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$1.55 million


Prophet Zacharia
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As compensation for wrongly spending 23 years in prison due to fabricated evidence and coerced witness testimony. Is that enough? I would triple the damages as it was a Police Department conspiracy that resulted in his conviction.

 

Lamonte McIntyre, who served 23 years in prison for two murders he did not commit, will receive a certificate of innocence and $1.55 million as part of settlement of his wrongful conviction lawsuit, Kansas’ attorney general said Monday.

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No, it is not enough.  He was 17 when he was arrested.  He is 40 now.  He was denied an opportunity to further his education or gain any real job experience so he'll have trouble finding a reasonably paying job to keep himself gainfully employed for the next 25 years when he can retire.  I am going to assume he is only qualified for minimum wage jobs.  To live an average lifestyle, he'll have to tap into that money immediately.  Has he had the opportunity to pay into Social Security?  If not then he'll have to fund most of his retirement.

Has the police officer who fabricated the evidence been arrested yet?  

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38 minutes ago, Mr. Silly said:

 

Has the police officer who fabricated the evidence been arrested yet?  

I haven’t read about him, so I can only assume he died. It appears he forced the defendant’s mother to have sex with him, then prosecuted her son when she objected. He sexually intimidated a female witness to testify about the boy being the shooter, had a photo line-up consisting of the “suspect”, his brothers and cousins, etc.

49 minutes ago, donkpow said:

$67K/yr average. Plus free meals, housing, clothes, etc.

If that were the settlement the government offered moving forward I would reconsider my concerns. But in a residential community free of armed guards, uniforms and meal lines. But for the past two years, he’s been out of jail, received an apology from the Governor, but been unable to work due to failing background checks. He can’t even volunteer at the Boys & Girls Club. So I still think I want more for him.

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So 1.5 million, clear record, 2 years of the state offered healthcare and tuition waver for an education at a state university.  I still think they need to up that ante.  More money up front, health care until he has a degree and employment, same state pension plan as a state employee with 23 years of tenure and 23 years for average pay history.  

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It say "part" of his settlement. What's the rest?

If it was $5 million to him straight away, even assume no taxes, there's a good chance he'd end up in poverty due to lack of education and to financial predators like 4 of 5 NFL players are within 5 years of retiring.

On the other hand, if it was $1.55 million plus $100,000 per year for the rest of his life, he'd live well if there was a restriction on borrowing against future pension payments.

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19 minutes ago, MickinMD said:

If it was $5 million to him straight away, even assume no taxes, there's a good chance he'd end up in poverty due to lack of education and to financial predators like 4 of 5 NFL players are within 5 years of retiring.

Did you ever look at the statistics about how many people who win considerably more money from the lottery are bankrupt in just a few years?  

Maybe this guy will use the money for education, and/or planning a future. But the odds are that won't happen.

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How about they compensate him with the salary the chief of police received, with interest for every year he was incarcerated and they annually pay him the same amount, with all bonuses and benefits, including health care, that the chief of police receives for life?

Get him counselling and pay for him to to have the services of a finanical advisor to help him learn to manage his money.

Provide him with a minimum of a 4 year degree after doing aptitude testing to make sure his field of study is a good fit.

They robbed him of the prime of his life.  Trying to start a family at age 40?  Have a wife or husband, kids, life experiences.

The debt he is owed can never be fully repaid, but $1.55 million is simply not enough.

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Just now, Prophet Zacharia said:

I’m thinking he isn’t one who should trust the government to look out for his best interest.

I get that.  But in fairness to Mick and to the guy who got royally screwed, we do have mountains of evidence suggesting that folks who are unprepared for sudden windfalls are going to face steep hurdles in keeping that money.

Paying it out - in a big lump at the beginning, and then properly structuring a fair deal to keep him compensated over time is the best mix. I hope he gets a fighting chance to prosper in the second half of his life.  

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3 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Paying it out - in a big lump at the beginning, and then properly structuring a fair deal to keep him compensated over time is the best mix. I hope he gets a fighting chance to prosper in the second half of his life.  

This would be a better plan compared to just paying a bigger lump sum.

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