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Canada has lots of Y,s


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4 minutes ago, Kirby said:

You're not going to YUL?

Not this trip but we may go to Norway next Christmas and we’d fly from Montreal as irs less than an hour from my parents house and we’d be there already.

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7 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

A little trivia for you..

IATA airport codes are what you and the airline use to identify an airport.  They are comprised of three letters.  Typically, they reflect the name of the town they serve.  CDG is Charles De Gaul.  FFA is Kitty Hawk NC.  (First Flight Airport). GEG is Spokane (Geiger Field).

ICAO codes are what pilots and ATC use.  They are comprised of four letters and the letters actually mean something.  Every licensed airport in Canada starts with the letter "C".  The "Y" that follows it indicates Weather observation available ("Y" - Yes). The last two letters identify the sight.  "CD" for Example is Cassidy, Where @Zephyr lives.  VR is Vancouver, etc.  Ottawa, CYOW, used to be CYHQ (headquarters) of the government.

That does not apply universally though so the US airports normally start with a "K".  Unless of course it is controlled by the Pacific control region, in which case, it starts with a "P'.  Of course the Navy wouldn't stand for  being ruled by civil standards so the Navy airports start with an "N". 

The last three letters are often the same as the three letter IATA code and they identify the location.  In the good old days, US airports only had two letter identifiers so places like Los Angeles got "LA".  To later fit the IATA and ICAO identification codes another letter was required so "X" was assigned as the last letter in the code.  That applies to any US airport ending in "X". 

There you have it. 

I’ve seen the airport in Haiti as PAP and MTPP. I guess this may explain why.

the flights we are looking at has one keg on a Dash 8. I’m guessing that is a prop plane?

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Just now, Zackny said:

I’ve seen the airport in Haiti as PAP and MTPP. I guess this may explain why.

the flights we are looking at has one keg on a Dash 8. I’m guessing that is a prop plane?

In Canada, we still serve beer in kegs.  Enjoy  :)   Yes, DeHavilland Dash 8.  Is that the Halifax to Torbay leg?  (YYT). :) 

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Just now, Wilbur said:

In Canada, we still serve beer in kegs.  Enjoy  :)   Yes, DeHavilland Dash 8.  Is that the Halifax to Torbay leg?  (YYT). :) 

Yes. 

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1 minute ago, Wilbur said:

It will be operated by Jazz for AC.  They are a good carrier.  The East coast fleet is mainly older 100 and 200 series so it will be a little noisy and lots of vibration.  :) 

Sounds about right for a prop. At least any I’ve flown in were loud.

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44 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

It will be operated by Jazz for AC.  They are a good carrier.  The East coast fleet is mainly older 100 and 200 series so it will be a little noisy and lots of vibration.  :) 

Years ago I was doing EA work associated with the Great Whale Hydro project. We flew from Kuujjuarapik to Montreal on a four prop plane. Partway through the flight there was a loud noise and a big vibration for just a second. Somehow we had lost a propeller. It was just gone. Suppose we were lucky it didn’t tear into the plane. 

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1 hour ago, Wilbur said:

A little trivia for you..

IATA airport codes are what you and the airline use to identify an airport.  They are comprised of three letters.  Typically, they reflect the name of the town they serve.  CDG is Charles De Gaul.  FFA is Kitty Hawk NC.  (First Flight Airport). GEG is Spokane (Geiger Field).

ICAO codes are what pilots and ATC use.  They are comprised of four letters and the letters actually mean something.  Every licensed airport in Canada starts with the letter "C".  The "Y" that follows it indicates Weather observation available ("Y" - Yes). The last two letters identify the sight.  "CD" for Example is Cassidy, Where @Zephyr lives.  VR is Vancouver, etc.  Ottawa, CYOW, used to be CYHQ (headquarters) of the government.

That does not apply universally though so the US airports normally start with a "K".  Unless of course it is controlled by the Pacific control region, in which case, it starts with a "P'.  Of course the Navy wouldn't stand for  being ruled by civil standards so the Navy airports start with an "N". 

The last three letters are often the same as the three letter IATA code and they identify the location.  In the good old days, US airports only had two letter identifiers so places like Los Angeles got "LA".  To later fit the IATA and ICAO identification codes another letter was required so "X" was assigned as the last letter in the code.  That applies to any US airport ending in "X". 

There you have it. 

Sometimes you have to wonder if those that assign the codes actually look at them afterward. I mean, would you want to fly from BUM to POO?

https://www.prokerala.com/travel/airports/united-states-of-america/butler-airport.html

https://www.news.com.au/news/how-airports-get-their-threeletter-code-names/news-story/4559766fca60708e7e7d8f8fa216c876

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1 hour ago, Wilbur said:

A little trivia for you..

IATA airport codes are what you and the airline use to identify an airport.  They are comprised of three letters.  Typically, they reflect the name of the town they serve.  CDG is Charles De Gaul.  FFA is Kitty Hawk NC.  (First Flight Airport). GEG is Spokane (Geiger Field).

ICAO codes are what pilots and ATC use.  They are comprised of four letters and the letters actually mean something.  Every licensed airport in Canada starts with the letter "C".  The "Y" that follows it indicates Weather observation available ("Y" - Yes). The last two letters identify the sight.  "CD" for Example is Cassidy, Where @Zephyr lives.  VR is Vancouver, etc.  Ottawa, CYOW, used to be CYHQ (headquarters) of the government.

That does not apply universally though so the US airports normally start with a "K".  Unless of course it is controlled by the Pacific control region, in which case, it starts with a "P'.  Of course the Navy wouldn't stand for  being ruled by civil standards so the Navy airports start with an "N". 

The last three letters are often the same as the three letter IATA code and they identify the location.  In the good old days, US airports only had two letter identifiers so places like Los Angeles got "LA".  To later fit the IATA and ICAO identification codes another letter was required so "X" was assigned as the last letter in the code.  That applies to any US airport ending in "X". 

There you have it. 

Part of my job is keeping databases updated with all the IATA and ICAO codes. Once one of my coworkers went to update the latitude and longitude of one airport but managed to change it for all the airports in the world. It didn't take long for someone to notice that all flights were planned for only 0 miles.

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23 minutes ago, Rattlecan said:

Sometimes you have to wonder if those that assign the codes actually look at them afterward. I mean, would you want to fly from BUM to POO?

https://www.prokerala.com/travel/airports/united-states-of-america/butler-airport.html

https://www.news.com.au/news/how-airports-get-their-threeletter-code-names/news-story/4559766fca60708e7e7d8f8fa216c876

VHF Navaids all have 3 letter identifiers too.  Reno changed theirs years ago from RNO to FMG.  They also changed the name of the radio to "Mustang".  I wonder why? :whistle:

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51 minutes ago, Wilbur said:

VHF Navaids all have 3 letter identifiers too.  Reno changed theirs years ago from RNO to FMG.  They also changed the name of the radio to "Mustang".  I wonder why? :whistle:

Not something that bearing manufacturer Fischer AG seems to be worried about. 

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2 hours ago, jsharr said:

I prefer YYZ
 

 

So, Alex, Geddy and Neil were out flying a light airplane when Alex turned up the volume to identify the Toronto VOR.  The VOR's transmit their ident in Morse code.  Toronto is YYZ and the opening of the song was inspired by the Morse Code. 

 

 

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