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What businesses will do well during the pandemic?


Randomguy
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39 minutes ago, Further said:

TP makers

I was in Home Depot today. They had TP on several aisles. No limit! (I did not buy any)

We need dust mask in some of the work we do. We were out. Usually we can just go to the store & buy a box. Everybodies out now. Even our online supplier is back ordered.  I stopped by a paint store that we have done some favors for. I begged the manager for anything he might have. Think 1 maybe 2 boxes. He says you are in luck. He takes me to his office and says you want 1 case or 2? A case is 10 boxes. I only took one case. I love when a plan comes together

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15 hours ago, Randomguy said:

What businesses will do well during the pandemic?

Watching today's market seems to indicate none will - in the short term.  There will be very specific "winners" for maybe a few drug makers, but the "winners" will really be the ones that have the cash to start buying up the "losers".  This is a pretty large correction, but clearly there are good bets coming available as their stock prices get slammed.  A big test will be to see which can recover quickest, not which actually do well right now.

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15 hours ago, maddmaxx said:

Mortuaries.

 

 

5 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

Watching today's market seems to indicate none will - in the short term.  There will be very specific "winners" for maybe a few drug makers, but the "winners" will really be the ones that have the cash to start buying up the "losers".  This is a pretty large correction, but clearly there are good bets coming available as their stock prices get slammed.  A big test will be to see which can recover quickest, not which actually do well right now.

Still true.  There might be a market in prepaid.............

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3 hours ago, Razors Edge said:

Watching today's market seems to indicate none will - in the short term.  There will be very specific "winners" for maybe a few drug makers, but the "winners" will really be the ones that have the cash to start buying up the "losers".  This is a pretty large correction, but clearly there are good bets coming available as their stock prices get slammed.  A big test will be to see which can recover quickest, not which actually do well right now.

The rich get richer which is what we are seeing. Consolidation of wealth and power... hmmmm.... that explains the white house coronavirus policy.

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2 minutes ago, Dottles said:

The rich get richer which is what we are seeing. Consolidation of wealth and power... hmmmm.... that explains the white house coronavirus policy.

It is repeated during every big market downturn.  If you are able to ride it out with funds left over (or leverage or credit), you can take advantage of other folks losses.  Not sure I would want to wade into ways to try to "fix" it, since most efforts are either poisoned from the start or immediately gotten around through loopholes.

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32 minutes ago, Razors Edge said:

It is repeated during every big market downturn.  If you are able to ride it out with funds left over (or leverage or credit), you can take advantage of other folks losses.  Not sure I would want to wade into ways to try to "fix" it, since most efforts are either poisoned from the start or immediately gotten around through loopholes.

Something Weird Is Happening on Wall Street, and Not Just the Stock Sell-Off

 

Bond prices and stock prices were moving together, not in opposite directions as they usually do. On a day when major economic disruptions resulting from the coronavirus pandemic appeared to become likelier — which might be expected to make typical market safe havens more popular — many of them fell instead. That included bonds of all sorts and gold.

And there were reports from trading desks that many assets that are normally liquid — easy to buy and sell — were freezing up, with securities not trading widely. This was true of the bonds issued by municipalities and major corporations but, more curiously, also of Treasury bonds, normally the bedrock of the global financial system.

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Lenders are still doing well as long as their employees aren’t impacted. Low interest rates and the Fed May cut rates again next week as a result of the market tanking.

People are taking advantage of the low rates to buy/refi but it’s not really making the news as it’s al about the tanking market & corona virus.

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Fed to pump in more than $1 trillion in dramatic ramping up of market intervention amid coronavirus meltdown

 

However, questions remain whether the Fed can arrest the market’s issues on its own. Wall Street has been looking for an aggressive fiscal response and has yet to get it from Washington lawmakers.

“The virus was the catalyst but it’s not the cause,” said Christopher Whalen, founder of Whalen Global Advisors. “Both bonds and equities were inflated rather dramatically by our friends at the Fed. You’re seeing the end game for monetary policy here, which is at a certain point you have to stop. Otherwise you get grotesque asset bubbles like we saw, and the engine just runs out of fuel.”

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2 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

Lenders are still doing well as long as their employees aren’t impacted. Low interest rates and the Fed May cut rates again next week as a result of the market tanking.

People are taking advantage of the low rates to buy/refi but it’s not really making the news as it’s al about the tanking market & corona virus.

Refi is a great idea if you don't expect to live long enough to pay it off.

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8 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

“The virus was the catalyst but it’s not the cause,”

I wonder how $1 trillion impacts the current budget deficits (just under $1 trillion in 2019) and the ever growing US debt ($22+ trillion)????

What's a few trillion here and there among friends?

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13 minutes ago, maddmaxx said:

Refi is a great idea if you don't expect to live long enough to pay it off.

I refied and would consider it again if it's slashed further. You make a good point but it makes sense if the refi pays for itself in the short term. And if property values continue to rise like they are here regardless of the economy, it makes more sense. In my case, if I live in this house another year and a half, the refi pays for itself and I have reduced my mortgage payment permanently until I sell ... which I will sell... because I know in advance I will never be alive long enough to pay it off. But like you say... I could just live here and die. I have no kids so the only one who gets screwed is the lender. So yeah, we could live here until we die... which means I refi again. Once my spouse or I croak, then this place would have to be sold. We both know this. Or if I lose my job.

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5 minutes ago, Dottles said:

I refied and would consider it again if it's slashed further. You make a good point but it makes sense if the refi pays for itself in the short term. And if property values continue to rise like they are here regardless of the economy, it makes more sense. In my case, if I live in this house another year and a half, the refi pays for itself and I have reduced my mortgage payment permanently until I sell ... which I will sell... because I know in advance I will never be alive long enough to pay it off. But like you say... I could just live here and die. I have no kids so the only one who gets screwed is the lender. So yeah, we could live here until we die... which means I refi again. Once my spouse or I croak, then this place would have to be sold. We both know this. Or if I lose my job.

My wife and I are going through similar discussions.  We will pay off our house in just under 10 years but it needs work. My wife wants to move, I want to stay so we are thinking of making updates that will increase value and make it more nicer for us.

We thought about borrowing on some equity or a refi but we can probably do most of the work on short term credit lines like at Home Depot & pay off the balance before interest hits.

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24 minutes ago, ChrisL said:

... we can probably do most of the work on short term credit lines like at Home Depot & pay off the balance before interest hits.

I bought 2 cars on a Visa card with remarkably low interest rates... but I did it on the condition I would pay it off within 2 years... and both times we did it. You can do a lot if you know you have the resources and discipline on credit. I bought my new car on a 6 year loan knowing it will be paid off in 2.5 years. I really needed the lower payment for the first 6 months of this loan because I was not expecting to buy a new car. But I know after these initial 6 months, I will attack that car loan aggressively. If I lose my job, then we sell our home and pay up our debts and go live with her mother. Not my cup of tea but I could think of worse things.

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