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College degrees with worst return on investment


Road Runner
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Saw this article and thought it might be of interest to some of you with children getting close to college age.

 

http://www.salary.com/8-college-degrees-with-the-worst-return-on-investment/

 

The site makes you click through each one, one at a time, so here is the list.

 

8.  Sociology

7.  Fine arts

6.  Education

5.  Theology

4.  Hospitality/Tourism

3.  Nutrition

2.  Psychology

1.  Communications

 

Guess which degree my son has?  At least he's No. 1 in something after five years and lots of money spent.   :)

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Saw this article and thought it might be of interest to some of you with children getting close to college age.

 

http://www.salary.com/8-college-degrees-with-the-worst-return-on-investment/

 

The site makes you click through each one, one at a time, so here is the list.

 

8.  Sociology

7.  Fine arts

6.  Education

5.  Theology

4.  Hospitality/Tourism

3.  Nutrition

2.  Psychology

1.  Communications

 

Guess which degree my son has?  At least he's No. 1 in something after five years and lots of money spent.   :)

 

My degree is in organizational communitions.  I wish I had a different degree, one that was acceptable.  At least I went to the best and most acclaimed university in the country, the Ohio State University.

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A lady I know was filled with pride as she told me that her daughter is going to school for interior design and art.  I didn't say anything negative, but you can imagine what I was thinking.  It's shame, but if you have to get loans for a degree, we should think hard about the degree of choice.  How feasible will career success be?

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A lady I know was filled with pride as she told me that her daughter is going to school for interior design and art.  I didn't say anything negative, but you can imagine what I was thinking.  It's shame, but if you have to get loans for a degree, we should think hard about the degree of choice.  How feasible will career success be?

I tried to influence my son to change majors, but he was afraid of anything with math involved and he had some crazy idea that he could get a job as a sports reporter.  He has been out of school for seven years and now has a blue collar job working in a shipyard.  The way things look now, his degree and the time and money invested was totally wasted, at least from a monetary/career viewpoint.   :(

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I tried to influence my son to change majors, but he was afraid of anything with math involved and he had some crazy idea that he could get a job as a sports reporter.  He has been out of school for seven years and now has a blue collar job working in a shipyard.  The way things look now, his degree and the time and money invested was totally wasted, at least from a monetary/career viewpoint.   :(

 

From an experiential perspective, that time was invaluable.  Completing a degree program says something, too.  Good to have completed it, but it wouldn't have been the end of the world without it, too.

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A lady I know was filled with pride as she told me that her daughter is going to school for interior design and art.  I didn't say anything negative, but you can imagine what I was thinking.  It's shame, but if you have to get loans for a degree, we should think hard about the degree of choice.  How feasible will career success be?

 

Lots of sillyness there, but the young have no frame of reference from which to make a good decision about something important and costly that has lasting consequences.  Lots of interior design folks that become this because they can't think of anything else they would like to do.  Low barriers to entry, and lots of unemployed folks call themselves interior designers, idle rich hobbyists, too.  Probable waste of money.

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I tried to influence my son to change majors, but he was afraid of anything with math involved and he had some crazy idea that he could get a job as a sports reporter.  He has been out of school for seven years and now has a blue collar job working in a shipyard.  The way things look now, his degree and the time and money invested was totally wasted, at least from a monetary/career viewpoint.   :(

Way back when (1971), I was going to college and working full time in a shipyard in the warehouse.  One of the pipefitters came in for parts and saw me studying (night shift so we weren't too busy).  He said he had an Accounting degree from the same college and he could not find a job with his degree that paid enough, so he was working there strictly for the money.  Me being impressionable, and tired, thought about it and quit school.  Not the worst mistake in my life, but a bad one.

 

I look at it like this; get an education in what you like to do.  You may not get paid a lot, now or in the future, but you will at least like what you do.  It's analogous to college athletes; there are so many of them and many of them want to pursue professional careers in their sport, but few, very few, have the talent or desire to do so.  So it is in the academic world; so many graduates, so few positions to fill.  Very few can score the plum jobs right out of school.     

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