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So, how did you successfully repair the chips in your auto paint?


MoseySusan
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I've found the easiest way to repair chips in auto paint is to not worry about them.

 

 

But then again....look at what you called my "Armageddon Bike" and you probably wouldn't be surprised that I wouldn't worry about paint chips in my car. :D

 

I still use that term for my dear Trek 520, BTW. :D

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Depends on the scratch.  Deep scratches may need primer.  Light scratches may be better covered by brush or pen, depending on the type of scratch (wide, narrow, etc).  Be sure to clean the area first to remove all wax and foreign matter.  I like to use some rubbing alcohol (lightly) to make sure the surface is clean.  Don't expect miracles.  Cover the scratch so it isn't obvious or too noticeable and be happy.  You can do multiple coats and use rubbing compound to try to get it perfect, but in my opinion, you will only do more damage to the existing good paint.  Use the least amount of paint that is necessary to cover the scratch so that it doesn't stand up above the original.  With really thin scratches, I have even used my finger to wipe away the excess paint.

 

My suggestion would be for Mr to get a piece of painted scrap metal of some type, make a scratch similar to the one he will be covering, and then practice on it until he is confident that he can do it right the first time.   :)

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Depends on the scratch.  Deep scratches may need primer.  Light scratches may be better covered by brush or pen, depending on the type of scratch (wide, narrow, etc).  Be sure to clean the area first to remove all wax and foreign matter.  I like to use some rubbing alcohol (lightly) to make sure the surface is clean.  Don't expect miracles.  Cover the scratch so it isn't obvious or too noticeable and be happy.  You can do multiple coats and use rubbing compound to try to get it perfect, but in my opinion, you will only do more damage to the existing good paint.  Use the least amount of paint that is necessary to cover the scratch so that it doesn't stand up above the original.  With really thin scratches, I have even used my finger to wipe away the excess paint.

 

My suggestion would be for Mr to get a piece of painted scrap metal of some type, make a scratch similar to the one he will be covering, and then practice on it until he is confident that he can do it right the first time.   :)

Thanks for the information and suggestions.  He just came back from Auto Zone unhappy with what he saw on the shelves there.

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My suggestion would be for Mr wait for the neighbors to leave, make a scratch similar to the one he will be covering on their car, and then practice on it until he is confident that he can do it right the first time.   :)

 

^That is a GREAT idea!

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Thanks for the information and suggestions.  He just came back from Auto Zone unhappy with what he saw on the shelves there.

 

It's more expensive, but I prefer to use the touch-up paints sold by the original manufacturer dealers.  The paint match will be correct and you should only need the small pen/brush bottle which should last you for years, unless you have a crapload of scratches.

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It's more expensive, but I prefer to use the touch-up paints sold by the original manufacturer dealers.  The paint match will be correct and you should only need the small pen/brush bottle which should last you for years, unless you have a crapload of scratches.

He ordered the exact paint from the dealership.  We're good there.  The question is technique.

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He ordered the exact paint from the dealership.  We're good there.  The question is technique.

I have had a bigass chip right by the driver's door handle for months now, and I am afeared of screwing up.  Got the paint from the dealer a few months ago.  Watched some videos on VERY involved repair methods, and decided that was not my style, and I will glop some on there as best I can.  BTW, even if you are not a person who details your cars and doesn't really give a rat's ass how it looks, fixing chips is a must to prevent rust.

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If you're hoping for a factory finish with a touch up pen, its just not going to happen. But I do recemmend buying the paint though the dealer and shaking it very well before you apply it. I've had mixed results touching up chips. Even with the factory matched paint.

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a car finish isn't just paint, its a process

 

best thing to do it get some cans of spray paint and tag it gangsta style like a big burner over the whole car so its clear to anyone looking at it that you had no intentions of making it look right

 

If you aren't creative enough, or if you haven't got the can control necessary to do a good burner, then the next best thing is to just hit something else and see if you can't get some of their paint on your car. If you have different color paint on all four corners of your car, people will give you more room when you are merging

 

But if you never painted a car, you are probably better off just getting a 12 pack and saying fuck it

 

...or buy another car

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mr. found this checklist and a few videos by the guy.  

 

http://www.ammonyc.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/DC_207_PaintRepair_StepByStep_R1B.pdf

 

He's got more technology than we do, but the checklist is very helpful.  mr.'s going to start with an inconspicuous chip near the wheel well before touching up the ones on the front.  There's already rust on some of them.  He's not going for showroom perfect or restoration, but a decent job isn't out of the question either.

 

You have to see this guy...

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you know the best thing to do for a paint scratch on your hood?

 

ram a dumpster at 30 mph. That will fuck up your hood real good so that scratch won't hardly be noticeable at all ;)

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