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Just so you know - Hail edition


Randomguy
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Hail forms as droplets of water are carried upward into a thunderstorm. Updraughts carry them into parts of the atmosphere where the air is cold enough to freeze the droplets. Moisture from the air accumulates on the outside of the drops of ice as it moves through the air, causing the hailstone to grow in onion-like layers.

How fast a hailstone grows depends on the amount of moisture in the air. It will continue to grow until the updraught is no longer strong enough to keep it aloft. A 103km/h (64mph) updraft supports hail the size of a golf ball, while one 27% faster can create hailstones the size of baseballs, according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  More humid air and more powerful updraughts will bring bigger hailstones. Often larger hailstones will fall closer to the updraught while smaller hailstones will fall further away, often blown there by cross winds.

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2 minutes ago, Kzoo said:

Ummmmm...... that last picture looks like he beat his car with a rock.  I see the weapon evidence in his hand

She has a rock too!  Crazy!   

 

 

 

 



No chance they tried to use the rocks to hold the tarp down during the storm.

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4 minutes ago, Kzoo said:

Ummmmm...... that last picture looks like he beat his car with a rock.  I see the weapon evidence in his hand

I am sure they are illustrating the large size of the hail for the photos, it isn't like they wanted photographic evidence of them beating on the car with rocks for a hail story.

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37 minutes ago, jsharrwick said:

No chance they tried to use the rocks to hold the tarp down during the storm.

As an insurance investigator.... I say no.

Claim denied.

 

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4 minutes ago, donkpow said:

I read a story about a guy who was swimming and got stuck in a hail storm. Baseball size hail. He made his way to a channel marker buoy and held on for life.

Yikes!  Big hail could knock you into amnesia, Jason Bourne-style!

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1 hour ago, Randomguy said:

Hail forms as droplets of water are carried upward into a thunderstorm. Updraughts carry them into parts of the atmosphere where the air is cold enough to freeze the droplets. Moisture from the air accumulates on the outside of the drops of ice as it moves through the air, causing the hailstone to grow in onion-like layers.

How fast a hailstone grows depends on the amount of moisture in the air. It will continue to grow until the updraught is no longer strong enough to keep it aloft. A 103km/h (64mph) updraft supports hail the size of a golf ball, while one 27% faster can create hailstones the size of baseballs, according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  More humid air and more powerful updraughts will bring bigger hailstones. Often larger hailstones will fall closer to the updraught while smaller hailstones will fall further away, often blown there by cross winds.

dang, that's one hail-raisin' storm!

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