some places because the water level had fallen so low.

The Ogallala Reservoir, the huge underground lake under several states in the center of the USA, is going dry. A century ago, a farmer needed to drill a well 40 feet deep to get water.  Today it's 440 feet deep.  Eventually, large parts of the central states may have to resort to dry farming. One state legislature wanted to pump Gulf of Mexico water and create a huge lake in Kansas to replenish the Ogallala, but that's not likely to work.

In Tennessee, there are some towns where the wells no longer work and they truck in drinking water.

In Georgia, instead of putting excellent research centers like Georgia Tech to work to solve the fresh water shortage, the Governor asked people to pray for rain and then claimed the border was drawn wrong and tried to steal a river from Tennessee.

On top of all that, if current immigration rates are allowed to continue, the population will at least double by the end of the century and serious water problems will exist.

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15 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

Water's not just a problem in the west.  I'm concerned not just about droughts, but about U.S. freshwater supplies in general.

Several years ago, ore freighters on Lake Superior couldn't dock in some places because the water level had fallen so low.

The Ogallala Reservoir, the huge underground lake under several states in the center of the USA, is going dry. A century ago, a farmer needed to drill a well 40 feet deep to get water.  Today it's 440 feet deep.  Eventually, large parts of the central states may have to resort to dry farming. One state legislature wanted to pump Gulf of Mexico water and create a huge lake in Kansas to replenish the Ogallala, but that's not likely to work.

In Tennessee, there are some towns where the wells no longer work and they truck in drinking water.

In Georgia, instead of putting excellent research centers like Georgia Tech to work to solve the fresh water shortage, the Governor asked people to pray for rain and then claimed the border was drawn wrong and tried to steal a river from Tennessee.

On top of all that, if current immigration rates are allowed to continue, the population will at least double by the end of the century and serious water problems will exist.

You forgot to mention global warming which is happening -- but I'm not here to debate what the cause of that is folks -- so relax -- politics avoided.  No doubt our average globe temps are on the rise though.  Don't forget the warm ocean blob that is killing off the ecosystem.  First recorded in 2014.  Red areas are a 6 Celsius degree change.  Good times.

Image result for pacific ocean blob map

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The last 2 years we've had about 25% more rain than average causing a lot of flooding. If you'd like to divert a little of the Missouri River your way, I wouldn't mind.

As @MickinMD noted, the Ogallala has been drying up. Wells were running dry along the Texas - New Mexico border back in the '70s when I lived there. Farmers irrigate their crops like crazy down there. They are pumping the Ogallala dry.

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